The Man Who Sold The World? - [] 2024: CLT Livre

The Man Who Sold The World?

Who originally sang The Man Who Sold the World?

References –

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Sources

  • Buckley, David (1999). Strange Fascination – David Bowie: The Definitive Story, Virgin Books, ISBN 978-1-85227-784-0,
  • Cann, Kevin (2010). Any Day Now – David Bowie: The London Years: 1947–1974, Adelita. ISBN 978-0-95520-177-6,
  • Carr, Roy ; Murray, Charles Shaar (1981). Bowie: An Illustrated Record, Eel Pie Pub. ISBN 978-0-38077-966-6,
  • Doggett, Peter (2012). The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s, HarperCollins Publishers, ISBN 978-0-06-202466-4,
  • O’Leary, Chris (2015). Rebel Rebel: All the Songs of David Bowie from ’64 to ’76, UK: Zero Books, ISBN 978-1-78099-244-0,
  • Pegg, Nicholas (2016). The Complete David Bowie (7th ed.). London: Titan Books, ISBN 978-1-78565-365-0,
  • Perone, James (2007). The Words and Music of David Bowie, Greenwood Publishing Group. ISBN 978-0-27-599245-3,
  • Spitz, Marc (2009). Bowie: A Biography, New York: Crown Publishing Group, ISBN 978-0-307-71699-6,

What means The Man Who Sold the World?

Behind the Meaning of “The Man Who Sold the World” by David Bowie You’re face to face with the man who sold the world! It’s an eerie, jarring lyric. One befit of the Halloween season. Terrorizing and horrifying. But what does it mean? Written by David Bowie and made globally famous by Kurt Cobain and Nirvana, “The Man Who Sold the World,” is rich with thought and musical prowess.

  1. Let’s dive into the history and the meaning of the song below.
  2. Written by Bowie, the song is the titular song to the British artist’s third album, released in 1970 in the United States and six months later in the U.K.
  3. According to lore, Bowie recorded his looming, outer-space-like vocal for the song on the final day of mixing the album.

The song’s music revolves around a guitar riff from six-string player Mick Ronson. But its lyrics are thoughtful and create a sense of impending doom. They were inspired by poems, including the 1899 “Antigonish” by writer William Hughes Mearns. Despite its, the song was largely forgotten after its release in the early ’70s.

It was never shared as a single by Bowie. In 1973, the song was covered by the Scottish artist Lulu and that 1974 version, which was produced by Bowie and Ronson and had a more vaudevillian feel, hit No.3 on the U.K. singles chart. More recently, in 1993, Cobain covered the song in the band’s now-famous MTV Unplugged release, featuring acoustic instruments.

The song’s original recording, however, featured Bowie on acoustic, Ronson on electric guitar, Tony Visconti on bass, Woody Woodmansey on drums, and Ralph Mace on Moog synth. And according to Chris O’Leary, Bowie wrote the lyrics for the song in the reception area of the recording studio while Visconti waited in the mixing booth.

  1. Once finished, Bowie quickly recorded his verses with Visconti adding a “flange” effect and then mixing the song right then.
  2. Of the last-minute writing, a frustrated Visconti said in 1977, “This was the beginning of new style of writing—’I can’t be bothered until I have to’.
  3. When it was finished, on the last day of the last mix, I remember telling David, ‘I’ve had it, I can’t work like this anymore—I’m throughDavid was very disappointed.” Visconti’s frustration wasn’t creative as much as practical, worrying about budget and schedule.

Of the sessions, Bowie told BBC in 1976, “It was a nightmare, that album. I hated the actual process of making it.” In terms of the song’s meaning, the track comes in a lineage of prominent work titled “The Man Who Sold” whether talking about the moon in a sci-fi novella or the Earth in a 1954 DC comic book.

  1. There is also the 1968 Brazilian satire, The Man Who Bought the World,
  2. For Bowie, whose song isn’t necessarily thematically connected to these works, the feeling of the song has a sense of annoyance with himself for letting his world be rocked by fame.
  3. He’s given up his privacy, his control.
  4. His private life is public now.

In this way, he’s the man who sold himself out. There are many possible interpretations of the larger theme and the smaller details of the song—Lulu herself once confessed she had no idea what the song meant—but some believe the song has to do with a distracted ignorance of what’s happening around the singer.

But perhaps that meeting is only in his mind, since his “twin,” of sorts, “died alone, a long, long time ago.” While the song has been covered by hundreds of artists, from Lulu to your next-door neighbor, the most well-known rendition of the song today is by Kurt Cobain and Nirvana in their MTV Unplugged session.

In his journal, Cobain ranked the album from which the song appears at No.45 of his top 50 favorites. Seattle drummer Chad Channing introduced Cobain to the record. Instead of playing their commercial hits for the MTV show, Nirvana went with more obscure songs, including lesser-known covers.

The MTV version peaked at No.3 on the channel’s most-played videos in 1995. “I was simply blown away when I found that Kurt Cobain liked my work, and have always wanted to talk to him about his reasons for covering ‘The Man Who Sold the World'” and that “it was a good straight forward rendition and sounded somehow very honest,” Bowie said of the Nirvana cover.

“It would have been nice to have worked with him, but just talking with him would have been real cool.” He also said the song was “heartfelt” and “until this, it hadn’t occurred to me that I was part of America’s musical landscape. I always felt my weight in Europe, but not,” Bowie later shared that he would play the song at his shows and younger fans would say it was cool he was playing a Nirvana song.

Did David Bowie cover The Man Who Sold the World?

Emel Mathlouthi – 2020 – One of the most captivating renditions of ‘The Man Who Sold the World’ came in 2020 courtesy of Tunisian singer-songwriter Emel Mathlouthi. The slow, brooding cover is wholly focused on Mathlouthi’s haunting vocals that flow powerfully over a bed of shimmering piano melody.

Why did Kurt Cobain cover The Man Who Sold the World?

One Great Cover looks at the greatest cover songs ever, and how they got to be that way. “I didn’t screw it up, did I?” Kurt Cobain, November 18, 1993 ” The Man Who Sold the World ” is a David Bowie narrative song concerned with, not the anguish of spaceflight, but the anguish of a fractured personality. Yet few people noticed when it was released in 1970 on the poor-selling album of the same name, as the singer struggled to follow through on the success of his “Space Oddity” hit of 1969.

