Why Is My Period Blood Brown? - [] 2024: CLT Livre

Why Is My Period Blood Brown?

Should I be worried if my period blood is brown?

Dark red or brown period blood – Good news: Dark red or brown period blood is typically nothing to be concerned about. “The primary reason that period blood could be brown is because it’s old blood,” said Dr. Cummings. It usually happens at the beginning or the end of your period, when your flow is lighter.

  1. Because the longer blood takes to leave the body, the longer it has to oxidize (read: get exposed to oxygen), which makes it dark.
  2. It’s not necessarily a bad thing at all,” said Dr. Cummings.
  3. It often just means that it’s a lighter bleeding and so it’s just coming out slower.” Another reason for dark red or brown period blood: Birth control,

It can reduce how much you bleed overall, said Dr. Cummings, and when there’s not very much blood, it can take longer to come out. And something that might lead to brown blood in your underwear, but actually isn’t your period: implantation bleeding. Aka, the normal spotting that happens about two weeks into pregnancy.

What causes brown period blood?

Brown period blood tends to appear at the end of the menstrual cycle or during ovulation. But if you have other symptoms, it can sometimes indicate another health condition. You probably know what to expect during your period: how long it will last, when it’ll be the heaviest, and which days you’ll feel the worst.

  • So when you spot something abnormal, such as brown discharge or dark brown blood, you may be concerned.
  • Every woman experiences menstruation differently.
  • Your cycle might run like clockwork, with few cramps and short periods.
  • Other women may not be able to get out of bed for the first few days of their period, bleed very heavily, and never know how long it will last once it arrives.

Even if you have a regular, predictable period, you may notice variation from month to month. In most cases, brown blood during your period is normal. The color and consistency of blood can change throughout your menstrual cycle. It may be thin and watery one day, and thick and clumpy the next.

It may be bright red or brown, heavy or light, It’s normal for your periods to vary in length, heaviness, and level of discomfort. Brown blood is usually present toward the end of your cycle. As your body sheds the uterine lining in the first few days of your cycle, the blood is normally red. However, near the end of your cycle, the discharged blood is older and can be discolored.

Sometimes, spotting or brown discharge occurs in the middle of your cycle, during ovulation. This is more common in younger girls who are just starting to have their periods, women starting birth control, or women nearing menopause, When you experience bleeding between periods, you should see a doctor or nurse practitioner to make sure it’s not a symptom of a problem.

Certain types of birth control can cause brown discharge during your period, or even between periods. These include birth control implants such as Nexplanon, known as “the bar.” Birth control affects your hormone levels, so in many cases brown discharge is normal, even at the beginning of your period.

Occasionally, brown, bloody discharge accompanied by other symptoms can indicate a problem, Tell your doctor right away if you’re pregnant and experiencing brown-colored bleeding. This can mean that something is wrong with your pregnancy. You may need immediate medical care.

periods that last longer than 7 daysless than 21 days between periods or more than 35 days between periodsnot having a period for more than three to six monthsbleeding between periods bleeding after sex bleeding after menopause spotting (any color) any time during the monthpain in your vagina or lower abdomen fever that could indicate an infection fatigue heavy bleeding beyond your normal period flowbrown discharge after the insertion of an intrauterine device (IUD) seeing brown discharge when you’re taking tamoxifen, a breast cancer treatment

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can also cause brown discharge during your period. Other symptoms of PCOS include:

irregular cycles abnormal hair growth obesity acne breakouts infertility patches of thickened, velvety dark skin multiple cysts on the ovaries

The cause of PCOS isn’t known. It can be passed on genetically. If your brown discharge happens along with these other symptoms, ask your doctor to test you for it. Untreated PCOS can make you more susceptible to conditions such as type 2 diabetes, infertility, and cardiovascular disease,

  1. Getting tested and treated early on can help prevent these issues from developing.
  2. Some causes of brown discharge, including menopause, aren’t a problem.
  3. However, discharge can be a symptom of a yeast infection or a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as gonorrhea or chlamydia, that requires treatment.

