Who Is The Oldest Person Alive? - []

Who Is The Oldest Person Alive?

Who is the oldest person on earth ever?

Jeanne Louise Calment – Oldest person ever – 120-year-old Jeanne Louise Calment sitting in armchair at home © Ian Cook/Getty Images Jeanne Louise Calment is the oldest verified person to have ever lived. The Frenchwoman lived to the ripe old age of 122 years and 164 days old. She was born on 21 February 1875 and passed away aged 122 on 4 August 1997.

Who is the oldest person alive right now 2023?

US-born Spaniard Maria Branyas is 116-years-old and took the title of oldest person in the world earlier in 2023 after the death of Sister Andre at 118. In 2020, Ms Branyas became the oldest person to be diagnosed with and then recover from the Covid-19 virus.

Who lived to be 300 years old?

Greece – A book Macrobii (“Long-Livers”) is a work devoted to longevity. It was attributed to the ancient Greek author Lucian, although it is now accepted that he could not have written it. Most examples given in it are lifespans of 80 to 100 years, but some are much longer:

  • Tiresias, the blind seer of Thebes, over 600 years.
  • Nestor, over 300 years.
  • Members of the “Seres” (a Chinese people), over 300 years.

According to one tradition, Epimenides of Crete (7th, 6th centuries BC) lived nearly 300 years.

Has anyone lived past 120 years?

Age 100 and Counting (April 2003) Reaching age 100 has long fascinated society. The century mark holds an almost mystical importance as a seal of hardiness and good health — the sign of a life well-lived. People who reach 100 are regularly feted in newspaper stories, television broadcasts, and family parties.

  • Some get birthday greetings from the White House.
  • As life expectancy increases, an increasing number of Americans are attaining this milestone.
  • Centenarians have a unique perspective on our recent history.
  • Americans who reached age 100 in 2000 were born at the dawn of the 20th century.
  • They were too young to participate in World War I and reached adulthood as the world was gripped by the 1918 influenza epidemic.

This group was forming its families as the Great Depression started and had some of the highest rates of childlessness recorded in the United States. The advent of World War II found many of them too old to be called into service, but they were a vital force in stateside war efforts.

  1. Today’s centenarians reached retirement age as the United States entered the Vietnam War and social turmoil of the 1960s and 1970s.
  2. They witnessed remarkable and unprecedented technological and medical advances in their lifetimes.
  3. Centenarians may hold the key to the limits of life and are a new and fascinating focus for medical and social research.

Researchers are examining their physical and mental health, their genes, their families, and their lifestyles, trying to unlock the secrets of long life. The growth in the number of centenarians in the world is remarkable. Accurate records are difficult to come by before the 20th century, although there have been claims of super longevity throughout history, such as the story of 969-year-old Methuselah in the Bible.

Other examples of supercentenarian status are found in age claims of 122 years for St. Patrick of Ireland, 152 years for Englishman Thomas Parr (1483-1635), and groups of individuals in Bulgaria, Kashmir, and the Andes. Rigorous investigation of these claims, however, finds no evidence to support them.

Some speculate that before 1900 the incidence of centenarians may have been as small as one per century. In small countries, like Denmark, researchers find little evidence of centenarians before the 19th century.1 Given the rarity of living to age 100, it is possible that few populations were large enough until recently to produce any centenarians.

Verification of age is very difficult, even today. Many centenarians do not have birth records or other documents to confirm their stated age. Verification of age entails collecting credible and corroborating evidence from a variety of sources, including interviews with the person when possible. Reported life events are checked for consistency with historical records and documents.

Verification becomes more difficult the older the individual and after his or her death. The oldest known age ever attained was by Jeanne Calment, a Frenchwoman who died in 1997 at the age of 122. Ms. Calment is also the only documented case of a person living past 120, which many scientists had pegged as the upper limit of the human lifespan.

Is there anyone still alive from the 1800s?

In 1899, when Emma Morano was born, Italy’s parliament (shown) and society were racked by debates over public safety, the right to strike and freedom of the press. DeAgostini/Getty Images Italian Emma Morano, born on November 29, 1899, is now the last living person officially recognised to have been born in the 1800s.

  • Currently aged 116 years and 166 days, Morano was born in Civiasco, Vercelli, Piedmont, Italy, during the reign of King Umberto I.
  • She’s now the oldest person in the world, following the death of American Susannah Mushatt Jones, who came to be known as “the very last American from the 1800s”, at her home in New York.

The longest-living human ever recorded was France’s Jeanne Calment, born in 1875, who had reached the age of 122 years and 164 days when she died in 1997. Speaking to The New York Times in 2015, Morano attributed her longevity to eating three eggs a day – two of them raw – as recommended by a doctor when she suffered anaemia in her teens, and to remaining single for most of her life.

  1. Life expectancy in general has increased massively over the past 200 years.
  2. The USA’s National Institute on Aging observes that “although most babies born in 1900 did not live past age 50, life expectancy at birth now exceeds 83 years in Japan – the current leader – and is at least 81 years in several other countries.” This can largely be attributed to the progress of medical science throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.

In the UK, life expectancy at birth is now on average 82.8 years for women and 79.1 years for men, according to the Office of National Statistics, while the most common age at death is 86 for men and 89 for women.

Who is the oldest person ever 157 years old?

Debate – There is a debate as to his actual age when he died. According to the death certificate provided by his Turkish doctor, Zaro Aga’s age was 157. He died in, although some confusion about the place of death exists, probably because the body was sent to the US right after his death.

How many people are 100 years old?

Demographics – According to data posted by the Population Division of the United Nations, in 2021 ( https://population.un.org/wpp/Download/Standard/Population/ ):

USA number of centenarians. Out of a US population of approximately 336,997,624, in 2021, there were 89,739 centenarians (age 100+) or a prevalence of 0.027%. The prevalence of centenarians has been increasing and in the past twenty years, the rate nearly doubled.

Perls T. US Centenarian Prevalence 1950-2020. Derived from United Nations, Dept Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2022). Number of Nonagenarian (90-99 years) and Centenarian (100+) Social Security Beneficiaries according to State or Territory in 2019.

