How To Quit Vaping? - [] 2024: CLT Livre

How To Quit Vaping?

How To Quit Vaping

Is vaping easy to quit?

Vaping may be as hard to quit as tobacco cigarettes because they both contain highly addictive nicotine. Quitting JUUL or other e-cigarettes requires wanting to quit, making a plan to quit, reaching out for help and even working with an expert to set a quit date.

How long does vape withdrawal last?

What are some of the nicotine withdrawal symptoms associated with quitting tobacco? – Because the nicotine in tobacco is highly addictive, people who quit may experience nicotine withdrawal symptoms, especially if they have smoked or used other tobacco products heavily for many years.

nicotine cravings anger, frustration, and irritability difficulty concentrating insomnia restlessness anxiety depression hunger or increased appetite

Other, less common nicotine withdrawal symptoms include headaches, fatigue, dizziness, coughing, mouth ulcers, and constipation ( 1, 2 ). The good news is that there is much you can do to reduce nicotine cravings and manage common withdrawal symptoms.

Is it OK to just stop vaping?

Although vaping is established as a way to stop smoking, there are potential health risks. According to the NHS, e-cigarettes are substantially less harmful than traditional cigarettes but are not risk-free and their long-term health impact is unknown.

“The healthiest option is not to smoke or vape. If you do not smoke, do not start vaping,” the NHS website says, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health goes further. It wants the government to ban the sale of disposable vapes, popular with young people, due to concerns over their impact on children’s hearts, lungs and brains.

So, what is the best way to quit vaping? Unlike cigarettes, where official advice is to completely stop smoking, going cold turkey is not recommended when giving up vaping. Louise Ross, a clinical consultant at the National Centre for Smoking Cessation and Training, says the most important thing is to be ready to give up.

If you stop too quickly, the risk is that you go back to smoking.” She advises reducing the strength of the vapes gradually, vaping less often and in fewer places, and making sure your vape isn’t always in your hand. “It’s about setting controls,” she says. The NHS urges people to take this slowly. “Do not rush this step,” it says.

“Only reduce your vaping frequency or nicotine strength when you feel you will not go back to smoking and do not have to puff more to compensate.” Jamie Brown, a professor of behavioural science and health, and a director of the tobacco and alcohol research group at University College London, agrees.

If it helps people not to smoke, there is no need to rush to stop vaping. If people are confident they will not relapse to smoking, then after quitting vaping they may find Nicorette QuickMist mouthspray helpful to relieve cravings and nicotine withdrawal,” he says. “The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has recently granted approval for this purpose.” Other ways to reduce cravings are taking deep breaths, practising mindfulness and going for a brisk walk.

And for teenagers who have never smoked, Ross advises them to consider the environmental benefits of stopping vaping, as well as the health benefits. Vape batteries contain lithium, aluminium, steel, copper and plastics. According to the Independent Vape Trade Association, over 1m single-use vapes a week are binned and sent to landfill or incineration.

Can your lungs heal from vaping?

Can your lungs heal from vaping? – Some damage to your lungs from vaping can heal or get better with medications. Others, like lung scarring, are permanent. Over time, constant irritation to your lungs can lead to health problems (like asthma and COPD ) that won’t go away.

Will I recover if I stop vaping?

7. Enhanced Lung Capacity – Within the first 1 to 9 months after quitting vaping, the lung’s capacity to clear out mucus and fight off infections significantly increases. This event is even more noticeable than the early signs of increased lung capacity most people will feel shortly after they quit vaping.

Am I addicted to vaping?

Addiction can start if an individual finds that they can’t stop vaping, that they have withdrawal symptoms when they try to quit, and that they keep smoking despite having health problems. Another sign that addiction is developing is if you give up social activities because you can’t vape in those situations.

What is the hardest time to quit vaping?

Know What Challenges to Expect – The first few weeks of quitting vaping are usually the hardest. Take it one day at a time. You may face some challenges along the way, but knowing what to expect and being prepared can help. Learn your triggers. Certain people, places, feelings, or situations can cause you to want to vape.

It’s important to know your triggers. It may be best to avoid situations that can trigger you to vape when you’re in the early stages of your quit. Prepare for cravings and withdrawal. Think about how you will fight cravings and deal with withdrawal symptoms, Knowing what to expect and having strategies for handling thoughts about vaping or uncomfortable feelings will help you succeed and stay with your quit in those tough moments.

Resist temptations. Avoid places and situations where others are vaping. If you can’t avoid being around vaping, plan for how you will handle these situations. Maybe that means you take a temporary break from friends you vape with and think about what you will say if somebody offers you a vape.

Is it better to quit vaping cold turkey or gradually?

Quit Vaping Cold-Turkey – If you’re very motivated to quit nicotine, and quit quickly, quitting cold-turkey might be the best option for you. Quitting ‘cold-turkey’ means cutting all nicotine to zero on the day you decide to quit. This method is arguably the hardest, but it is also the most common successful quit method when it comes to quitting nicotine – more smokers that have successfully quit have quit nicotine have quit via cold-turkey than any other method.