Brown discharge can also be a sign of inflammatory conditions such as cervicitis or vaginitis, In rare cases, brown discharge can indicate cervical cancer, Talk to your doctor if you think you might have any of these issues. If you haven’t already done so, you may consider getting routine cervical cancer screenings or the human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccine,

Some light bleeding or brown discharge is normal during early pregnancy, but any time you have bleeding during pregnancy, you should call your doctor or midwife. Brown discharge during pregnancy can be a sign of early miscarriage, If you see brown discharge, note whether you have other abnormal symptoms, such as tissue or heavy pink fluid coming out of your vagina.

Other warning signs related to early pregnancy include:

abdominal pain or cramps shoulder painfeeling dizzy, weak, faint, or lightheadednot experiencing nausea or your normal pregnancy symptoms

If you feel any combination of these symptoms, see your doctor right away to make sure they aren’t signs of a miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy, Some substances, including cigarettes, alcohol, and illicit drugs like marijuana or cocaine, can cause miscarriages.

  1. It’s recommended that you avoid all of these substances completely while pregnant.
  2. A similar discharge that varies in color, called lochia, can appear after you have a baby.
  3. Follow your doctor or midwife’s directions about when to follow up.
  4. Brown discharge can also often happen after an abortion,
  5. If you have recently had an abortion, follow the directions you were given about who and when to call with symptoms.

As you age, your periods may change. The stage before menopause is called perimenopause. Brown discharge is normal during this stage as long as you don’t experience other abnormal symptoms. Menopause officially begins once 12 months have passed since your last period.

  • During the postmenopausal stage, after you’ve gone 12 months without having a period, you shouldn’t have any bleeding or brown discharge.
  • Most of the time, bleeding or discharge during menopause isn’t a serious problem.
  • However, blood and discharge can be related to inflammation of your vaginal lining ( atrophic vaginitis ), noncancerous polyps in your cervix, or other issues in your uterus or cervix including cancer.

If it’s been over a year since you’ve had your last period, see your doctor to identify any issues that may be causing bleeding or discharge. Many conditions that cause postmenopausal bleeding can easily be treated, especially if they’re caught early.

How long does brown period blood last?

Dry period blood – Blood that takes longer to exit your body becomes darker, often brown. It may also appear thicker, drier, and clumpier than regular blood. The brown color is the result of oxidation, which is a normal process. It happens when your blood comes into contact with air.

You may notice your period blood becomes darker or brown near the end of your period. Some women experience brown discharge for a day or two after their period ends. Others have brown discharge that comes and goes for a week or two. It really just depends on how well your uterus sheds its lining and the speed at which it exits your body.

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Everyone is different.

Do you count brown blood as first day of period?

Menstruation: Days 1 – 5 – Day 1 of your cycle is the first day of your period, meaning the first day of full flow (spotting doesn’t count). During this time, the uterus sheds its lining from the previous cycle. Between days 1 – 5 of your cycle, new follicles (sacs of fluid containing eggs) begin to develop within your ovaries.

Is brown period harmful?

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Brown period blood is normal when it’s at the beginning or end of your period. But you should see a doctor if you also experience unusual pain, a foul smell, or blood clots. If you have brown blood between your periods, then this could be a sign of PCOS.

Period blood isn’t always red – it can range from light pink to dark blackish-brown. Brown period blood usually isn’t a cause for concern, but if it shows up in between your periods or with other symptoms like a foul smell, this may be a sign of a medical issue. Here’s what you need to know about why your period blood is brown and when you need to see a doctor.

Does brown period mean infection?

If a person’s vaginal discharge is pinkish-brown, this usually means it contains blood. However, this does not always mean there is a serious problem. Reasons can range from light menstruation to an infection or an ectopic pregnancy.

Is brown period pregnant?

During pregnancy – Pink or brown discharge or spotting before a period may be an early sign of pregnancy. Not every pregnant person will experience this symptom, but some do. This discharge is caused by implantation bleeding that can happen when the fertilized egg burrows into the uterus lining.