Rank State or Territory Nonagenarians Centenarians Total Population Centenarian Prevalence Per 10,000 1 per X population
1 Hawaii 14,321 585 1,415,872 0.0413% 4.1 2420.3
2 Connecticut 34,374 1,262 3,565,287 0.0354% 3.5 2825.1
3 Puerto Rico 24,934 1,107 3,193,694 0.0347% 3.5 2885.0
4 Rhode Island 10,333 359 1,059,361 0.0339% 3.4 2950.9
5 South Dakota 7,565 298 884,659 0.0337% 3.4 2968.7
6 Iowa 28,342 977 3,155,070 0.0310% 3.1 3229.3
7 North Dakota 6,329 235 762,062 0.0308% 3.1 3242.8
8 New York 153,488 5,780 19,453,561 0.0297% 3.0 3365.7
9 Massachusetts 56,899 1,969 6,892,503 0.0286% 2.9 3500.5
10 Pennsylvania 118,782 3,546 12,801,989 0.0277% 2.8 3610.3
11 New Jersey 71,985 2,375 8,882,190 0.0267% 2.7 3739.9
12 Vermont 5,226 166 623,989 0.0266% 2.7 3759.0
13 District of Columbia 3,519 183 705,749 0.0259% 2.6 3856.6
14 Kansas 22,182 744 2,913,314 0.0255% 2.6 3915.7
15 Maine 11,427 336 1,344,212 0.0250% 2.5 4000.6
16 New Hampshire 10,606 337 1,359,711 0.0248% 2.5 4034.8
17 Wisconsin 47,615 1,434 5,822,434 0.0246% 2.5 4060.3
18 Minnesota 41,914 1,376 5,639,632 0.0244% 2.4 4098.6
19 Illinois 90,167 3,081 12,671,821 0.0243% 2.4 4112.9
20 Nebraska 14,789 464 1,934,408 0.0240% 2.4 4169.0
21 Florida 170,591 5,113 21,477,737 0.0238% 2.4 4200.6
22 Michigan 76,815 2,261 9,986,857 0.0226% 2.3 4417.0
23 Ohio 88,102 2,535 11,689,100 0.0217% 2.2 4611.1
24 Maryland 37,965 1,305 6,045,680 0.0216% 2.2 4632.7
25 Missouri 42,870 1,312 6,137,428 0.0214% 2.1 4677.9
26 Oregon 30,218 895 4,217,737 0.0212% 2.1 4712.6
27 California 232,707 8,012 39,512,223 0.0203% 2.0 4931.6
28 Indiana 45,812 1,365 6,732,219 0.0203% 2.0 4932.0
29 Montana 7,377 216 1,068,778 0.0202% 2.0 4948.0
30 Washington 46,266 1,528 7,614,893 0.0201% 2.0 4983.6
31 Virginia 50,799 1,572 8,535,519 0.0184% 1.8 5429.7
32 Arkansas 17,992 553 3,017,804 0.0183% 1.8 5457.2
33 Delaware 6,722 178 973,764 0.0183% 1.8 5470.6
34 South Carolina 29,509 940 5,148,714 0.0183% 1.8 5477.4
35 West Virginia 12,895 318 1,792,147 0.0177% 1.8 5635.7
36 Mississippi 16,780 520 2,976,149 0.0175% 1.7 5723.4
37 North Carolina 61,090 1,796 10,488,084 0.0171% 1.7 5839.7
38 New Mexico 12,381 349 2,096,829 0.0166% 1.7 6008.1
39 Alabama 28,122 793 4,903,185 0.0162% 1.6 6183.1
40 Idaho 10,198 286 1,787,065 0.0160% 1.6 6248.5
41 Louisiana 25,559 722 4,648,794 0.0155% 1.6 6438.8
42 Oklahoma 22,973 614 3,956,971 0.0155% 1.6 6444.6
43 Wyoming 3,429 89 578,759 0.0154% 1.5 6502.9
44 Arizona 41,987 1,110 7,278,717 0.0152% 1.5 6557.4
45 Tennessee 38,041 1,029 6,829,174 0.0151% 1.5 6636.7
46 Colorado 29,326 855 5,758,736 0.0148% 1.5 6735.4
47 Kentucky 25,346 632 4,467,673 0.0141% 1.4 7069.1
48 Georgia 46,111 1,415 10,617,423 0.0133% 1.3 7503.5
49 Texas 124,732 3,414 28,995,881 0.0118% 1.2 8493.2
50 Nevada 12,796 356 3,080,156 0.0116% 1.2 8652.1
51 Utah 12,258 271 3,205,958 0.0085% 0.8 11830.1
52 Alaska 2,029 52 731,545 0.0071% 0.7 14068.2
All 2,218,939 69,944 328,239,523 0.0213% 2.1 4692.9

Table created by Tom Perls MD (2023) from the following sources: Total Population (2019) from: 2019 National and State Population Estimates, NST-EST2019-01: Table 1. URL: https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-kits/2019/national-state-estimates.html Number of Nonagenarian and Centenarian SSA Beneficiaries from page 294 of: Annual Statistical Supplement to the Social Security Bulletin, 2020.

Who lived for 140 years?

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mbah Gotho
Born Saparman Sodimejo 31 December 1870 Central Java, Dutch East Indies
Died 30 April 2017 (aged 146) Central Java, Indonesia
Cause of death Heart failure
Nationality Indonesian
Known for Being possibly the oldest person in history
Height 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in)

Saparman Sodimejo, popularly known as Mbah Gotho, was an Indonesian man who gained attention for his claim of having lived over 140 years. Although there is no conclusive evidence to verify his exact age, the Indonesian Government reportedly recognized him as one of the oldest individuals based on an issued ID card.

Who lived up to 700 years?

In other religious texts – A depiction of Methuselah at the Church of San Juan Bautista in Carbonero el Mayor, Segovia Province, Spain The apocryphal Book of Enoch claims to be revelations of Enoch, transcribed by him and entrusted to be preserved for future generations by his son, Methuselah.

In this book, Enoch recounts two visions he has had to Methuselah. The first is about the Flood, and the second chronicles the history of the world from Adam to the Last Judgment, In the latter vision, men are represented as animals – the righteous are white cattle and sheep, the sinners and enemies of Israel are black cattle and wild animals.

Following his father’s death in the Book of Enoch, Methuselah is designated by God as a priest, while Methuselah’s grandson, Noah’s brother Nir, is designated by God as his successor. In Slavonic Enoch, Methuselah asks his father for a blessing, and is given instructions on how to live righteously.

After their father ascends into heaven, Methuselah and his brothers build an altar and make “a great festivity, praising God who had given such a sign by means of Enoch, who had found favor with Him.” The Book of Jubilees presents itself as “the history of the division of the days of the Law, of the events of the years, the year-weeks, and the jubilees of the world” and claims to be a revelation of God to Moses, given through the Angel of the Presence in addition to the written Law received by Moses on Mount Sinai ; and, while the written Law was to be imparted to all, this was to be a secret tradition entrusted only to the saints of each generation, to Enoch, Methuselah, Noah, and Shem, then to Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Levi, and finally to the priests and scribes of the latter times.

Rabbinic literature states that when Noah was 480 years old, all the righteous men were dead—except Methuselah and himself. At God’s command, they both announced that 120 years would be given to men for repentance; if in that time they had not mended their evil ways, the earth would be destroyed.

But their plea was in vain; even while Noah was engaged in building the ark, the wicked—who were of immense stature as they were descended from the sons of God —made sport of him and his work, saying: “If the Flood should come, it could not harm us. We are too tall; and, moreover, we could close up with our feet the springs from below.” They resorted to these tactics; but God heated the water, and their feet and the flesh of their bodies was scalded.

The 17th-century midrashic Sefer haYashar (” Book of Jasher “) describes Methuselah with his grandson Noah attempting to persuade the people of the earth to return to godliness. All other very long-lived people died, and Methuselah was the only one of this class left.

God planned to bring the flood after all the men who walked in the ways of the Lord had died (besides Noah and his family). Methuselah lived until the ark was built but died before the flood, since God had promised he would not be killed with the unrighteous. The Sefer haYashar gives Methuselah’s age at death as 960.

Methuselah ( Arabic : Matūshalaḥ ) is also mentioned in Islam in the various collections of stories of the pre-Islamic prophets, which also say he was an ancestor of Noah. Furthermore, early Islamic writers like Ibn Ishaq and Ibn Hisham always included his name in the genealogy of Muhammad,

Who lived 700 years?

Name with title: Śrī Śrī 1008 Brahmarṣi Yōgīrāja Dēvarahā Bābā – In Shrimad Valmiki Ramayana, we see Lord Ram personally went to see many Yogi-Bhaktas like Rishi Sharbhanga, Rishi Sutikshana, etc who were keeping their bodies and waiting for the arrival of Shri Ram in order to see Ram’s personal incarnation, otherwise they were already fit to go to the supreme abode, the abode of supreme Brahman.

  • Those great yogis had already won all the worlds from their great ascetism and penances, they were waiting so that they could see Bhagavan Shri Rama and cast off their material bodies in his presence so that they could achieve his personal abode Saket-Loka.
  • Through the grace of Bhagavan Shri Ram, they got eternally young bodies as like devas who bear young appearance of the twenty five year old person.