  1. It wasn’t released as a single.
  2. And it was soon vastly overshadowed by the mighty glam-rock chart attack that came of Bowie doppelgangers Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane: ” Starman,” “John, I’m Only Dancing,” “The Jean Genie.” It was Scottish singer Lulu who scored a hit with “The Man Who Sold the World” in 1974, even though, as she later confessed, she “had no idea what it meant.” She could be forgiven for her lack of understanding in performing it, perhaps, because beneath the phased and compressed vocals of the eerie original were dreamlike depictions of figures speaking “of was and when,” gazing “gazeless stares,” and walking “a million hills,” after having died alone a “long, long time ago.” She was certainly a long way from singing “My heart goes boom bang-a-bang, boom bang-a-bang-bang” at the 1969 Eurovision Song Contest.

But she had the powerful voice, if not the conviction, to just about pull it off. She also had Bowie himself on backing vocals and saxophone, producing the song along with his bandmate, Mick Ronson, on guitar. Lulu therefore postured her way through Bowie’s enigmatic song in the process of bridging the world of British variety (guest spots on the Morecambe & Wise Show, TV specials with Bruce Forsyth) and the world of glam-rock.

She was richly rewarded, too, with her first top 10 hit in the UK in five years. But could it be said that fellow Scot Midge Ure understood the song better on his cover of 1982? The bow-tie-wearing synthpop pioneer and singer, on a break from his Ultravox and Visage duties, recorded “The Man Who Sold the World” solo for the soundtrack of British comedy film Party Party,

It was fitting that he should do so, Bowie being the icon of the New Romantic movement he and his Visage collaborators, Steve Strange and Rusty Egan, instigated around the Blitz nightclub in London. He wrapped the surreal drama of the song in noirish and futuristic clothes, care of his robotic baritone and his cold-as-steel electronics.

In doing so, he assimilated the track into the contemporary synth tradition of dystopian pop songs that ran from Tubeway Army ‘s “Are Friends Electric?” to John Foxx’s “Underpass” to, well, Ultravox’s “Sleepwalk.” Even if it didn’t really belong there. In contrast, English psychedelic band Here & Now demonstrated that the Bowie track could be reinterpreted as some kind of quirky ghost story, with the breezy, ska-style makeover they released in 1983.

But what came as some surprise, ten years later, was a stripped-back, rustic, and deadly serious version of the song on MTV Unplugged, featuring a gravel-voiced American singer. It took a while to sink in but, yes, the biggest rock group in the world, renowned for their loud, honest, punk-influenced sound, had really performed an acoustic version of the little-known song by an artist, lest we forget, renowned for artifice, reinvention, and theatricality.

And it was easily the best version yet. Because the rock group in question, Nirvana, seemed to know exactly what it was about. The Seattle band, having just released their visceral third studio album In Utero, certainly didn’t score the greatest-ever cover of “The Man Who Sold the World” out of contrivance.

They followed the lead of their alt-rock mentors R.E.M. and grunge rivals Pearl Jam by appearing on the premier MTV show in New York in November 1993. They further knew this required them to sit down to play quiet versions of some well-chosen originals, alongside covers fans might not expect, from genres they might not expect, in a big display of musical authenticity.R.E.M.

  • Threw into their set a flower-power song they loved by British garage band The Troggs: “Love Is All Around.” Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain similarly threw in a song he loved by Bowie.
  • He had, after all, ranked its parent LP at #45 in his top 50 favorite albums in his Journals,
  • Nirvana grouped “The Man” with other first-person songs such as “Come As You Are,” “Pennyroyal Tea,” “All Apologies,” “Jesus Doesn’t Want Me For A Sunbeam,” and ” Where Did You Sleep Last Night? ” Some of them were written by Cobain, but all of them became about Cobain: the tormented and paranoid rock star, hellishly weary of his fame, his heroin addiction, his chronic ill health, and his assigned role as “voice of a generation.” After a “screw-up” or two in rehearsal, they played the Bowie number not only quietly but brilliantly, with Cobain accentuating the eeriness of the original by making his acoustic guitar howl and whine through a fuzzbox in some unholy kind of way.
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Cellist Lori Goldston also added to the spectral atmosphere with her playing. But there was no doubt that the crux of the matter lay in Kurt internalizing the lyrics and expressing his inner pain through the song, in a way that seemed to illuminate its essential meaning.

Cobain sang the track like someone broken, hopeless, and haunted. He inhabited the role of the narrator who’s shocked to confront a part of himself he thought lost, at the moment he comes “face to face with the man who sold the world.” Perhaps, to Kurt, the man who sold the world was his younger self, who unwittingly sold his soul when he unleashed Nevermind and became an international youth icon, a mainstream figure, public property, and all the rest.

Perhaps the loss of part of himself was the reason for his psychological turmoil and feelings of alienation, which he poured into the lines: “I searched for form and land / For years and years I roamed.” Perhaps, too, it was exactly as Bowie had said of his standpoint in the song in 1997: “when you know that there’s a piece of yourself that you haven’t really put together yet,” and “You have this great searching, this great need to find out who you really are.” Many have tied themselves up in knots trying to explain Bowie’s cryptic lyrics in relation to Cobain, but there can be no question that “The Man Who Sold the World” became “a Nirvana song” as soon as the band’s extraordinary MTV performance aired in December 1993.

The group made it even more their own by playing it (loud) at 31 live shows up until Cobain’s suicide in April ’94, when it found an indelible place in their legacy. The release of the track on the MTV Unplugged in New York album in November 1994 only confirmed its status, as well as its inclusion on Nirvana’s self-titled “best of” compilation in 2002.

The song was no longer a glam-rock song or a New Romantic song. It was a grunge song, pure and simple. Who was this David Bowie guy, anyway? Bowie himself got to see this ch-ch-change in perception, and talked with good humor about how, when he played “The Man Who Sold the World” in concert, “kids would come up afterwards and say, ‘It’s cool you’re doing a Nirvana song.’ And I’d think, ‘Fuck you, you little tosser!'” Cover Me is now on Patreon! If you love cover songs, we hope you will consider supporting us there with a small monthly subscription.

Who is the biggest selling singing artist of all time?

250 million or more records

Artist Country Claimed sales
The Beatles United Kingdom 600 million 500 million
Elvis Presley United States 500 million
Michael Jackson United States 400 million
Elton John United Kingdom 300 million 250 million

Who is the highest selling musical artist of all time?

Top-selling artists worldwide as of 2022 Perhaps unsurprisingly, British rock band The Beatles are top of the list for best-selling artists worldwide, with 183 million units certified sales. Second is Garth Brooks with over 157 million units sales, followed by Elvis Presley with 139 million units.

How many personalities did David Bowie have?

How many different personas did David Bowie have? – While there isn’t a definitive number of characters that Bowie has – as previously stated, the lines are often blurred between them – Bowie had at least five different characters. These include Ziggy Stardust, Aladdin Sane, Halloween Jack, the Thin White Duke, and his very last character which made a few music video appearances for a couple of the tracks off Black star – the Blind Prophet.

Who is called man of the world?