  1. Implantation bleeding can occur 1 to 2 weeks after the egg has been fertilized.
  2. Anyone who experiences implantation bleeding following sex should take a pregnancy test.
  3. Anyone who is pregnant and experiences dark brown discharge should speak with a doctor.
  4. However, brown discharge during pregnancy is not usually a cause for concern.

In rare cases, it may indicate an ectopic pregnancy or miscarriage.

How do you get rid of brown periods?

Treatment and Prevention – Your treatment will vary depending on what’s causing the brown discharge. If you’re suffering from a vaginal infection, for example, your doctor will prescribe you antifungals or antibiotics, depending on the kind of infection you have.

Don’t douche. The vagina is designed to clean itself, and discharge is its natural way to help irritants flow out of your body. It’s okay to wash with water, but soap inside your vagina can upset the delicate balance of your vaginal flora and result in bacterial vaginosis (BV). BV is not an STI, but it can be extremely itchy and requires antibiotic treatment. Avoid using perfumed soaps, sprays, and wipes. These can affect your vagina’s pH level and lead to irritation, yeast infections, or BV. Urinate after sex and clean your sex toys after each use. Wear breathable cotton underwear and change it daily. Change out of wet or sweaty clothes as soon as possible. Moist environments are prime targets for bad bacteria.

If you are constantly having brown discharge or spotting and it’s bothering you, ask your OB/GYN. They may consider prescribing a new birth control method with higher estrogen that can help stop the spotting. Hormonal contraception can also help manage chronic menstrual pain from conditions like PCOS or endometriosis.

Why do I have brown discharge but no period and negative pregnancy test?

In all likelihood, you’ve got your menstrual cycle down to a science. So when you miss your period, it can immediately trigger the pressing question “Am I pregnant?” Maybe you’re trying to conceive, so you start to get your hopes up. Or maybe parenthood part of your plans, and you’re struck with feelings of impending doom.

Whatever the case, you grab a pregnancy test at the drugstore, take it, and wait nervously for those two blue lines to show up. But the test comes out negative and you still haven’t gotten your period. What the heck is going on? Is everything OK? Depending on when you took the test, you could get a false negative result.

Home pregnancy tests aren’t always perfectly accurate — especially if you take them too soon after your missed period. Different brands of tests have different guidelines about timing. Even if the test you bought claims to be accurate on the first day of a missed period, you’re better off waiting at least one more day.

Your body needs to have a high enough level of the hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) for the test to detect. Early in pregnancy, HCG levels double every few days. Since your ovulation date could be slightly different each month, it may take a week or two after conception to get a reliable pregnancy test result.

Wait several days, and if you still don’t get your period, take the test again. It’s best to take a pregnancy test first thing in the morning, before your urine has been diluted with fluids from food and water. If the second or third test is negative, it’s time to look at other potential causes of your missed period.

  1. Amenorrhea (the scientific term for lack of menstruation) can happen for many reasons, and you may need to see a healthcare provider to get things back on track.
  2. Here are eight possible reasons for a missed period and a negative pregnancy test.
  3. If you gain or lose a significant amount of weight in a short time, it can mess with your hormones — and therefore your menstrual cycle.

Your periods might become irregular or stop altogether. People with eating disorders like anorexia or bulimia sometimes lose their periods as a result of these conditions. If you think you or someone you know may have an eating disorder, contact the NEDA Helpline at 1(800) 931-2237, or instant message a representative through NEDA’s helpline chat.

High stress levels can also wreak havoc on your hormones. Try to get some rest, eat well, and remove as many anxiety triggers as you can. You might also consider talking to a mental health professional to learn how to manage your stress in a productive way. Have you been super sick recently with the flu, mono, or another condition that put you in bed watching movies for several days straight? It could potentially affect your menstrual cycle.

As long as you get back to your normal routine, your regular period should return within a month or so. Your daily workout routine might help you with those #BootyGains, but be careful not to overdo it. Excessive exercise can cause your metabolism to slow down as your body tries to conserve energy, and in some cases, your period may become irregular or stop altogether.