Thus, the tradition of Yogi-Bhaktas in Vaishnavism has been always in existence, at least it is as old as Ramayana. Śrī Yōgīrāja Dēvarahā Bābā was an ageless Ramanandi Yogi-Bhakta Vaishnava in Jagadguru Ramanandacharya Parampara. and In Gita too, Lord himself asserts that among all devotees, he loves Yogi-Bhakta most! His age was a great mystery, as per his close devotees he was more than 500 years old and some believed he was friend of Goswami Tulsidas. About Amazing longevity of Devaraha Baba, Vincent J. Daczynski writes on his website ( https://www.amazingabilities.com/amaze7a.html ):- ” An Indian saint named Devraha Baba, who passed away in 1990, was a yogi who lived just such a lifestyle. Devraha Baba was from the spiritual heritage of the Avatar Ramanandacharya, and lived beside the Yamuna river in Mathura.

He lived on a 12-foot-high wooden platform where he usually remained stark naked. He never ate food. He only drank water from the Yamuna river. He claimed he could be in two places simultaneously (a siddhi described in Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras). He was observed to have stayed underwater unaided for half an hour.

He always radiated love. He was a Premaswarupa, an incarnation of love. He gave darshan (spiritual blessing) to devotees who came to pay homage. Many came to visit this great illustrious saint. People came from all over India and from all walks of life. He was a favorite among India’s senior politicians, and was visited by Mrs.

Indira and Mr. Rajiv Gandhi. Ministers, saints, yogis, priests, rich and poor all came for Baba’s darshan.” Vincent J. Daczynski writes further – ” It was rumored that Devraha Baba claimed that he had lived for over 700 years. Until I can substantiate this rumor I need to consider it just a rumor. Nevertheless, I make mention of this rumor because Devraha Baba’s family tree records place his age to be at least 250 years when he took mahasamadhi (relinquished his body) in 1990.

If he was able to live to be 250, then it is possible that he lived for 700 years as well. Baba was called, “The Ageless Yogi.” Devraha Baba gained mastery over the khecheri state of yoga whereby he was able to control his hunger and the time of his death.

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Dr. Rajendra Prashad, who was the first president of India, verified Devraha Baba’s old age. He said that he personally attests to Devraha Baba being at least 150 years old. He said that when he was 73 years old, his father took him to see Baba, who was a very old man, and that his father already had known Baba for many years before that.

An Allahabad High Court Barrister had stated that seven generations of his family had sat at the feet of Devraha Baba. Incidentally, Devraha Baba had predicted the time of his death five years in advance.” Though whatever was his reality, but no one can deny that he was a god realised soul, a great devotee of Lord Ram.

  • Shri Ram was his life and Ram Naam was his breath.
  • He had command over Vedas, Upanishads, Yog-sutras, RamayaNa, Ramcharitmanas and almost all Vedic-scriptures.
  • He was used to quote frequently from Ramcharitmanas, and Gita in order to explain divine teachings in simple words to devotees.
  • He never went outside his Ashram (hermitage) for making disciples, but it was common people who were attracted by his divine aura and used to go near to him to seek his blessings, to request to make themselves his disciples.

Devaraha baba never asked his devotees to write any book on him, rather he said devotees should read Ramcharitmanas to know the supreme truth. Baba used to shower his love on all devotees, be they were Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Sikhs or Parsis, belonging to different religions.

  1. Baba was a great accomplished Yogi, he had won over nature, he never used to eat anything, or wear any cloth even in extreme freezing cold! Though He was exclusively devoted to lord Ram but he loved Lord Krishna as well.
  2. He used to bestow Ram Mantra mostly but some times he used to bestow Krishna-Mantra and NarayaNa Mantra as like a true Ramanandi VaishNava.

As per Atharva-Veda, after attaining divinity like Devas a Yogi lives between earth and sky. So Devraha Baba used to live on a 12-foot-high (3.7 m) wooden platform near the famous Sarayu river and wore a small deerskin. A barricade of wooden planks hid his semi-naked body from his devotees, and he used to come down only to bathe in the river.

  1. Sitting on the wooden-platform, He used to bless devotees by touching their Sahastrar Chakra.
  2. He used to touch Sahastrar Chakra during Deeksha of Mantra (intiation), too.
  3. In same manner, he used to bless common people or even well-known people from societies who used to seek his blessings.
  4. Since Baba was Brahmarshi or Brahmleen Yogi, so there is no difference in touching Sahastrar Chakra either with hand or feet, if it is touched by a Brahmleen-Yogi.

In same manner Baba had blessed first President of India Dr. Rajendra Prasad, and other famous dignitaries like ex-Prime-ministers of India – Indra Gandhi, Vishwanath Pratap Singh, Rajiv-Gandhi, Atal-Bihari-Vajpayee etc by his feet. During British-India times, when India was not independent, many British officers were used to seek blessings of Devraha baba.

  1. About Devraha Baba, Dr.
  2. Ram naresh Tripathi writes: “In our century, Yogi Raj Devraha Baba emerges as a timeless figure, whose antecedents get lost in the remote past.
  3. Popular tradition holds him to be ageless.
  4. There is historical evidence of the British monarch, King George V, having had his darshan at Allahabad in 1910.

A host of presidents, prime ministers, rulers, lesser politicos and savants sought his sage counsel and benediction. It is all too well documented by newspaper reports to need recounting. His vast following encompassed people of diverse backgrounds and beliefs.

When he relinquished the body, termed an act of samadhi, on June 19, 1990, his disciples were disconsolate. They were so accustomed to his comforting presence that they suddenly found themselves adrift. He lived in their hearts, no doubt, but they still needed t o see him and talk to him. They should have remembered the master’s quiet assurance that the siddha yogi never dies.

“He is Eternity: he is forever more. he does not die when the body dies”. Since Devraha Baba was a great Yogi-bhakta of Lord Shri Rama, therefore on requests of saints and VHP he took the responsibility of leading the Shri Ram-Janmbhoomi movement to build the grand magnificent temple of Lord Shri Rama on his birth place.

  • There was a disputed structure built by a foreign invader Babur after demolishing a grand Shri Rama-temple once stood there on very site of Ram’s birth place.
  • Then Baba used to live on the bank of river Sarayu in Deoria, Uttar-Pradesh.
  • However to lead the movement, Baba didn’t hesitate to shift his location from Sarayu, Deoria to Yamuna, Vrindavana which was very near to National Capital of India, Delhi, so that he could talk and guide then prime-minister Rajiv Gandhi and other officers in Government of India on regular basis for a peaceful solution of Shri Rama-Janmbhoomi movement.

Baba, through his divine power, perceived well in advance that many devotees (Karsewaks) will be harmed by state machinery, and this happened in 1991 when devotees held protest in Ayodhya and demanded the removal of disputed structure to build the grand temple for their beloved Shri Rama.

How old is God in the Bible?

How Old Is God? – So how old is God? The Bible states that the everlasting God has no beginning or end. He existed long before we did. Since God has no beginning or end (Alpha and Omega), we cannot put an age to Him. Alpha (Α or α) and omega (Ω or ω) are the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet, We experience life in a linear fashion- meaning that things happen one after the other in chronological order.

Why can’t we live longer?

The first known record of humans on earth dates to over two million years ago. Through dedicated anthropological research, it is widely accepted that the earliest known record of humans is Homo habilis, originating from Africa between 2.4 to 1.4 million years ago.

Homo habilis could be our direct ancestors, but more anthropological research is needed to truly pin down humans’ prehistoric lineages. While it is hard to know what life could have possibly been like for these first humans, scientists from multiple disciplines are dedicated to piecing together the past to understand a full history of humankind’s origins.