If you say that someone is a man of the world or a woman of the world, you mean that they are experienced and know about the practical or social aspects of life, and are not easily shocked by immoral or dishonest actions.

What did David Bowie think of Nirvana’s cover?

‘It’s cool you’re doing a Nirvana song.’ And I think, ‘F*ck you, you little tosser!” – David Bowie’s brilliantly wicked reaction to kids who would come up and congratulate him on his song cover choice after hearing him play The Man Who Sold The World.

He made the mould and then he broke the mould. And then he did the same thing all over again. His songs are complex and not an easy cover. When Rick Wakeman who played piano on Life On Mars heard it for the first time he was astonished by the chord changes throughout, but particularly on the lines “But the film is a saddening bore” and “Sailors! Fighting In The Dancehall”.

There’s a good reason X-Factor auditionees don’t cover him. But many great artists have taken on the challenge and here are seven pearls ******* Seu Jorge is a massive Bowie fan and has covered several of his songs. Turns out Bowie liked what Jorge did and wrote, “Had Seu Jorge not recorded my songs acoustically in Portuguese, I would never have heard this new level of beauty which he has imbued them with,” he wrote in the liner notes for Jorge’s 2005 album The Life Aquatic Studio Sessions,

Bowie really dug this cover as well saying, “”I was simply blown away when I found that Kurt Cobain liked my work, and have always wanted to talk to him about his reasons for covering ‘The Man Who Sold the World’.” He was less enamoured by the “kids that come up afterwards and say, ‘It’s cool you’re doing a Nirvana song.’ And I think, ‘Fuck you, you little tosser!” Legend has it that Commander Chris Hadfield had to chose between Space Oddity and Babylon Zoo’s, Spaceman for the first music video recorded from space – aboard the International Space Station.

That choice only happened inside my head but all the same, Commander Hadfield chose wisely. Bowie sang backing vocals on Province from the band’s 2006 album Return To Cookie Mountain. The Thin White Duke requested they cover Heroes and you don’t turn the great man down.

  • In 2007, while still studying at DCU, Armagh artist, Paula Flynn recorded a version of David Bowie’s Let’s Dance which found its way into the hands of Ballygowan advertising executives.
  • The whispery vocal delivery made its way onto the advert.
  • The inevitable “Who’s the girl singing the Bowie song?” soon followed and after EMI released it, it went on to top the Irish charts.

Backed by a 157-piece orchestra conducted by his own father, the composer and arranger David Campbell, Beck produces an epic nine minute cover version of the 1977 Sound And Vision. Not for the faint-hearted. Blondie covered the Bowie classic in concert in 1980 and released it as a single in Germany the same year.

Was Kurt Cobain a Bowie fan?

Nirvana members teamed up with Beck to cover David Bowie’s ‘Man Who Sold The World’

In 1993, appeared on MTV Unplugged, defying all expectations by playing both their and other artists’ lesser known work, and definitely not ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’.Soon after the show aired, the album was released, going straight to number one in the US, and with it renewing interest in David Bowie’s third album, ‘The Man Who Sold the World’.Nirvana had, of course, covered the titular song from the album during the sessions, Kurt Cobain having always been a massive Bowie fan.

Years later, during a Grammy Awards pre-gala in Los Angeles, the surviving members of the band (, Krist Novoselic and Pat Smear) joined by Beck to revisit the song, paying tribute to the late Starman. Watch the group’s performance above. Cobain was known at school as the intelligent student with a Snoopy lunchbox Charles Peterson Kurt Cobain began playing drums in his school band but his music director remembered him as pretty average talent-wise Charles Peterson Cobain reportedly told a schoolmate aged 14 that he would become a rich and famous rock star before killing himself and going out in a blaze of glory like Jimi Hendrix Steve Double Nirvana flip some birds on a photoshoot Charles Peterson Kurt Cobain, here seen crowd-surfing at a Vancouver gig, got the name for ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ from a woman’s deodorant brand which came in ‘Rose’, ‘Baby Powder’ and ‘California’ Charles Peterson Kurt Cobain spelled his name in a variety of ways at different stages: Curt Cobain, Kurdt Kobain, Kurdt Kobane.

Charles Peterson Kurt Cobain pulls a rock star move with his guitar on stage at Vancouver’s Commodore Ballroom. Charles Peterson Kurt Cobain’s favourite movie ever was Matt Dillon’s drama ‘Over the Edge’ Steve Double Kurt Cobain, here on stage with Nirvana preparing to smash his guitar, cited The Beatles and The Melvins as his two favourite bands Steve Double Kurt Cobain, here seen playing with Nirvana at Reading Festival, was no stranger to suicide.

Several took place within his own family and aged 13 he found a corpse hanging from a tree outside his school Charles Peterson Kurt Cobain crouches in a corner at the Beehives Records Nevermind release Charles Peterson The welcome sign for Aberdeen, Washington, where Kurt Cobain is from now reads ‘Welcome to Aberdeen, come as you are’ Steve Double Cobain always spelled his band’s name in capital letters: NIRVANA Steve Double Kurt Cobain was reportedly listening to REM’s Automatic for the People when he took his own life at his home in Washington Steve Double Kurt Cobain wears a t-shirt reading ‘Hi, how are you’ for this photoshoot with Nirvana Steve Double Dave Grohl recently revisited his Nirvana days when he who played the young girl in the band’s ‘Heart Shaped Box’ music video.

Why was David Bowie a big deal?

4. Revolutionary and founder of glam rock – This Brit, David Bowie, revolutionized the world of music. At first he quietly triumphed and became world famous with his alter ego Ziggy Stardust he became the impressionist personified in pop culture. It created a symbiosis between pop, rock, psychedelia, folk and other styles. The result was an incredible crossover: glam rock. By loading the video, you agree to YouTube’s privacy policy. Learn more Load video Always unblock YouTube

Did David Bowie know Elton John?

19 April 2023, 13:25 David Bowie and Elton John took ‘star power’ to a whole new level. So why did they stop being friends so suddenly? Picture: Getty They were both two of the 1970s biggest music stars. When David Bowie and Elton John introduced their music to the world, people drew comparisons with them almost immediately.

  • Because of Bowie’s debut single ‘ Space Oddity ‘ and Elton’s classic hit ‘ Rocket Man ‘, the pair captured the imagination of fans who were obsessed with the opportunities and optimism of space travel.
  • Though they were incredibly different artists in reality, their outer space-themed tracks weren’t the only thing the two shared.

Both had a penchant for standing out by wearing outlandish clothing – David with his Ziggy Stardust character, and Elton with his glitzy, colourful costumes.