This could also happen if you’re not eating enough to balance the daily calorie burn. Some medications, like birth control, can cause changes in your cycle and cause your periods to lighten or stop over the course of several months. If you recently started a new antidepressant, contraceptive, or any type of hormone replacement, talk with your doctor about why your period is MIA and whether it’s something to worry about.

Prolactin, the primary hormone that supports breast milk production, also stops menstruation. New moms who are breastfeeding a child may have light periods or no periods at all. (Kind of a win, right?) Some health conditions can mess with your menstrual cycle by changing the levels of common fertility hormones in your body.

If you think you might have polycystic ovary syndrome or another pelvic condition, talk to your doctor for further insight on diagnosis and treatment. In rare cases, a fertilized egg can implant itself outside the uterus, causing something called an ectopic pregnancy that can’t be detected by a normal pregnancy test.

This requires medical attention ASAP, so look out for other symptoms such as:

sudden, sharp abdominal painabnormal bleedingcramping in your lower back and pelvic area

If you notice these symptoms, call your doctor right away. No period but still experiencing brownish discharge or light bleeding during odd times in your cycle? Several of the same issues we just covered could be causing this — birth control, pelvic conditions, weight changes, or stress.

Spotting can also happen due to ovulation, sexually transmitted infections, or (in rare cases) benign or malignant tissue growths. If the spotting is accompanied by fever, yellow or foul-smelling discharge, or acute pain, see your doctor. Spotting could also mean you’re entering perimenopause, the stage when your body begins the transition to menopause.

For most women, this happens between the mid-30s and 40s. If you’ve already gone through menopause and are experiencing spotting, you should talk to your doctor about it. When your hormones get out of balance, your cycle can change, and it may not get back to normal until you sort out the cause.

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If you’re dealing with a temporary issue like stress or illness, or something prescribed by a doctor, like medication or birth control, there’s no need to be concerned. But if you haven’t had a period in 3 months or more, or if your period happens less often than every 35 days, you should consult your healthcare provider.

It’s also a good idea to call your doctor if your period changes significantly — say, your bleeding gets a lot heavier or your cramps get way worse. In most cases, lifestyle changes or medication adjustments can help get your cycle back on track. You are the expert on your own body, so it’s important to pay attention to your periods and bleeding patterns.

Can stress cause brown discharge?

Stress can cause your cortisol levels to spike, disrupting your body’s production of sex hormones. This can result in spotting and other menstrual changes. Spotting generally takes the form of small droplets of blood in your underwear or a pink, red, or brown tinge to your discharge.

  1. The color of your spotting is determined by the amount of time that’s passed since the blood was released from the lining of the uterus,” says Jane van Dis, MD, OB-GYN, a medical advisor with menstrual company FLEX,
  2. It typically occurs on either side of your menstrual period — before your period starts in earnest or after you think your period has ended — but can happen at any point in your monthly cycle,

High levels of stress can prompt your endocrine system to release more cortisol, Cortisol is a steroid hormone produced by your adrenal glands. The entire endocrine system is connected, and increased cortisol can have a ripple effect. Both estrogen and testosterone, for example, can decrease when cortisol levels rise.

An unexpected change in your estrogen levels can disrupt your menstrual cycle, resulting in spotting, missed menstruation, or other irregularities. “Anything that impacts you as a person has the potential to impact the menstrual cycle and therefore cause spotting,” explains reproductive health specialist Felice Gersh, MD, author of ” PCOS SOS: A Gynecologist’s Lifeline To Naturally Restore Your Rhythms, Hormones, and Happiness,” “It’s reasonable, for instance, to assume that stress is the cause of spotting if you were recently laid off, dumped, or moved,” she says.