From these humble origins, the population has grown both physically and cognitively. Technology, medicine, and transportation have boomed alongside the development of the human population. With increased innovation and understanding, the health care field has learned more about human health, well-being, and longevity throughout the years, causing human life expectancy to rise from 48 years in 1850 to 72.9 years in 2019.

Humans are living longer on average, but that does not necessarily mean that humans can live forever. Life expectancy vs. lifespan It would make sense that with medicine and technological advances, illness and disease are treatable, allowing us to live in better health for longer periods of time. But, the lines are not that clear.

Life expectancy and lifespan are two different factors of human well-being that measure longevity. Lifespan refers to the maximum number of years an individual can live, making lifespan unique to everyone. The longest recorded lifespan was Jeanne Calment who lived for 122 years and 5 months, making the maximum possible human lifespan 122 years and 5 months – that is, until someone outlives Calment.

Life expectancy, on the other hand, refers to the average age an individual can expect to live at different stages of life. As humans age, physical and cognitive challenges can emerge, making life expectancy a dynamic measurement that changes based on different experiences and lifestyles of an individual.

This does not mean that 48 years-old was considered “old” in say, the 1850s. But 48 was the average age that individuals could expect to live to during that time. It turns out that infant mortality rates sharply drive down the average life expectancy in a population (i.e., the number of child deaths in certain regions is so high that there are more childhood deaths than adult deaths, lowering life expectancy for that region).

You might think that, since our ability to safely manage childbirth and provide childcare has vastly improved since the 19 th century, then children would have a greater chance of surviving into adolescence and even older adulthood. While yes, this is true, and yes, it has certainly contributed to an increase in the human lifespan, humans have been living well into their 70s and 80 s since ancient times.

For instance, a first century writer, Pliny, dedicated a chapter of The Natural History to individuals who had lived the longest during that time. In the first century, three individuals had already lived to be 100. A third century B.C. tombstone read, “She was 80 years-old, but able to weave a delicate weft with the shrill shuttle.” Just like today, humans could live to 70, 80, or 90 years-old in ancient times, so has anything really changed? Can humans live forever? While the population can expect to live longer lives on average, the human lifespan might have a cap.

Scientists believe that the human lifespan could be anywhere from 120-150 years long, but not longer than that, due to accumulating hallmarks of aging and chronic disease. However, research suggests that expanding health span – the period of life that humans are in good health without the burden of disease – could help us live longer on average; though, much of maximizing our time here on earth depends on the choices we make in our day-to-day lives from a young age.

Our diet, exercise habits, smoking tendencies, mental health, and many more lifestyle factors all play a role in our overall health. By taking care of ourselves and living a healthier lifestyle, we can live healthier for longer, and aging can become a more gracious, gradual process that does not strip us of well-being.

Can someone live 200 years?

Human life span:

Humans’ life expectancy (average) is 70-85 years. However, the oldest verified person (Jeanne Clement, 1875-1997) lived up to 122 years. As a person ages, the telomeres (chromosome ends) tend to become shorter in every consecutive cycle of replication.Also, bones start getting weaker by reducing in size and density.In addition to this when a person starts getting old, muscles become less flexible (results in poor coordination and balance).These are natural changes that occur while aging. They cannot be stopped but it is possible to slow the rate of these processes.This can be done by changing one’s lifestyle (diet, exercise, etc). The science of aging is not yet fully understood; therefore, it is difficult to determine an absolute limit of 200 years.

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Has anyone lived in 3 centuries?

Margaret Ann Neve Guernsey supercentenarian (1792–1903) Margaret Ann Neve Margaret Ann Neve in July 1902 Born Marguerite Anne Harvey ( 1792-05-18 ) 18 May 1792, Died ( 1903-04-04 ) 4 April 1903(aged 110 years, 321 days) Brazil NationalityBritishKnown for

  • The first female supercentenarian
  • One of the first verified people that lived within three centuries (18th until the 20th century)
  • The oldest verified human born before the 19th century

SpouseJohn Neve (1823–1849; his death) Margaret Ann Neve ( Harvey, 18 May 1792 – 4 April 1903) was the first recorded female and the second validated human to reach the age of 110 after, Neve lived at on the island of in the, She was also the first proven individual whose life spanned three centuries (18th to the 20th centuries).

Is anyone alive born before 1900?

The two oldest living people in the world, American Susannah Mushatt Jones and Italian Emma Morano-Martinuzzi, were both born in 1899, making them the last living human links to the 1800s. The USA Today profiled both women back in June. Here are the oldest people in the world right now: Susannah Mushatt Jones; 6 July 1899; 116 years, 134 days Emma Morano-Martinuzzi; 29 November 1899; 115 years, 353 days Violet Brown; 10 March 1900; 115 years, 252 days Nabi Tajima; 4 August 1900; 115 years, 105 days Kiyoko Ishiguro; 4 March 1901; 114 years, 258 days Since it includes the entire year of 1900, the 19th century has four total survivors.

  1. A couple more years and our living connection to that era will be gone.
  2. Update: Susannah Mushatt Jones died in May 2016, leaving Emma Morano-Martinuzzi as the oldest living person as well as the last person alive who was born in the 1800s.
  3. Update: The NY Times, reporting on Jones’ death, contains a small error (italics mine): Mr.

Young said Ms. Jones’s presumed successor is a 116-year-old woman from Italy named Emma Morano. Ms. Morano, who was born in November 1899, is the last person alive who is verified to have been born in the 19th century. The next-oldest American, Mr. Young said, is “only 113.” Morano-Martinuzzi is indeed the last verified person to be born before 1900, but there are two others (Violet Brown and Nabi Tajima) who were born in the 19th century.

Since the first century AD began on Jan 1, 1 (and not 0) and ended on Dec 31, 100, each subsequent century follows the same pattern. So the 19th century includes the year 1900 (but “the 1800s” do not). If you’re interested enough to read further, Stephen J. Gould wrote a whole book about this issue back in 1997 called Questioning the Millennium,

Anyway, a little pedantry to annoy your loved ones with. Update: Emma Morano died on April 15, 2017, aged 117 years, 137 days. She was the last documented human born in the 1800s still alive and the fifth oldest person ever, She cooked for herself until she was 112, usually pasta to which she added raw ground beef.

  1. Until she was 115, she did not have live-in caregivers, and she laid out a place setting for herself at her small kitchen table at every meal.
  2. That leaves Violet Brown and Nabi Tajima as the last two living humans born in the 19th century.
  3. Update: And we’re down to one last living link to the 19th century.

Violet Brown has died at 117 years old, In an interview with the Jamaican Observer to celebrate her 110th birthday, she said her secrets to living to such an old age were eating cows feet, not drinking rum and reading the bible. “Really and truly, when people ask what me eat and drink to live so long, I say to them that I eat everything, except pork and chicken, and I don’t drink rum and them things,” she said.

death obituaries

Who was the last person born in 1900?

The last surviving human from the 19th century has died Nabi Tajima died yesterday at a hospital on the Japanese island of Kikaijima, according to the, Born Aug.4, 1900, she passed away at the age of 117 and 280 days, meaning she was was the last known person alive who had experienced the 19th century.

(1900 is the last year of that century rather than the first year of the 20th century.) Tajima lived through the introduction of technological marvels like cars, air travel, TV, space travel, computers, the Internet, and smartphones, as well as two world wars. When Tajima was born, an isolated and feudal Japan was ruled by Emperor Meiji.

Suffrage was limited; women in Japan only got the right to vote when she was around 45 years old. Tajima had nine children, and reportedly more than 160 descendants. According to, she said that her secret to health was “eating delicious things and sleeping well.” According to, the oldest person to have ever lived was a French woman named Jeanne Louise Calment, who died at age 122.

Who was the oldest man 1000 years?