The Story of. ‘Rocket Man’ by Elton John How David Bowie discovered soul icon Luther Vandross and helped kickstart his career 7 amazing John Lennon cover versions by David Bowie, Elton John and more David Bowie’s 20 greatest ever songs, ranked

So you could understand why it wouldn’t be long before the two would be introduced, and eventually struck up a friendship. “We started out being really good friends” Elton once explained, saying: “We used to hang out together with Marc Bolan, going to gay clubs.” It sounds like they were a great match for a long-term friendship. David Bowie talking to Princess Diana in the audience at Live Aid in 1985, with Elton John seated some distance away. Picture: Getty Well, as history has explained to us, Elton has never been someone to bite his tongue when conflict arises. So you might immediately think that any falling out between him and David Bowie would’ve been started by Elton.

  • Shortly after they began to bond with one another, Bowie moved to Los Angeles and made a series of unwarranted remarks about the ‘ Tiny Dancer ‘ singer.
  • Safe to say, it riled up Elton who had nothing but respect for the ‘ Starman ‘, but seemingly any sort of friendship they’d struck up was on the rocks several years later.

“Years later, he’d always make snippy remakes about me in interviews,” John recalled. “‘The token queen of rock and roll’ was the most famous one, although, in fairness, he was absolutely out of his mind on coke when he said it.” David made things a bit more obvious in another interview when he addressed Elton directly, saying: “I consider myself responsible for a whole new school of pretensions — they know who they are. Despite their frosty interaction at Live Aid, David and Elton were very chummy during rehearsals for the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert in 1992. Picture: Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd. “I thought it was a bit snooty. He wasn’t my cup of tea” said Elton of David. Picture: Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd. The change of heart dumbfounded Elton, who later said: “I honestly don’t know what the problem was, but there clearly was a problem.” “I was never great friends with Bowie.

I loved his music and we socialised a couple of times, visiting the Sombrero with Tony King and having dinner together in Covent Garden while he was rehearsing for the Ziggy Stardust tour.” “But there was always something distant and aloof about him, at least when I was around” Elton confirmed. Despite the similarities from the outside, they clearly weren’t as alike as people expected or hoped, and David ensured he was distanced from Elton.

There was suspicions that David thought Elton was trying to imitate him – people believed ‘Rocket Man’ to be influenced by David’s debut single ‘Space Oddity’, although that wasn’t actually the case according to the song’s co-writer Bernie Taupin. Elton has never been a character to suffer any fools however, later saying: “I thought it was a bit snooty. RARE MOMENT ALERT! Elton John and David Bowie Talk at Freddie Mercury Tribute Rehearsal with Queen “David and I were not the best of friends towards the end” Elton said, admitting that he thought David believed he was “above” the ‘ Your Song ‘ icon. Sadly, the pair never buried the hatchet before Bowie lost his battle with cancer in 2016.

But Elton was full of admiration for David in the wake of his death. “The dignified way he handled his death, I mean, thank God. I knew he’d had a heart attack on stage in Berlin years ago, but not about the cancer”, Elton told the Evening Standard months after David died. “Everyone else take note of this: Bowie couldn’t have staged a better death.

It was classy.”

How David Bowie seduced Tina Turner by wearing nothing but a wig David Bowie’s daughter Lexi shares adorable video of her dad teaching her piano Kate Bush’s rare haunting cover of Elton John’s classic ballad ‘Candle In The Wind’ remembered Elton John’s 20 greatest ever songs, ranked

He recalled when his husband David Furnish broke the news to him. At 03:00 in the morning: “It was 3am and the phone rang. It was David, I immediately panicked, as when you get a phone call at three o’clock in the morning you think something is wrong.” “I thought of the kids, something has happened to the kids. Elton John Tribute to David Bowie

Why did the guy sue Nirvana?

Lawsuit Accusing Nirvana of Sexually Exploitive Imagery Is Dismissed (Published 2022) Spencer Elden, who was pictured naked as a baby on the cover of “Nevermind,” said Nirvana had engaged in “child pornography.” Spencer Elden, who was pictured as a baby on the album cover of Nirvana’s “Nevermind,” posed several times as an adult to recreate the photo. Credit. John Chapple/SplashNews.com A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by a man who said he had been sexually exploited by the grunge rock group Nirvana when the band used a photo of him as a baby, naked and drifting in a pool, for the cover of its seminal album “Nevermind.” In his complaint, the man, Spencer Elden, 30, accused Nirvana of engaging in child pornography when it used a photo of him as the cover art of “Nevermind,” the Seattle band’s breakthrough 1991 album that helped define Generation X and rocketed the group to international fame.

The lawsuit was dismissed after a judge in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California said that Mr. Elden’s lawyers missed a deadline to respond to a motion for dismissal by the lawyers for Nirvana. Judge Fernando M. Olguin said that Mr. Elden’s lawyers had until Jan.13 to file a second amended complaint to address “the alleged defects” in the defendants’ motion to dismiss.

Robert Y. Lewis, one of Mr. Elden’s lawyers, said they would file the complaint well before the deadline. He said the missed deadline was a result of “confusion” over how much time they had to respond to the motion for dismissal. “We feel confident that our amended complaint will survive an expected motion to dismiss,” Mr.

Lewis said. The lawsuit against the estate of Kurt Cobain; the musician’s former bandmates, David Grohl and Krist Novoselic; and Mr. Cobain’s widow, Courtney Love, among other parties. Their lawyers did not immediately respond to messages for comment on Tuesday. In their motion to dismiss, the lawyers for Nirvana said that Mr.

Elden’s lawsuit failed to meet the statute of limitations to file a complaint citing a violation of federal criminal child pornography statutes. But they also denied that the picture, “one of the most famous photographs of all time,” was an example of child pornography.

  1. Elden’s claim that the photograph on the ‘Nevermind’ album cover is ‘child pornography’ is, on its face, not serious,” they wrote.
  2. A brief examination of the photograph, or Elden’s own conduct (not to mention the photograph’s presence in the homes of millions of Americans who, on Elden’s theory, are guilty of felony possession of child pornography), makes that clear.” Instead, they said, “the photograph evokes themes of greed, innocence and the motif of the cherub in Western art.” Mr.

Elden was 4 months old when he was photographed in 1991 by a family friend, Kirk Weddle, at the Rose Bowl Aquatics Center in Pasadena, Calif. The photo of Mr. Elden for the album cover, which Mr. Cobain, the band’s frontman, envisioned showing a baby underwater.

  • Mr. Weddle paid Mr.
  • Elden’s parents $200 for the picture, which was later altered to show the baby chasing a dollar, dangling from a fishhook.
  • In the decades that followed, Mr.
  • Elden appeared to celebrate his part in the classic cover, recreating the moment for the album’s,, and anniversaries, though not naked.