Stress-induced spotting is usually accompanied by other symptoms of stress, including:

difficulty sleeping difficulty concentrating changes in appetite generalized fatigue muscle aches digestive upset sexual dysfunction

“Spotting, by its name, implies that an individual is releasing a smaller amount of blood than they would during their period,” says van Dis. As such, you shouldn’t need a sanitary pad or tampon to catch the blood. (If you do, you aren’t spotting — you have another form of vaginal bleeding ).

  1. A simple panty liner should do the trick.
  2. Though, if you already own period underwear, donning those would be a more environmentally-friendly option.
  3. If you choose to free-bleed and end up staining your underwear, these blood-removal hacks should do the trick.
  4. It may be easier said than done, but to manage stress-related spotting you need to manage your overall stress levels,

“You could incorporate meditation, journaling, grounding, or nature walking into your routine,” says Gersh. Going to a physical therapist, massage therapist, or licensed acupuncturist for myofascial release therapy, deep tissue massage, or another form of bodywork could also prove useful, she says.

drinking enough water eating nutrient-dense meals monitoring caffeine intake maintaining a regular movement practice limiting alcohol, nicotine, and other substance use

If you continue to feel stressed — or otherwise feel grumpier, less focused, or more irritable than normal — it may be time to talk with a mental health professional, The right therapist can help you deduce the root of your stress, as well as give you tools to manage it.

“If you have a regular period and this is your first time spotting, you’d be wise to rule out pregnancy as the underlying cause if there’s a chance that you could be pregnant,” says Gersh. You can find out if you’re pregnant by taking an at-home urine test 10 or more days after you last had vaginal intercourse with a person who produces sperm.

You can also ask a healthcare professional to order a blood test, which can usually detect pregnancy a few days earlier. If this is the first time you’ve ever spotted and there’s no chance you’re pregnant, Gersh says it’s probably OK to assume that stress — or some other lifestyle change — is the cause.

  • But if you’re experiencing other unusual symptoms or bodily changes, she recommends consulting with a healthcare professional.
  • Although stress commonly causes spotting, it isn’t the only cause.
  • Do what you can to rule out pregnancy and take note of any other symptoms you may be experiencing.
  • If you use hormonal birth control, your spotting could be breakthrough bleeding,

In some cases, spotting may be a sign of an underlying infection or other condition. When in doubt, consult with a healthcare professional. Gabrielle Kassel (she/her) is a queer sex educator and wellness journalist who is committed to helping people feel the best they can in their bodies.

In addition to Healthline, her work has appeared in publications such as Shape, Cosmopolitan, Well+Good, Health, Self, Women’s Health, Greatist, and more! In her free time, Gabrielle can be found coaching CrossFit, reviewing pleasure products, hiking with her border collie, or recording episodes of the podcast she co-hosts called Bad In Bed,

Follow her on Instagram @ Gabriellekassel,

Why do I have brown discharge instead of my period?

What Does It Mean When Your Period Is Brown? – There are many times throughout your cycle that vaginal discharge could be brown.

Brown discharge before your period: sometimes, the very light flow at the beginning of your period looks brown. You might even have brown spotting, or brown blood at the beginning of your period, instead of your period. Totally normal, and no reason to worry. Brown discharge during your period: again, this is usually very normal. Sometimes your uterus has more tissue to clear out than other months, and it can often look brown instead of red. Other times, you might just have a bit of dark brown discharge instead of a period. It all depends on your cycle and what is normal for your body. Brown discharge after your period: old blood often looks brown. So, if this is old blood from your uterus a few days after your period, or the last couple of days, the blood is brown simply because it’s old. This brown discharge after your period is normal. Brown discharge when you’re pregnant: some women will have pink or brown spotting as an early sign of pregnancy. When a fertilized egg burrows into the uterus wall, it sometimes causes a bit of bleeding. This is called “implantation bleeding” and usually happens one to two weeks after conception. After you’ve taken a pregnancy test or you already know you’re pregnant, brown discharge could be a cause for concern. In very rare cases, it could be an ectopic pregnancy or be a sign of miscarriage. Talk to you OBGYN as soon as you can, and she can help you figure out what’s going on. Also—after you have given birth, you’ll experience lochia. Lochia is a four to six week period after giving birth that your body will bleed, usually a heavy red flow at first that turns yellow or brown after the first week or so. Brown discharge between periods or with no period: if you just had a Pap smear test or vaginal exam, you might experience some spotting. It could be bright red, pink, or brown. If it continues after a couple of days, talk to your physician, just in case. Another time you might have brown spotting when you’re not on your period is after sex. Again, watch it and make sure it isn’t super heavy and doesn’t continue for several days. Women and girls, from their first period through menopause, often have brown spotting when they are ovulating.