Living to 1,000: The man who says science will soon defeat ageing Dr Aubrey de Grey is a Cambridge-affiliated biomedical gerontologist who believes ageing can be postponed for hundreds of years Ageing can be rendered almost irrelevant if we decode the genetic markers that pre-dispose us to illnesses Meet the man who believes that the first person to live to 1,000 years of age has already been born. Aubrey de Grey is one of the chief proponents of research utilising genomics to explore longevity.

An Englishman living in California, Dr de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist who co-founded the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) Research Foundation in 2009. It explores the use of regenerative medicine to repair the damage underlying the diseases of ageing. Doing so, it is hoped, will improve our ‘healthspan’ – the length of time for which we enjoy good health.

Dr de Grey is at the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Science and Policy as the chief scientific officer for the SENS Foundation. He received a BA in Computer Science in 1985 and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Cambridge in 2000, and organised a series of conferences on longevity in the city in 2003. Dr Aubrey de Greys theories on ageing are discussed in a wide variety of ways He tells the Cambridge Independent : “SENS Research Foundation has a couple of dozen employees and other dependents, such as PhD students who depend on us for their salaries.

  • Our mission is clear: the medical defeat of ageing via damage repair.” The longevity theory is essentially about preventing people from getting sick.
  • The model takes an engineering approach to human life.
  • The aim is to use rejuvenation biotechnologies directly to remove, repair, replace, or render harmless the cellular and molecular damage caused by the biological ageing process.

And if you can reduce the process of degradation to the point where it never crosses the threshold of causing a life-threatening disease, we could effectively defeat ageing – and live to 1,000, or perhaps longer. “The 1,000-year number is purely a ball-park estimate of the average lifespan – and even then, it’s in the context of today’s risk of death from causes that don’t arise from ageing, so it’s almost certainly very conservative,” Dr de Grey says. Genetic theory is revealing a number of insights about the human condition that would have been unthinkable even a few decades ago Would he want to live that long? “I don’t want to get sick, and I don’t expect ever to want to get sick, however long I live,” he replies.

  1. What I can’t imagine is ever basing my view of how bad it would be to get sick on how long ago I was born.
  2. As for what other people can imagine, well, that’s rather dictated by whether the media remind them that long life can and will only happen as a side-effect of staying truly youthful, as opposed to focusing on the longevity side-effect as if it were the goal in and of itself.” Explaining his motives for wanting to solve ageing in his TED Talk, Dr de Grey put it succinctly: “Getting frail and miserable and dependent is no fun.” He believes we’re in a trance if we believe otherwise.
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And he dealt with those who suggest living to 1,000 might be boring, cause starvation and put dictators in charge for ever, not to mention play havoc with our pensions, with this verdict on such arguments: “These are completely crazy when you remember your sense of proportion.

Are these so bad that they outweigh condemning 100,000 people a day to an unnecessarily early death?” What of overpopulation though? Dr de Grey acknowledges that humanity will face a dilemma. We’ll need to decide whether to have a low birth rate or maintain a high death rate by rejecting such therapies.

But there is a third way, he suggests. “I believe that we will reduce the impact of the average person on the environment far faster than we increase global population, even without continued reductions in birth rate.” So does he believe it would be possible to turn off the menopause? “The ovary is just another organ – and indeed there has already been plenty of progress in ovary reconstruction and rejuvenation,” he points out.

Failure to explore the potential of longevity, he argues, would be immoral. He describes ageing as the result of our metabolism – the hugely complex set of homeostatic processes that keep us alive from day to day – eventually causing pathology, the hugely complex set of anti-homeostatic processes that kill us.

In other words, our self-repair processes are not perfect. While geriatricians will look to deal with pathology and try to hold back the sands of time, gerontologists aim to work with metabolism on the basis that prevention is better than cure. Dr de Grey says we have discovered only seven types of damage that lead to pathology – such as cell loss and mutations in chromosomes.

In principle, he says we know how to fix these in mice with a range of techniques, like cell therapy, growth factors and the expression of proteins. Given sufficient funding, which he describes as the biggest challenge, he believes it will be possible to rejuvenate an ageing mouse within a decade. Fifteen years from that point, he argues the first therapies could be available within humans.

Bad news for 80-somethings: the initial experimental therapies we’re about to invent will be too late for you, he suggests. But if you’re only 50 “then there’s a chance you may be able to pull out of the dive”. And intriguingly, he believes the first person to live to be 1,000 will probably only be 10 years younger than the first 150-year-old.

It’s all about what I’ve called ‘longevity escape velocity’,” he tells us. This refers to the fact that ultimately technological advances will increase life expectancy more than the year that just went by. In other words, Dr de Grey is clear that we’re not about to invent some incredible therapy that will enable us live to 1,000.

But if we can deliver therapies that give a middle-aged person an extra 30 years of life expectancy, then by the time they get there, we’ll have further therapies to extend their life again. That’s how we’ll continue to stay ahead of the ageing process and, thanks to this incremental progress, he believes the first people who will live to 1,000 are already breathing.

There is considerable focus today on – changes in gene expression that don’t affect our underlying DNA code. So is this part of the plan? Not so much, apparently. “Epigenetic changes during ageing tend to be good things – deliberate changes that cells make, in order to minimise and delay the impact of other types of damage,” says Dr de Grey says.

“Our work focuses on eliminating that damage; once we do so, the epigenetic changes will become unnecessary and will probably reverse themselves spontaneously.” Nor is what we eat a particularly significant factor in defeating ageing, he suggests. “Diets are really not very important in all this.

One may be able to obtain a very modest postponement of ageing by dietary choices, but only very modest relative to just basically doing what your mother said – not getting seriously overweight, and being reasonably varied in terms of fruit and veg. I don’t follow any special diet,” he adds. Let’s assume he’s right, then, and humans start living to 1,000.

Won’t we run out of food for us all? “The elimination of age-related ill-health will not make problems for the food supply, because other technologies, such as renewable energy and artificial meat and desalination, will be well-established years before the end of ageing,” he suggests.

Has anyone lived to be 145 years old?

Mbah Gotho is the world’s oldest man alive. Now 145 years old, he readied his gravestone in 1992 itself and is tired of living any longer. – Photo: Twitter/@NooraniTejani Meet the oldest person alive in the world, Mbah Gotho from Indonesia, 145 years old. A document says he was born on December 31, 1870. At this age, Gotho’s only wish left is to die. He even got a gravestone made back in 1992, but of course, it never came handy.

He has outlived his ten siblings, four wives and children. Mbah Gotho has technically lived through two World Wars, the development of television, the modern motor car, aeroplanes and many other things which we taken for granted today. A local news network quoted him as saying, ‘What I want is to die.

My grandchildren are all independent.’ When asked about the secret to his longevity, he simply said, ‘the recipe is just patience.’ DnyanÄn en ya?lÄ insanÄ EndonezyalÄ Mbah Gotho.1870 doÄ?umlu, yani 145 ya?Ända. pic.twitter.com/M4OvI8FWW9 Hayri Baran (@okyanus_denizz) August 28, 2016 Over the past few months, Gotho has grown alarmingly frail and has needed to be bathed and spoon-fed. Photo: Twitter/@NooraniTejani If that happens Mbah Gotho will join the ranks of 171-year-old James Olofintuyi from Nigeria and 163-year-old Dhaqabo Ebba from Ethiopia. Published On: Aug 29, 2016 – ENDS –

Has anyone lived for 100 years?

Transcript – Dana Ferrante: Hey listeners, hope you had a great summer! We are so excited to be back in your feed. As we’ve been putting together this upcoming season, we realized we spent the last year hogging the mic. Now, we’re passing it to you. What questions have been on your mind? Is there a new policy that makes your head spin or a cultural phenomenon that you just don’t get? Maybe there’s a scientific quandary that a simple Google search won’t solve.