But in the lawsuit, Mr. Elden said he had suffered “permanent harm” because of his association with the album, including emotional distress and a “lifelong loss of income-earning capacity.” The lawsuit did not provide details about the losses but said that Nirvana, the producers of the album and others had all profited from the album’s sales at the expense of Mr.

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Elden’s privacy. The lawyers for Nirvana said that Mr. Elden used his fame from the photo to pick up women and benefited financially from the album cover. They described the various times he re-enacted the photograph for a fee, his public appearances parodying the cover, and the copies of the album that he autographed, which were then sold on eBay.

They wrote: “Elden has spent three decades profiting from his celebrity as the self-anointed ‘Nirvana Baby.'” : Lawsuit Accusing Nirvana of Sexually Exploitive Imagery Is Dismissed (Published 2022)

Did the guy who sued Nirvana win?

U.S. District Court judge says Spencer Elden waited too long to file “child pornography” suit, effectively ending his suit over iconic cover image Nirvana has won the lawsuit the band faced over their Nevermind cover art after a judge dismissed the case — filed by Spencer Elden, the baby seen in the iconic photograph — for the final time, effectively ending the “child pornography” suit.

  1. In an eight-page ruling, U.S.
  2. District Judge Fernando Olguin wrote that the lawsuit would grant the defendants’ motion for dismissal again on the grounds that Elden waited too long to file the lawsuit, based on a 10-year statute of limitations.
  3. In short, because it is undisputed that did not file his complaint within ten years after he discovered a violation the court concludes that his claim is untimely,” Olguin wrote.

The judge continued, “Because plaintiff had an opportunity to address the deficiencies in his complaint regarding the statute of limitations, the court is persuaded that it would be futile to afford plaintiff a fourth opportunity to file an amended complaint.” “We are pleased that this meritless case has been brought to a speedy final conclusion,” Bert Deixler, a lawyer for Nirvana, told Reuters,

“Spencer intends to appeal this ruling. This ruling’s interpretation of the statute of limitations on Masha’s Law contravenes over fifteen years of well-settled precedent and the legislature’s intended purpose of the law,” Elden’s lawyer Margaret Mabie told Rolling Stone Saturday. “Under this reading of the law, child pornography remedies vaporize once the victim in the contraband image turns 28 years old.

Under this logic, any child pornography producer—such as Masha Allen’s original abuser—could simply wait out the clock and then re-distribute abusive material with impunity.” Mabie continued, “The Nevermind cover was created at time when Spencer was a baby and it is impossible for him to age out of this victimization while his image remains in distribution.” In a Dec.2021 motion to dismiss the “meritless” lawsuit, first filed in Aug.2021, Nirvana’s lawyers argued that Elden’s willingness to associate himself with the Nevermind cover over the years — such as selling autographed copies of the cover and at one point recreating the photograph as an adult for a paying gig — proved he didn’t suffer any damages.

Why is Kurt Cobain a hero?

Cobain performing on MTV’s Unplugged loudwire.com During the 1990’s, pop culture was redefined by the Seattle sound with the leader at its forefront being none other than the lead singer of Nirvana, Kurt Cobain. Cobain is not only The King of Grunge, he also displayed many heroic characteristics.

Urt Donald Cobain was born on February 20, 1967, as the child of Donald and Wendy Cobain. Cobain married lead singer of the band Hole, Courtney Love, on February 24, 1992. Cobain and his wife also had a daughter named Frances Bean Cobain. Cobain was born in Hoquiam, Washington, and moved to Aberdeen, Washington with his family at just a few months of age.

In high school, Cobain met his future band mate, Krist Novoselic. To engage in future opportunities in the music industry Cobain and Novoselic moved to Seattle, Washington. Ultimately, Cobain and his fellow band mates dubbed themselves Nirvana. Nirvana ended up producing one of the highest selling albums of all time: Nevermind.

Tragically, Cobain ended up dying via self-inflicted gunshot wound on April 8, 1994, in his Seattle home. Be that as it may, Cobain was not an ordinary rock star; he is an essential hero. A hero must possess the ability to lead by example, and demonstrate self-acceptance. Self-acceptance is demonstrated by possessing consciousness and happiness of oneself.

Leading by example is defined as the hero producing the change they would like to see, instead of waiting for someone else to attempt to make a change. Kurt Cobain is much more than the lead singer of the legendary grunge band Nirvana; Cobain is an iconic hero because he demonstrates originality through his self-acceptance and leads his beliefs by example. Cobain’s alternative style put on display thefashionisto.com Cobain demonstrated self-acceptance, which develops his heroism. Explicitly, Cobain’s fashion displayed his self-acceptance: “His look changed fashion. Cobain’s ripped jeans and plaid shirts would make their way to runways, selling for hundreds of dollars.

But Cobain was poor until the last few years of his life and bought his clothes at thrift shops and garage sales” (USA Today). Cobain dressed alternatively in the 90s. However, due to his low social class standing he had to shop at thrift stores. Because of his self-confidence, he inspired others to shop at thrift stores and wear clothes that looked like his.

People of all social classes wanted to replicate Cobain’s alternative style. This illustrates Cobain’s self-acceptance, as he wasn’t bothered with what others thought of how he dressed. Cobain’s alternative music style also exemplified his self acceptance: “By 1994 many of the original grunge bands had cut their hair and begun to release more mainstream albums.

  • Effectively, grunge ended with the suicide of Cobain in the spring of 1994″ (Freind).
  • Cobain had such an immense impact on grunge music that his passing ultimately contributed to the death of grunge.
  • However, his legacy lives on, and his self-acceptance is remembered.
  • His self-acceptance is what defines grunge and ultimately altered teen pop culture forever.

Cobain’s overall indication of his self-acceptance influenced others to replicate his unorthodox style and musical taste. Cobain performing with his wife, Courtney Love, at the Rock Against Rape Benefit razmatazmag.com Cobain leads his ideas and beliefs by example by acting as the change he envisions. Cobain exhibits his beliefs through his lyrics to display the advances he desires: “Hate me, Do it and do it again, Waste me, Rape me, my friend, I’m not the only one” (Nirvana “Rape Me”).

Here, Cobain’s lyrics are protesting against rape and standing up for victims of sexual assault. Cobain was firmly against sexual assault of any kind, and demonstrated that with this song. Cobain is leading by example by displaying to others just how horrific sexual assault is. Instead of using his music to sing about nonsense, Cobain utilized it to display his beliefs and the adjustments he desired to see in the world.

By stating “I’m not the only one” Cobain is conveying to victims of sexual assault that they are not alone. This action of leading by example establishes one of Cobain’s most heroic characteristics. Cobain also protested rape in other ways: “During 1993 Nirvana performed a benefit in San Francisco for rape victims of the ongoing war in Bosnia” (Baker’s Dictionary of Musicians).