The first few days are the hardest, and you’re likely to be very irritable. It helps to have a good support network, let your friends and family know what you’re doing, so they can provide support and understanding when you will most likely not be in the best mood. Quitting cold-turkey is always worth a shot first.

It’s also the cheapest method of quitting!

Is it safe to vape without nicotine?

The safety and long-term health effects of using e-cigarettes or other vaping products still aren’t well known. In September 2019, federal and state health authorities began investigating an outbreak of a severe lung disease associated with e-cigarettes and other vaping products,

  • We’re closely monitoring the situation and will update our content as soon as more information is available,
  • Vaping without nicotine may not be as safe as some people believe.
  • Vaping overall, even without nicotine, can have harmful effects.
  • Vaping, the act of vaporizing a liquid to inhale, is an increasingly popular alternative to cigarette smoking.

However, it could damage health by irritating the lungs and throat and introducing toxins into the body. Some vape product manufacturers claim that vaping is a completely safe alternative to smoking. However, early research into the safety of the practice suggests this is not the case.

This article discusses the current research on the side effects of vaping without nicotine. E-liquid refers to the liquid that vape devices or electronic cigarettes vaporize. People may also call it e-juice or vape juice. The side effects that a person experiences when vaping depend partly on the type of e-liquid they use.

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The specific components of e-liquids vary among brands and products. The base liquid is generally a blend of ingredients such as water, vegetable glycerine, and propylene glycol. Manufacturers then add different flavorings or additives to this mixture to create a particular flavor.

  • Many of these ingredients have a Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) certification — a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designation — for use in food products.
  • However, the vaping process heats and vaporizes these ingredients, and there is little research that suggests food-grade ingredients are safe for vaping.

Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that vape aerosol can contain dangerous substances aside from nicotine, including:

diacetyl, which has links to lung diseaseheavy metals such as nickel, tin, and leadother volatile organic compounds

Vaping without nicotine prevents nicotine dependence and other side effects that have an association with nicotine. However, vaping without nicotine can also cause side effects, including those below.

Are Vapes worse than cigarettes?

About Electronic Cigarettes (E-cigarettes)

  • E-cigarettes have the potential to benefit adults who smoke and who are not pregnant if used as a complete substitute for regular cigarettes and other smoked tobacco products.
  • E-cigarettes are not safe for youth, young adults, pregnant adults, as well as adults who do not currently use tobacco products.
  • While e-cigarettes have the potential to benefit some people and harm others, scientists still have a lot to learn about whether e-cigarettes are effective in helping adults quit smoking.
  • If you’ve never smoked or used other tobacco products or e-cigarettes, don’t start.
  • Additional research can help understand long-term health effects.

E-cigarettes are not safe for youth, young adults, and pregnant women, as well as adults who do not currently use tobacco products.

  • E-cigarettes come in many shapes and sizes. Most have a battery, a heating element, and a place to hold a liquid.
  • E-cigarettes produce an aerosol by heating a liquid that usually contains nicotine—the addictive drug in regular cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products—flavorings, and other chemicals that help to make the aerosol. Users inhale this aerosol into their lungs. Bystanders can also breathe in this aerosol when the user exhales into the air.
  • E-cigarettes are known by many different names. They are sometimes called “e-cigs,” “e-hookahs,” “mods,” “vape pens,” “vapes,” “tank systems,” and “electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS).”
  • Some e-cigarettes are made to look like regular cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Some resemble pens, USB sticks, and other everyday items. Larger devices such as tank systems, or “mods,” do not resemble other tobacco products.
  • Using an e-cigarette is sometimes called “vaping.”
  • E-cigarettes can be used to deliver marijuana and other drugs.

Some e-cigarettes are made to look like regular cigarettes, cigars, or pipes. Some resemble pens, USB sticks, and other everyday items. The e-cigarette aerosol that users breathe from the device and exhale can contain harmful and potentially harmful substances, including:

  • Nicotine
  • Ultrafine particles that can be inhaled deep into the lungs
  • Flavoring such as diacetyl, a chemical linked to a serious lung disease
  • Volatile organic compounds
  • Cancer-causing chemicals
  • Heavy metals such as nickel, tin, and lead

It is difficult for consumers to know what e-cigarette products contain. For example, some e-cigarettes marketed as containing zero percent nicotine have been found to contain nicotine. What is in e-cigarette aerosol? E-cigarettes are still fairly new, and scientists are still learning about their long-term health effects. Here is what we know now. Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which has known health effects.

  • Nicotine is highly addictive.
  • Nicotine is toxic to developing fetuses.
  • Nicotine can harm adolescent and young adult brain development, which continues into the early to mid-20s.
  • Nicotine is a health danger for pregnant adults and their developing babies.

Besides nicotine, e-cigarette aerosol can contain substances that harm the body.

This includes cancer-causing chemicals and tiny particles that reach deep into lungs. However, e-cigarette aerosol generally contains fewer harmful chemicals than smoke from burned tobacco products.