  1. Send us an email with your questions.
  2. You can find us at [email protected],
  3. We’d love to help you get some answers, and bonus points if you send us a voice memo.
  4. You can also find all this information in the show notes.
  5. Now on to the show.
  6. This is Question of the Week from BU Today,
  7. Today about one in every 5,000 people in the United States is a centenarian, or someone who is 100 or more years old; about 85 percent of them are women.

And while the odds aren’t great that we’ll all make it that far, the Census Bureau predicts that in about 40 years, the number of people who live to 100 could be six times as high. So, why do some people live to 100, and how? To learn more about it, in this episode BU Today executive editor Doug Most talks to Thomas Perls, a BU School of Medicine professor of geriatrics and director of BU’s New England Centenarian Study, the largest study of its kind in the world.

Thanks to the internet, we also discovered that Dr. Perls has created this life expectancy calculator based on his research. So we had Doug get an estimate. We figured that he’d want to discuss his results with Dr. Perls. Doug Most: Tom Perls, thanks for joining our podcast today. We’re going to talk about living to 100, and we’re going to talk about whether I want to live to 100.

What are you seeing out there right now in terms of how people are making adjustments or changes to their lifestyles? And I’m curious if you’re noticing any trends or patterns in how people are living and perhaps setting themselves up to grow and live longer lives.

  • Thomas Perls: First of all, thanks very much for having me.
  • Average life expectancy in the United States is not so great compared to other countries.
  • In the United States average life expectancy is about 77 years or so.
  • In other countries, it’s as high as 82 years.
  • And part of it, I’m afraid to say, is we are very much a country of haves and have nots.

And life expectancy is highly correlated with socioeconomic status, years of education, and access to good health care. For sure, there’s a big chunk of our population that has all those things, and there’s also many who do not, and it’s the many who do not that bring that average down.

And then there’s a segment of the population that we’ll talk about, where many of those things don’t seem to matter in terms of getting to really, really old age, which is pretty interesting. But another thing is, we still have many people in this country who smoke. In a place like Hong Kong, where advertising is practically nonexistent for tobacco, where there’s very, very strict rules about where one can smoke and a lot of education about the problems with smoking, the rates of smoking are very, very low.

And that probably plays a very big role in why their life expectancy is so high, at about almost 83 years. Most: Can you talk about this number 100 and how that became a magic number? And do we want people living to 100? When people get that old, is there a question about the strain on the health-care system and how those people are cared for, and I’m curious if that’s something that the study looks at.

  • Perls: We chose the number 100 and centenarians in part as a hook, and to describe, I think, pretty well, the people that we study.
  • We wanted to study a group that was very rare, and set itself apart from others in terms of how they age.
  • And really, what that boils down to is choosing that segment of the population that is about the one percentile of the oldest group in the population.

That would be women age 102 and men age 99, almost 100. So centenarians describes them pretty well. As far as why would you want to live to 100 if you wanted to—that was a really important question for us at the beginning of the study, which goes—I’m afraid to say—all the way back to about 1995, when I was a fellow in geriatrics at Harvard.

  1. And back then, in my training as a medical student, as a resident, the people that were the sickest it seemed were our oldest patients.
  2. And the ones that we worried about the most in terms of mortality, the idea of the older you get, the sicker you get, was very, very common among the lay public and even the medical community.

And so, if you thought the older you get, the sicker you get, then one would expect that everybody age 100 and older would have a myriad of age-related diseases and be on death’s doorstep. The first few centenarians I got to meet as a geriatrics fellow did not fit that bill at all—they were among my healthiest patients actually.

  1. One lady I remember, Celia, she was 102 and she was never around for me to go visit her at this independent living community.
  2. I thought maybe she was out seeing her doctors or something.
  3. But no, she was out playing piano at all kinds of gigs, and really complex Chopin.
  4. I mean, she was really one of the reasons for an epiphany, which was: well, if she was all that sick, how would she have gotten to this age? And that these individuals must have aged very slowly and had very little in the way of aging-related diseases, and from there on, we’ve studied more than 2,000 centenarians.

Most: So, I want to know Celia’s secret. What did Celia have that perhaps the rest of us wish we had? Is it genetics? Is it certain habits or her lifestyle that really helped her get to this age in such strong condition? How do I replicate what Celia got? Perls: One of the things we’ve learned is that these individuals have a long history of aging very, very slowly.

And they do delay any kind of disability towards the very end of their lives. Some of them have aging-related diseases, but they are highly resilient. And if they do have any aging-related diseases, like cardiovascular disease or stroke, even diabetes, or some kinds of cancers, I would say those don’t cause a problem for them.

They get to, on average, about age 94 and 95 without any disability, whereas other people either die of these diseases or they have long periods of disability before they die. And then, there’s a group who get to even older ages, 104, 105, who not only greatly delayed disability, but also age-related diseases.

  • Our crème de la crème folks are those who are 110 and older, what we call supercentenarians.
  • They are truly amazing in terms of, on average, being disability-free and living independently at the average age of—are you ready?—105.
  • Now that delay in disability, and then to some degree delay in aging-related diseases, especially something like Alzheimer’s disease, led to us turning this notion of the older you get, the sicker you get on its head.

And coming up with this idea, the older you get, the healthier you’ve been. And to address your question of how do you get there, I would say most of us, really on average, should be able to get pretty close, based upon our health behaviors, to an average of about age 90.

  1. That’s a lot, that’s 30 years beyond the age of 60, okay? That means you have maybe 40 years ahead of you if you do things right.
  2. Things like managing your stress really well.
  3. Eating right.
  4. And what I mean by eating right is have a diet that is conducive to what for you is a healthy weight.
  5. And then to some degree, I would say also avoiding meat, or removing as much meat out of your diet as possible, maybe having it once a week or something like that.

Certainly not smoking, that’s a biggie. Regular exercise. I think certainly exercising every day is important. Mixing it up, not just doing aerobic exercise, but also strength training gets even more important as we get older, it’s especially important that we maintain muscle.

  • Muscle has all kinds of benefits for people as they get older.
  • And if I’m asking too much, even just three times a week, it’s a heck of a lot better than none at all.
  • Last, I would say having the right genes and picking your parents or perhaps even your grandparents just right.
  • Now, how do we know doing everything right gets people to 90? And it isn’t so much from our New England Centenarian Study, but rather from the Seventh Day Adventist Health Study, which is a study of Seventh Day Adventists who have a religion that really believes that God has given us this wonderful body, and it would be a sin to squander that gift.

And so we need to take really good care of ourselves. Through that belief, they’ve developed really common sense guidelines of what you should be doing, and those are basically the things I said. They tend to be vegetarian, they don’t smoke, they don’t drink alcohol—maybe a little bit of alcohol is okay.

They regularly exercise. When they do eat, they tend to eat in moderation, so obesity tends to be relatively uncommon in this group. And they spend a lot of time with family and religion, which may help them manage their stress better. And lo and behold, average age in this group—even though it’s a very mixed group in terms of race, and ethnicity, and geographic location, even socioeconomic status—they, on average, get to 86 if you’re a man and 89, almost 90, if you’re a woman.

Most: Do more women tend to live longer, or does that not factor in? Perls: In terms of sex, women definitely win the longevity marathon by leaps and bounds. Only about 15 percent of centenarians are men, and the other 85 percent are women. Women age more slowly than men, they markedly delay things like cardiovascular disease and stroke compared to men.

Men tend to get those things in their 70s, and women tend to get those things in their 80s. And then there’s this subgroup that obviously goes on to much older age. Most: What is the trend right now? Are more people living longer? Are fewer people living longer? Which direction are we headed in? Perls: We just got through COVID; that was a huge hit to average life expectancy, where we’ve lost a million people due to COVID in the United States, probably the highest rate per capita in the world.