Why is my period blood brown and stringy?

Clumpy period blood – As your period continues, you may notice blood that’s jelly-like or broken up into thick clumps. This is typically caused by blood clots that are passing through your body. This is normal during any part of your period. However, you may be more likely to see this on later days of your period as your flow begins to slow down. These clots may be bright red, dark red, or brown,

Why was my period only 2 days?

Other conditions – Less common conditions that may cause irregular or shorter periods include:

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cervical stenosis, a narrowing of the passageway through the cervix premature ovarian failure (POF), also known as premature menopause Asherman syndrome, caused by scar tissue or adhesions inside the uterus or cervix anemia pituitary disorders uterine or cervical cancer

Young women going through puberty may have irregular periods for the first few years after they start menstruating. Another time when periods may become irregular is during perimenopause, This occurs quite a few years before menopause. According to the Cleveland Clinic, women can enter perimenopause 8 to 10 years ahead of menopause, meaning it could happen in your 30s or 40s.

Does black period blood mean pregnant?

What does black discharge indicate? – In most cases, black discharge is a normal part of the menstrual cycle. However, black discharge can also be a sign of certain medical complications such as hormone imbalance, STIs, and (in rare cases) cervical cancer.

How do you get rid of brown periods?

Treatment and Prevention – Your treatment will vary depending on what’s causing the brown discharge. If you’re suffering from a vaginal infection, for example, your doctor will prescribe you antifungals or antibiotics, depending on the kind of infection you have.

Don’t douche. The vagina is designed to clean itself, and discharge is its natural way to help irritants flow out of your body. It’s okay to wash with water, but soap inside your vagina can upset the delicate balance of your vaginal flora and result in bacterial vaginosis (BV). BV is not an STI, but it can be extremely itchy and requires antibiotic treatment. Avoid using perfumed soaps, sprays, and wipes. These can affect your vagina’s pH level and lead to irritation, yeast infections, or BV. Urinate after sex and clean your sex toys after each use. Wear breathable cotton underwear and change it daily. Change out of wet or sweaty clothes as soon as possible. Moist environments are prime targets for bad bacteria.

If you are constantly having brown discharge or spotting and it’s bothering you, ask your OB/GYN. They may consider prescribing a new birth control method with higher estrogen that can help stop the spotting. Hormonal contraception can also help manage chronic menstrual pain from conditions like PCOS or endometriosis.

Why do I have brown discharge but no period and negative pregnancy test?

In all likelihood, you’ve got your menstrual cycle down to a science. So when you miss your period, it can immediately trigger the pressing question “Am I pregnant?” Maybe you’re trying to conceive, so you start to get your hopes up. Or maybe parenthood part of your plans, and you’re struck with feelings of impending doom.

Whatever the case, you grab a pregnancy test at the drugstore, take it, and wait nervously for those two blue lines to show up. But the test comes out negative and you still haven’t gotten your period. What the heck is going on? Is everything OK? Depending on when you took the test, you could get a false negative result.

Home pregnancy tests aren’t always perfectly accurate — especially if you take them too soon after your missed period. Different brands of tests have different guidelines about timing. Even if the test you bought claims to be accurate on the first day of a missed period, you’re better off waiting at least one more day.

  • Your body needs to have a high enough level of the hormone human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) for the test to detect.
  • Early in pregnancy, HCG levels double every few days.
  • Since your ovulation date could be slightly different each month, it may take a week or two after conception to get a reliable pregnancy test result.