  1. Cobain performed at this benefit for rape victims, which represents his anti rape beliefs.
  2. He wanted to raise awareness and funds for victims of rape.
  3. He displayed the change he wanted to bring about.
  4. He is leading by example to make the change he envisions in the world.
  5. Cobain performed to solicit money for a cause he believed in, which persuaded his fans to protest against rape as well.

Cobain exerted his musical influences, which outlines the global change he wanted to establish. Even a young Cobain would stand up for what he believed in: “He reveals how school classmates thought he was gay after he befriended a fellow student who was homosexual.

I started being proud of being gay, even though I wasn’t. I almost found my identity'” (New Zealand Herald). Leading by example is undoubtedly being the change you want to make. Cobain recognized people who identify as gay can be socially excluded, so in high school he chose to associate with a gay kid regardless of what others thought or said about him.

Cobain is accepting of himself, which shows others to take pride in who they are and what they do. This is representative of the change he wants to effect, making him a hero. In order for someone to be classified as a hero, one must demonstrate self-acceptance and lead their ideas and beliefs by example.

Cobain asserts his opinion and ventures to make a change for what he believes, as seen by his acceptance for others, lyrics, and benefit concert. Additionally, Cobain ignored the status quo by dressing differently and playing alternative music, which exudes his self-acceptance and designates him a hero.

Although Cobain’s life melancholically ended at the ripe age of twenty-seven, his astounding legacy will live on forever because of his social activism and contributions to pop culture. Cobain’s actions and style evolved pop culture into ultimately what it is today.

The social justice issues Cobain protested in the 90s are still prevalent in today’s society. Works Cited “A requiem for Kurt Cobain.” USA Today, 18 Mar.2014, p.05D. Biography In Context, Bill Freind. “Grunge.” St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, Gale, 2013. Biography In Context, https://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/UWLKIV414868262/BIC?u=powa9245&si d=BIC&xid=da6b6d03.

Accessed 28 Mar.2018. “Kurt Cobain tells the inside story.” New Zealand Herald, 22 Mar.2008, p.6. Biography In Context https://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A177874596/BIC?u=powa9245&sid=BIC&xid=56 8 02cc8. Accessed 29 Mar.2018. Nirvana. All Apologies: Rape Me, Seattle, WA.

Who is #1 greatest singer of all time?

Rolling Stone 200 greatest singers 2023 Basic Account Get to know the platform Starter Account The ideal entry-level account for individual users $189 USD $149 USD / Month * in the first 12 months Professional Account Full access * Prices do not include sales tax. Learn more about how Statista can support your business. “,”pointFormat”:” • “,”footerFormat”:” “},”plotOptions”:,”shadow”:false,”stacking”:null,”dataLabels”:,”enabled”:true,”zIndex”:3,”rotation”:0}},”pie”:,”format”:” • “}},”line”: “,”useHTML”:false,”crop”:false}},”bar”: “,”useHTML”:false}},”column”: “,”useHTML”:false}},”area”: },”annotations”:,”labelunit”:””},”colors”:,”series”:}],”navigation”: },”exporting”: }> Rolling Stone. (January 1, 2023). The 200 greatest singers of all time according to Rolling Stone as of January 2023, In Statista, Retrieved September 27, 2023, from https://www.statista.com/statistics/1356944/greatest-singers-of-all-time-rolling-stone/ Rolling Stone. “The 200 greatest singers of all time according to Rolling Stone as of January 2023.” Chart. January 1, 2023. Statista. Accessed September 27, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/1356944/greatest-singers-of-all-time-rolling-stone/ Rolling Stone. (2023). The 200 greatest singers of all time according to Rolling Stone as of January 2023, Statista, Statista Inc. Accessed: September 27, 2023. https://www.statista.com/statistics/1356944/greatest-singers-of-all-time-rolling-stone/ Rolling Stone. “The 200 Greatest Singers of All Time According to Rolling Stone as of January 2023.” Statista, Statista Inc., 1 Jan 2023, https://www.statista.com/statistics/1356944/greatest-singers-of-all-time-rolling-stone/ Rolling Stone, The 200 greatest singers of all time according to Rolling Stone as of January 2023 Statista, https://www.statista.com/statistics/1356944/greatest-singers-of-all-time-rolling-stone/ (last visited September 27, 2023) The 200 greatest singers of all time according to Rolling Stone as of January 2023, Rolling Stone, January 1, 2023., Available: https://www.statista.com/statistics/1356944/greatest-singers-of-all-time-rolling-stone/ : Rolling Stone 200 greatest singers 2023

Which artist has sold 1 billion records?

Record Sales – It is estimated that more than one billion Elvis Presley records have been sold worldwide. From his early sessions at Sun Records to the end of his career and beyond, Elvis albums and singles enjoyed strong sales across every format–vinyl, cassette, CD and digital.

Who is #1 artist in the world?

The Weeknd is officially the world’s most popular artist Share Abel Tesfaye, more commonly known as The Weeknd, is statistically the most popular musician on the planet, and no one else even comes close. The 33-year-old Canadian singer’s success has seen him set two new Guinness World Records titles:

Most monthly listeners on Spotify – 111.4 million (as of 20 March 2023) First artist to reach 100 million monthly listeners on Spotify

The Weeknd currently has almost 30 million more monthly listeners than second-placed Miley Cyrus (82.4 million). He is also comfortably ahead of (81.6 million), Ariana Grande (80.6 million), Taylor Swift (80.2 million), Rihanna (78.5 million), and his closest male challenger, Ed Sheeran (77.5 million).

YT The Weeknd’s surging streaming figures come on the back of the release of his “Die For You” remix featuring Ariana Grande, which went viral on TikTok. The track peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming the seventh number-one hit for both The Weeknd and Grande respectively. Prior to its release, Grande teased the song by posting a TikTok video of herself in the studio, accompanied by the caption, “wrote and recorded a verse for my friend after a 14-hour day on set.

This certain exception had to be made.” ⭐️🌙 It is the duo’s fourth collaboration, following “Love Me Harder” (2014), “Off the Table” (2020) and the remix of “Save Your Tears” (2021). The original “Die For You” was released in 2016 as part of The Weeknd’s Starboy album, and has finally topped the charts six years later. These aren’t The Weeknd’s first Guinness World Records titles. In 2016 ; one for the most streamed album on Spotify in 2015, and another for the most consecutive weeks in the Top 10 of Billboard’s Hot 100 by a solo male artist, The album was Beauty Behind the Madness, which, led by the single “Can’t Feel My Face”, propelled The Weeknd to global superstardom. The Weeknd has released five studio albums since debuting with Kiss Land (2013). His latest release, Dawn FM (2022), is his most critically acclaimed project to date. “Blinding Lights” from The Weeknd’s fourth album, After Hours, remains the most streamed track on Spotify, with over 3.4 billion streams as of February 2023.