Aside from that hit, I think the United States average life expectancy is getting better in great part because of the decline in smoking. There are still areas where we can have a great deal of improvement, particularly in disadvantaged communities. And one of those areas is much better screening and treatment of high blood pressure.

  • In terms of the number of centenarians, that number has actually grown a great deal even since we started the study.
  • In the 1990s, about one per 10,000 in the population was a centenarian.
  • Now, it’s doubled, to one per 5,000.
  • Back in the early 1900s, average life expectancy was only about 50.
  • And much of that was because we lost so many people in infancy.

A lot of children were dying during birth, they were dying because of infectious diseases, dirty water supplies, poor socioeconomic conditions. So families could count on losing about a quarter of their children because of these problems. Then with clean water supply, years of education on average going up from 8 years to 12 years, much better socioeconomic conditions, and then later things like vaccines, a quarter more of the population was able to age.

  • And so, many more people were going on into adulthood.
  • You combine that with improvements in health care and socioeconomic conditions for people in middle age, and you get this combined effect of many more people who would have otherwise died having the opportunity to go on to be 100.
  • And so that’s why we’ve seen this doubling.
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But we’re starting to hit a plateau, I think. With all those improvements, maybe the prevalence of centenarians will continue to increase a bit from one per 5,000 to, who knows, maybe one per 3,000 or something like that—that’s to get to 100, 101. Getting much beyond 102 or so becomes so strongly genetic that beyond doing these really good health behaviors that might get you at least to 90, genetic influence—again, picking your parents or grandparents really well—becomes really important.

They say that getting to about age 90, 30 percent of that is going to be genetic, and 70 percent is going to be your health-related behaviors. By the time you look at getting to 110, it’s the opposite. It’s likely 70 percent is genetic, and 30 percent is these differences in our behaviors. Most: So I took the brief study that you have available— Perls: So that’s the livingto100.com life expectancy calculator.

Most: I consider myself a pretty healthy person. I don’t eat a lot of meat. I jog three, four days a week, I do have stress in my life, but that’s probably just because I have two teenagers. So I think that I was sort of hopeful that I would have a pretty good number, and it spit back at me that 88 was my magic number.

Perls: Did the calculator give you a little bit of feedback about where you had taken some hits? Most: There is some genetic history in my family. So my father has a history of heart disease, but he’s still alive today, and 85, and actually pretty healthy. So I think it said stress is something that I could try to work on.

And it mentioned the genetics. Those are two factors that are pretty hard to control for me— can’t get rid of my teenagers and can’t get rid of my genes. Perls: Now, don’t keep saying that about your wonderful children, who I am sure you absolutely love and adore.

  • Most: Perls: Yes, and I guess I would just say about stress: stress is not always bad.
  • It’s not the amount of stress that matters, it’s how you manage it that is key.
  • In fact, some people thrive on stress in terms of it being motivating.
  • Doing some things that are driven by stress can be very, very rewarding.

You usually know what it takes to decrease the things that stress makes you feel in a negative way. For me, that is regular exercise; for others, it may be meditation, or prayer, or yoga. And it’s a matter of you doing the things that you know work for you, and taking the time to do that.

  1. The thing about genes and whether people should be getting genetic tests or what have you, nobody should be doing that for now.
  2. All you have to do—and I apologize to people who are adopted and don’t know their family histories—really is just look at your own family history.
  3. We know that longevity runs in families, and remember that it’s not just genes that run in families, behaviors run in families too, including things like not smoking and years of education, socioeconomic status, things like that.

But just look at the family history. You fortunately know that there was some cardiovascular disease with your dad. Well, that makes it all the more important for you to see your doctor to check your blood pressure, check your cholesterol, and any other cardiovascular risk factors and minimize those.

And then you’re going to nip that in the bud, because fortunately, this day and age we have a lot of things in the toolbox to deal with cardiovascular disease that your dad may have not have even had access to at a substantially younger age. The fact that you did not claim some longevity in your family probably made a difference between whether you got to 100 versus more around age 90.

And then maybe there was a little something else that you’re just not admitting to us about because you’re too embarrassed. Most: Perls: But I would say that a really important thing that all of us need to do is to take stock of family history. If there’s colon cancer history in your family, you shouldn’t start getting screened at age 50.

You probably should start getting screened at age 35 or 40. Breast cancer other forms of cancer have a strong familial component. And don’t just shrug that off, that’s a really important clue for your own life expectancy and health. Most: What is next for the study? Where’s your focus? What are some of the things you hope to learn in the coming years? Perls: We just got a couple of pretty large grants from the National Institute on Aging that are pretty interested in generating, and actually sharing with investigators around the world, a lot more molecular data that is from blood samples and actually also stool samples to produce a lot more data.

Because this is a pretty unique population, there aren’t many studies like us, but they hold really important secrets. It’s not a matter of lacking genetic variants and other biological markers associated with disease. They have many of the same things as just the usual population.

  • What they have that is different is protective factors, things that actively protect you from the processes of aging and aging-related diseases.
  • And we want to discover those protective factors, believing that we may be able to translate those eventually into therapeutics and screening strategies that could help a lot more people not get to 100, but help them age better.

And hopefully, start doing things like markedly delaying, or even escaping, a disease like Alzheimer’s disease. As I said, we’re getting stool samples from our participants, so that we can look at the microbiome, looking at all the different bacterial populations they have.

  1. There’s a really important connection between the bacteria in our gut and things like whether or not we get Alzheimer’s disease and cardiovascular disease.
  2. These bacteria produce all kinds of important substances that get into our blood streams, and we in part produce things that are important for the bacteria.

It’s a really important symbiotic relationship and when things go awry, that can also lead to some aging-related diseases, and that’s becoming a very important topic. We do things like network analyses, can do some very complex analyses looking at the interaction of these different data to come up with what we call signatures, or fingerprints.

  1. And that can then be translated into understanding biological mechanisms or the underpinnings of this longevity.
  2. Again, it won’t just be us—the National Institute on Aging is expecting us to share these data on a web portal that is accessible to investigators around the world to hopefully greatly accelerate these discoveries.

Most: Tom Perls, the director of the New England Centenarian Study, I really appreciate you joining our podcast today, and we look forward to hearing more from you and from the study in the future. Perls: Thank you so much for having me. Ferrante: Thanks to Dr.

Perls for joining us on this episode of Question of the Week, To learn more about the New England Centenarian Study, be sure to check out the links in the show notes. If you want to figure out your own life expectancy, you can find the calculator at livingto100.com (that’s living to the number one hundred.com.) The calculator takes about 10 minutes and along with the results, it also gives you some suggestions on how to add years to your life.

This episode was hosted by BU Today executive editor Doug Most, engineered by Andy Hallock, and produced by me, Dana Ferrante. Thanks for listening, and see you in two weeks.

How many people have lived in 3 centuries?

Here are mini-biographies of the five people on Earth who have witnessed three centuries. The oldest person in the world hails from Japan, noted for its abundance of people who live beyond 100. And Misao Okawa is the oldest Japanese person ever.

Who was the oldest man 1000 years?

Living to 1,000: The man who says science will soon defeat ageing Dr Aubrey de Grey is a Cambridge-affiliated biomedical gerontologist who believes ageing can be postponed for hundreds of years Ageing can be rendered almost irrelevant if we decode the genetic markers that pre-dispose us to illnesses Meet the man who believes that the first person to live to 1,000 years of age has already been born. Aubrey de Grey is one of the chief proponents of research utilising genomics to explore longevity.

  • An Englishman living in California, Dr de Grey is a biomedical gerontologist who co-founded the SENS (Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence) Research Foundation in 2009.
  • It explores the use of regenerative medicine to repair the damage underlying the diseases of ageing.
  • Doing so, it is hoped, will improve our ‘healthspan’ – the length of time for which we enjoy good health.