Wait several days, and if you still don’t get your period, take the test again. It’s best to take a pregnancy test first thing in the morning, before your urine has been diluted with fluids from food and water. If the second or third test is negative, it’s time to look at other potential causes of your missed period.

  • Amenorrhea (the scientific term for lack of menstruation) can happen for many reasons, and you may need to see a healthcare provider to get things back on track.
  • Here are eight possible reasons for a missed period and a negative pregnancy test.
  • If you gain or lose a significant amount of weight in a short time, it can mess with your hormones — and therefore your menstrual cycle.

Your periods might become irregular or stop altogether. People with eating disorders like anorexia or bulimia sometimes lose their periods as a result of these conditions. If you think you or someone you know may have an eating disorder, contact the NEDA Helpline at 1(800) 931-2237, or instant message a representative through NEDA’s helpline chat.

High stress levels can also wreak havoc on your hormones. Try to get some rest, eat well, and remove as many anxiety triggers as you can. You might also consider talking to a mental health professional to learn how to manage your stress in a productive way. Have you been super sick recently with the flu, mono, or another condition that put you in bed watching movies for several days straight? It could potentially affect your menstrual cycle.

As long as you get back to your normal routine, your regular period should return within a month or so. Your daily workout routine might help you with those #BootyGains, but be careful not to overdo it. Excessive exercise can cause your metabolism to slow down as your body tries to conserve energy, and in some cases, your period may become irregular or stop altogether.

This could also happen if you’re not eating enough to balance the daily calorie burn. Some medications, like birth control, can cause changes in your cycle and cause your periods to lighten or stop over the course of several months. If you recently started a new antidepressant, contraceptive, or any type of hormone replacement, talk with your doctor about why your period is MIA and whether it’s something to worry about.

Prolactin, the primary hormone that supports breast milk production, also stops menstruation. New moms who are breastfeeding a child may have light periods or no periods at all. (Kind of a win, right?) Some health conditions can mess with your menstrual cycle by changing the levels of common fertility hormones in your body.

If you think you might have polycystic ovary syndrome or another pelvic condition, talk to your doctor for further insight on diagnosis and treatment. In rare cases, a fertilized egg can implant itself outside the uterus, causing something called an ectopic pregnancy that can’t be detected by a normal pregnancy test.

This requires medical attention ASAP, so look out for other symptoms such as:

sudden, sharp abdominal painabnormal bleedingcramping in your lower back and pelvic area

If you notice these symptoms, call your doctor right away. No period but still experiencing brownish discharge or light bleeding during odd times in your cycle? Several of the same issues we just covered could be causing this — birth control, pelvic conditions, weight changes, or stress.

Spotting can also happen due to ovulation, sexually transmitted infections, or (in rare cases) benign or malignant tissue growths. If the spotting is accompanied by fever, yellow or foul-smelling discharge, or acute pain, see your doctor. Spotting could also mean you’re entering perimenopause, the stage when your body begins the transition to menopause.

For most women, this happens between the mid-30s and 40s. If you’ve already gone through menopause and are experiencing spotting, you should talk to your doctor about it. When your hormones get out of balance, your cycle can change, and it may not get back to normal until you sort out the cause.

If you’re dealing with a temporary issue like stress or illness, or something prescribed by a doctor, like medication or birth control, there’s no need to be concerned. But if you haven’t had a period in 3 months or more, or if your period happens less often than every 35 days, you should consult your healthcare provider.

It’s also a good idea to call your doctor if your period changes significantly — say, your bleeding gets a lot heavier or your cramps get way worse. In most cases, lifestyle changes or medication adjustments can help get your cycle back on track. You are the expert on your own body, so it’s important to pay attention to your periods and bleeding patterns.

Does black period blood mean pregnant?

What does black discharge indicate? – In most cases, black discharge is a normal part of the menstrual cycle. However, black discharge can also be a sign of certain medical complications such as hormone imbalance, STIs, and (in rare cases) cervical cancer.