The song ousted Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You” which had held the top spot since September 2017. Want more? Follow us across our social media channels to stay up-to-date with all things Guinness World Records! You can find us on,,,,, and – including our in-depth series. Don’t forget, we’re also on ! Still not had enough? Follow the to buy our latest book, filled to the brim with stories about our amazing record breakers.

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What is the best selling song of all time?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 1942 10-inch 78 rpm release of the single ” White Christmas ” by Bing Crosby 1997 7-inch 45 rpm release of ” Candle in the Wind 1997 “/” Something About the Way You Look Tonight “, double A-side single by Elton John This is a compendium of the best-selling music singles, The criterion for inclusion is to sell at least ten million copies worldwide.

The singles listed here were cited by reliable sources from various media, such as digital journalism, newspapers, magazines, and books. According to Guinness World Records, Irving Berlin ‘s ” White Christmas ” (1942) as performed by Bing Crosby is the best-selling single worldwide, with estimated sales of over 50 million copies.

The song, recognized as “the best-selling single of all time”, was released before the pop / rock singles-chart era and “was listed as the world’s best-selling single in the first-ever Guinness Book of Records (published in 1955) and—remarkably—still retains the title more than 50 years later”.

Guinness World Records also states that double A-side charity single ” Candle in the Wind 1997 “/” Something About the Way You Look Tonight ” (1997) by Elton John (rewritten as a tribute to Diana, Princess of Wales, rather than Marilyn Monroe in the original 1973 version), is “the biggest-selling single since UK and US singles charts began in the 1950s, having accumulated worldwide sales of 33 million copies”.

This makes it the second-best-selling physical single of all time. Two best-selling singles lists are displayed here relating first to physical singles (mainly CD and vinyl singles) and second to digital singles (digitally downloaded tracks which first became available to purchase in the early 2000s).

What is the most successful album of all time?

1. Thriller – Michael Jackson – Best Selling Albums Of All Time – Finally, the King of Pop has held on to the top spot posthumously since 2009, selling over 66 million copies worldwide! As well as the title, track, the album was packed with best-selling singles from ‘Billie Jean’, to ‘P.Y.T’, to ‘Beat It’. Thriller has become a global phenomenon.

  1. Jackson’s debut of the signature moonwalk was for a performance of Billie Jean from the album.
  2. Released in 1982, Thriller was Jackson’s sixth studio album and the second album produced with Quincy Jones.
  3. By the end of 1983, it had already sold 32 million copies marking it out as the best-selling pop album of all time.

Listen to the full album below.

Who was bigger Elvis or Michael Jackson?

Billboard stats: Most weeks at number 1: 1st place is Elvis with 79; distant 2nd is Beatles with 59. Michael comes in 6th, with 37. Most #1 singles: Beatles are 1st with 20; Elvis is tied for 2nd with 18; Michael is tied for 3rd/4th (depending on how you like to count ties) with 13.

Who originally sang Poetry Man?

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Poetry Man”
Single by Phoebe Snow
from the album Phoebe Snow
B-side “Either or Both”
Released December 1974
Recorded 1973
Studio A & R Recording (NYC)
Genre Blues, jazz blues, folk
Length 4 : 36 (album version) 3:15 (edited single)
Label Shelter Records
Songwriter(s) Phoebe Snow
Producer(s) Dino Airali
Phoebe Snow singles chronology
” Poetry Man ” (1974) “Harpo’s Blues” (1975)

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Poetry Man ” is a song by the American singer-songwriter Phoebe Snow, It was written by Snow, produced by Dino Airali, and first appeared on her 1974 self-titled debut album,

Who did the music for the man who fell to earth?

Stomu Yamash’ta and John Phillips ‘ cult-classic score, available for the first time.

Who was the first artist to sing We Are the World?

References –

  1. ^ O’Connor, Rory (March 24, 2020). “Lionel Richie plans new ‘We Are the World’ charity single to fundraise against coronavirus”, Smooth Radio, Retrieved March 24, 2020,
  2. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Holden, Stephen (February 27, 1985). “The pop life; artists join in effort for famine relief”, The New York Times, Retrieved July 11, 2009,
  3. ^ Jump up to: a b Taylor, Jonathan (March 17, 1985). “A hit with a heart: ‘We Are the World’ buoyed by brisk sales and curiosity”, Chicago Tribune, Retrieved October 7, 2009,
  4. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Taraborrelli, p.341
  5. ^ Harden, Blaine (September 14, 1987). “Ethiopia Faces Famine Again, Requests Massive Food Relief”, The Washington Post, Retrieved October 7, 2009,
  6. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e Taraborrelli, p.342
  7. ^ Jump up to: a b c Campbell, p.109
  8. ^ Jump up to: a b Campbell, p.110
  9. ^ Gunnar “funkpost” Kristiansen (November 16, 2017). “Behind 10 of JR’s biggest hits”, SlapKlatz, Retrieved July 15, 2020,
  10. ^ Breskin, p.2
  11. ^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i j k Breskin, p.3
  12. ^ Breskin, pp.5–6
  13. ^ Jump up to: a b “We Are the World tune brings out the best of America’s 46 stars”, Jet, February 18, 1985.p.16, Retrieved July 11, 2009, jackson we are the world.
  14. ^ Jump up to: a b “Prince”, CNN, December 20, 1999, Retrieved July 11, 2009,
  15. ^ Parks, Kyle (April 5, 1985). “Only a bad album could dethrone Prince”, The Evening Independent, Retrieved July 11, 2009,
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How many versions of The Man Who Sold the World are there?