Dr de Grey is at the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Science and Policy as the chief scientific officer for the SENS Foundation. He received a BA in Computer Science in 1985 and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Cambridge in 2000, and organised a series of conferences on longevity in the city in 2003. Dr Aubrey de Greys theories on ageing are discussed in a wide variety of ways He tells the Cambridge Independent : “SENS Research Foundation has a couple of dozen employees and other dependents, such as PhD students who depend on us for their salaries.

  • Our mission is clear: the medical defeat of ageing via damage repair.” The longevity theory is essentially about preventing people from getting sick.
  • The model takes an engineering approach to human life.
  • The aim is to use rejuvenation biotechnologies directly to remove, repair, replace, or render harmless the cellular and molecular damage caused by the biological ageing process.

And if you can reduce the process of degradation to the point where it never crosses the threshold of causing a life-threatening disease, we could effectively defeat ageing – and live to 1,000, or perhaps longer. “The 1,000-year number is purely a ball-park estimate of the average lifespan – and even then, it’s in the context of today’s risk of death from causes that don’t arise from ageing, so it’s almost certainly very conservative,” Dr de Grey says. Genetic theory is revealing a number of insights about the human condition that would have been unthinkable even a few decades ago Would he want to live that long? “I don’t want to get sick, and I don’t expect ever to want to get sick, however long I live,” he replies.

What I can’t imagine is ever basing my view of how bad it would be to get sick on how long ago I was born. “As for what other people can imagine, well, that’s rather dictated by whether the media remind them that long life can and will only happen as a side-effect of staying truly youthful, as opposed to focusing on the longevity side-effect as if it were the goal in and of itself.” Explaining his motives for wanting to solve ageing in his TED Talk, Dr de Grey put it succinctly: “Getting frail and miserable and dependent is no fun.” He believes we’re in a trance if we believe otherwise.

And he dealt with those who suggest living to 1,000 might be boring, cause starvation and put dictators in charge for ever, not to mention play havoc with our pensions, with this verdict on such arguments: “These are completely crazy when you remember your sense of proportion.

Are these so bad that they outweigh condemning 100,000 people a day to an unnecessarily early death?” What of overpopulation though? Dr de Grey acknowledges that humanity will face a dilemma. We’ll need to decide whether to have a low birth rate or maintain a high death rate by rejecting such therapies.

But there is a third way, he suggests. “I believe that we will reduce the impact of the average person on the environment far faster than we increase global population, even without continued reductions in birth rate.” So does he believe it would be possible to turn off the menopause? “The ovary is just another organ – and indeed there has already been plenty of progress in ovary reconstruction and rejuvenation,” he points out.

  • Failure to explore the potential of longevity, he argues, would be immoral.
  • He describes ageing as the result of our metabolism – the hugely complex set of homeostatic processes that keep us alive from day to day – eventually causing pathology, the hugely complex set of anti-homeostatic processes that kill us.

In other words, our self-repair processes are not perfect. While geriatricians will look to deal with pathology and try to hold back the sands of time, gerontologists aim to work with metabolism on the basis that prevention is better than cure. Dr de Grey says we have discovered only seven types of damage that lead to pathology – such as cell loss and mutations in chromosomes.

  1. In principle, he says we know how to fix these in mice with a range of techniques, like cell therapy, growth factors and the expression of proteins.
  2. Given sufficient funding, which he describes as the biggest challenge, he believes it will be possible to rejuvenate an ageing mouse within a decade.
  3. Fifteen years from that point, he argues the first therapies could be available within humans.

Bad news for 80-somethings: the initial experimental therapies we’re about to invent will be too late for you, he suggests. But if you’re only 50 “then there’s a chance you may be able to pull out of the dive”. And intriguingly, he believes the first person to live to be 1,000 will probably only be 10 years younger than the first 150-year-old.

“It’s all about what I’ve called ‘longevity escape velocity’,” he tells us. This refers to the fact that ultimately technological advances will increase life expectancy more than the year that just went by. In other words, Dr de Grey is clear that we’re not about to invent some incredible therapy that will enable us live to 1,000.

But if we can deliver therapies that give a middle-aged person an extra 30 years of life expectancy, then by the time they get there, we’ll have further therapies to extend their life again. That’s how we’ll continue to stay ahead of the ageing process and, thanks to this incremental progress, he believes the first people who will live to 1,000 are already breathing.

  • There is considerable focus today on – changes in gene expression that don’t affect our underlying DNA code.
  • So is this part of the plan? Not so much, apparently.
  • Epigenetic changes during ageing tend to be good things – deliberate changes that cells make, in order to minimise and delay the impact of other types of damage,” says Dr de Grey says.

“Our work focuses on eliminating that damage; once we do so, the epigenetic changes will become unnecessary and will probably reverse themselves spontaneously.” Nor is what we eat a particularly significant factor in defeating ageing, he suggests. “Diets are really not very important in all this.

One may be able to obtain a very modest postponement of ageing by dietary choices, but only very modest relative to just basically doing what your mother said – not getting seriously overweight, and being reasonably varied in terms of fruit and veg. I don’t follow any special diet,” he adds. Let’s assume he’s right, then, and humans start living to 1,000.

Won’t we run out of food for us all? “The elimination of age-related ill-health will not make problems for the food supply, because other technologies, such as renewable energy and artificial meat and desalination, will be well-established years before the end of ageing,” he suggests.

Who lived the longest in the Bible?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Methuselah
Stained glass window of Methuselah from the southwest transept of Canterbury Cathedral in Kent, England
Born 687 AM
Died 1656 AM (aged 969)
Known for Exceptionally long life
Spouse Edna
Children Lamech and other sons and daughters
Parent

Enoch (father)

Methuselah (; Hebrew : מְתוּשֶׁלַח ‎ Məṯūšélaḥ, in pausa מְתוּשָׁלַח ‎ Məṯūšālaḥ, “His death shall send” or “Man of the javelin ” or “Death of Sword”; Greek : Μαθουσάλας Mathousalas ) was a biblical patriarch and a figure in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam,

  1. He had the longest lifespan of all those given in the Bible, having died at the age of 969.
  2. According to the Book of Genesis, Methuselah was the son of Enoch, the father of Lamech, and the grandfather of Noah,
  3. Elsewhere in the Bible, Methuselah is mentioned in genealogies in 1 Chronicles, Genesis, and the Gospel of Luke,

His life is described in further detail in other texts such as the Book of Enoch, Slavonic Enoch, and the Book of Moses, Bible commentators have offered various explanations as to why the Book of Genesis describes him as having died at such an advanced age; some believe that Methuselah’s age is the result of a mistranslation, while others believe that his age is used to give the impression that part of Genesis takes place in a very distant past.

How old was Lucile Randon?

Health and longevity – Randon was blind and used a wheelchair from the early 2010s. In January 2021, she tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in an outbreak at her retirement home. She was asymptomatic and tested negative days before her 117th birthday, making her the oldest known survivor of the COVID-19 pandemic,

After the death of Honorine Rondello on 19 October 2017, she became the oldest living person in France. When she turned 115 in 2019, Pope Francis sent her a personal letter and blessed rosary, In 2021, she said she was happy at her home, although she wished to join her grandparents and brother André in heaven,

On her 118th birthday in February 2022, Randon received a birthday note from the French president, Emmanuel Macron, On 19 April 2022, she became the world’s oldest verified living person after the death of Kane Tanaka, She felt this was a “sad honour”, saying: “I feel I would be better off in heaven, but the good Lord doesn’t want me yet.” At that time she was reported to still eat chocolate and drink a glass of wine each day.