Versions –

Title Performer Release date Info
The Man Who Sold the World David Bowie November 4, 1970 First release
The Man Who Sold the World Top of the Pops February 1974
The Man Who Sold the World Lulu 1974 Hit song
The Man Who Sold the World The Wally Brothers 1974
The Man Who Sold the World The Hiltonaires 1974
The Man Who Sold the World The Droogs 1974
The Man Who Sold the World Maxwell Plumm 1975
The Man Who Sold the World Nocturns 1979
The Man Who Sold the World Midge Ure 1982
The Man Who Sold the World Električni Orgazam August 24, 1983
The Man Who Sold the World Here and Now 1983
The Man Who Sold the World Richard Barone 1987
The Man Who Sold the World Coco York 1987
The Man Who Sold the World No Man 1990
The Man Who Sold the World Nirvana 1994 Sampled by Apoptygma Berzerk
The Man Who Sold the World Ed Kuepper 1995
The Man Who Sold the World John Cougar 1998
The Man Who Sold the World Boys of a New Age featuring Katrina B 1998
The Man Who Sold the World Kristen de Beauvoir (Dressed to Kill Studio Artists) June 6, 2000
The Man Who Sold the World Fear Cult October 31, 2000
The Man Who Sold the World Cybernauts December 27, 2000 Live
The Man Who Sold the World Simple Minds 2001
The Man Who Sold the World Tacye 2001
The Man Who Sold the World The Klone Orchestra 2002
The Man Who Sold the World Des de Moor and Russell Churney October 6, 2003
The Man Who Sold the World Bug Funny Music Foundation 2003
The Man Who Sold the World Jordis Unga 2005 Live
The Man Who Sold the World Hearts Fail February 28, 2006
The Man Who Sold the World Musicrama 2006
The Man Who Sold the World Cocosuma April 24, 2007
The Man Who Sold the World Allegra June 25, 2007
The Man Who Sold the World Marcus Van Heller 2007
The Man Who Sold the World Leana Sealy June 7, 2009
The Man Who Sold the World Maria Eliza December 2009
The Man Who Sold the World The Hit Co. (Planet Music Studio Artists) 2009
The Man Who Sold the World Amanda Jo Williams September 14, 2010
The Man Who Sold the World The Bowie Knives (Cleopatra Studio Artists) January 7, 2011
The Man Who Sold the World ohashiTrio March 16, 2011
The Man Who Sold the World Lea W. Frey April 1, 2011
The Man Who Sold the World Sinfonico Honolulu May 2, 2011 Live
The Man Who Sold the World Federica Zammarchi 2011
The Man Who Sold the World Tom Harries February 27, 2012 Editor’s cover song pick
The Man Who Sold the World Voice in Fashion September 19, 2012
The Man Who Sold the World Aperegina March 12, 2013
The Man Who Sold the World Gary Brown October 30, 2013
The Man Who Sold the World Sweet Wine 2013
The Man Who Sold the World Eye 2 Eye April 22, 2014
The Man Who Sold the World Claire Martin featuring Joe Stilgoe August 2014
The Man Who Sold the World Sílvia Pérez Cruz – Raül Fernández Miró November 24, 2014
The Man Who Sold the World Jynx & Dino March 9, 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Leaf Rapids April 14, 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Ale Vanzella April 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Tony Visconti and Woody Woodmansey’s Holy Holy with Glenn Gregory and Steve Norman June 22, 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Loser’s Lounge feat. Julia Greenberg September 7, 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Cinzia Bavelloni October 6, 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Rescue Dogs 2015
The Man Who Sold the World Dethstarla January 12, 2016 Unverified
The Man Who Sold the World Zaccy February 16, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Cataline March 1, 2016
Changes / Heroes / The Man Who Sold the World Brentwood Duo April 1, 2016 Medley A cappella Acoustic
The Girl Who Sold the World Black Maggot June 21, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World The Pinxtones June 23, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Blackberry Lily July 15, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Charlie Pollack October 21, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Sonia De Los Santos – Elena Moon Park November 18, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Patrick Finley and his Robot Army December 23, 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Laurence Revey 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Bikini Thrill 2016
The Man Who Sold the World Seth Storm January 10, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World David Fonseca – Ana Moura February 17, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World MXAAXM March 4, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World Ed Morneau & Kiera Flynn-Carson July 24, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World Ramonda Hammer August 16, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World O.A.K. Oscillazioni Alchemico Kreative September 30, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World Andrea Chimenti October 7, 2017
Man Who Sold the World THePETEBOX November 10, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World (Introspective mix) Al-pha-X November 20, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World Smells Like Grunge November 20, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World Chris Brokaw November 28, 2017
The Man Who Sold the World Miriam Aïda September 14, 2018
The Man Who Sold the World J.R. Richards November 10, 2018
The Man Who Sold the World Buddha of Suburbia 2018
Take Me Home The Five Mod Four January 31, 2019 Medley
The Man Who Sold the World Unwoman November 1, 2019
The Man Who Sold the World Yelloworld 2019 Unverified
The Man Who Sold the World Kyle Richards & the TM Collective July 25, 2020
The Man Who Sold the World Emel October 9, 2020 Acoustic
The Man Who Sold the World Dunia and Aram 2020
The Man Who Sold the World The Hics April 15, 2021
The Man Who Sold the World Kaddy Kobain April 15, 2021 Unverified
The Man Who Sold the World Rhoda Dakar January 4, 2022
The Man Who Sold the World Nova February 25, 2022
The Man Who Sold the World Josh Rabenold March 11, 2022

table>

Title Performer Release date Info i The Man Who Sold the World Pachora 1999 i The Man Who Sold the World Vitamin String Quartet August 13, 2002 i The Man Who Sold the World Dark One Lite August 3, 2004 i The Man Who Sold the World Bica – Kalima – Klammer February 6, 2006 i The Man Who Sold the World The Section Quartet 2007 i The Man Who Sold the World/James Bond Theme Richter Uzur Duo November 27, 2009 Medley i The Man Who Sold the World Simone Graziano Trio 2010 i The Man Who Sold the World Twinkle Twinkle Little Rock Star September 27, 2011 i The Man Who Sold the World Yoga Pop Ups October 18, 2011 i The Man Who Sold the World The Lost Boys of Penzance 2011 i The Man Who Sold the World Eklipse March 30, 2012 Unverified i The Man Who Sold the World Sweet Little Band October 23, 2012 i The Man Who Sold the World The Wee Trio 2012 i The Man Who Sold the World Jeremy Deller June 24, 2013 i The Man Who Sold the World Meridian String Quartet December 2, 2013 i The Man Who Sold the World Steven Charles Boone April 29, 2014 i The Man Who Sold the World Dismiss July 15, 2014 i The Man Who Sold the World Jeff Herr Corporation December 1, 2014 i The Man Who Sold the World Maurizio Ziomi – Marco Pigolotti January 18, 2015 i The Man Who Sold the World Francesco Digilio November 14, 2016 i The Man Who Sold the World Aranis February 9, 2017 i The Man Who Sold the World Raised by Uncles November 1, 2017 i The Man Who Sold the World Rijid 2017 i The Man Who Sold the World Saetta – Penta – Bolognini ‎/ Triapology 2017 i The Man Who Sold the World Guitar Tribute Players November 16, 2018 Acoustic i The Man Who Sold the World The Reverbivores 2018 i The Man Who Sold the World 8 Bit Arcade November 7, 2019 i The Man Who Sold the World Bruno Heinen 2019 i The Man Who Sold the World Possible(S) Quartet 2019 Unverified i The Man Who Sold the World The Cat and Owl January 2, 2020 i The Man Who Sold the World The Hics April 15, 2021