E-cigarettes can cause unintended injuries.

  • Defective e-cigarette batteries have caused fires and explosions, some of which have resulted in serious injuries. Most explosions happened when the e-cigarette batteries were being charged.
    • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collects data to help address this issue. You can report an e-cigarette explosion, or any other unexpected health or safety issue with an e-cigarette,,
  • In addition, acute nicotine exposure can be toxic. Children and adults have been poisoned by swallowing, breathing, or absorbing e-cigarette liquid through their skin or eyes.

E-cigarettes are still fairly new, and scientists are still learning about their long-term health effects. Here is what we know now. Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which has known health effects.

  • Nicotine is highly addictive.
  • Nicotine is toxic to developing fetuses.
  • Nicotine can harm adolescent and young adult brain development, which continues into the early to mid-20s.
  • Nicotine is a health danger for pregnant adults and their developing babies.

Besides nicotine, e-cigarette aerosol can contain substances that harm the body.

This includes cancer-causing chemicals and tiny particles that reach deep into lungs. However, e-cigarette aerosol generally contains fewer harmful chemicals than smoke from burned tobacco products.

E-cigarettes can cause unintended injuries.

  • Defective e-cigarette batteries have caused fires and explosions, some of which have resulted in serious injuries. Most explosions happened when the e-cigarette batteries were being charged.
    • The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) collects data to help address this issue. You can report an e-cigarette explosion, or any other unexpected health or safety issue with an e-cigarette,,
  • In addition, acute nicotine exposure can be toxic. Children and adults have been poisoned by swallowing, breathing, or absorbing e-cigarette liquid through their skin or eyes.

Most e-cigarettes contain nicotine, which is addictive and toxic to developing fetuses. Nicotine exposure can also harm adolescent and young adult brain development, which continues into the early to mid-20s. E-cigarette aerosol can contain chemicals that are harmful to the lungs. Yes—but that doesn’t mean e-cigarettes are safe. E-cigarette aerosol generally contains fewer toxic chemicals than the, However, e-cigarette aerosol is not harmless. It can contain harmful and potentially harmful substances, including nicotine, heavy metals like lead, volatile organic compounds, and cancer-causing agents. E-cigarettes are not currently approved by the FDA as a quit smoking aid. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a group of health experts that makes recommendations about preventive health care, has that evidence is insufficient to recommend e-cigarettes for smoking cessation in adults, including pregnant adults.3 However, e-cigarettes may help non-pregnant adults who smoke if used as a complete substitute for all cigarettes and other smoked tobacco products.

  • To date, the few studies on the issue are mixed. A found evidence from two randomized controlled trials that e-cigarettes with nicotine can help adults who smoke stop smoking in the long term compared with placebo (non-nicotine) e-cigarettes.4 However, there are some limitations to the existing research, including the small number of trials, small sample sizes, and wide margins of error around the estimates.
  • A recent found that many adults are using e-cigarettes in an attempt to quit smoking.5 However, most adult e-cigarette users do not stop smoking cigarettes and are instead continuing to use both products (known as “dual use”).7 is not an effective way to safeguard your health, whether you’re using e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, or other tobacco products in addition to regular cigarettes. Because smoking even a few cigarettes a day can be dangerous, 6 quitting smoking completely is very important to protect your health.

E-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among youth.

  • In 2022, 2.55 million U.S. middle and high school students used e-cigarettes in the past 30 days, including 3.3% of middle school students and 14.1% of high school students.9
  • In 2021, 4.5% of U.S. adults currently used e-cigarettes.10
  • In 2019, among adults who currently used e-cigarettes overall, 36.9% also currently smoked cigarettes, 39.5% formerly smoked cigarettes, and 23.6% had never smoked cigarettes.11
  • Among adults who currently used e-cigarettes, the percentage who have never smoked cigarettes is highest among those aged 18–24 years (56.0%), and is lower in older age groups.11
  1. US Department of Health and Human Services., Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2016.
  2. Goniewicz ML, Gupta R, Lee YH, et al. Nicotine levels in electronic cigarette refill solutions: a comparative analysis of products from the U.S., Korea, and Poland. Int J Drug Policy.2015;26(6):583–588.
  3. Patnode CP, Henderson JT, Thompson JH, Senger CA, Fortmann SP, Whitlock EP. Behavioral Counseling and Pharmacotherapy Interventions for Tobacco Cessation in Adults, Including Pregnant Women: A Review of Reviews for the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Evidence Synthesis No.134. AHRQ Publication No.14-05200-EF-1. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2015.
  4. Hartmann-Boyce J, McRobbie H, Bullen C, Begh R, Stead LF, Hajek P. Published 13 September 2016.
  5. Caraballo RS, Shafer PR, Patel D, Davis KC, McAfee TA., Prev Chronic Dis 2017; 14:160600.
  6. Bjartveit K, Tverdal A. Health Consequences of Smoking 1-4 Cigarettes Per Day. Tobacco Control 2005;14(5):315–20.
  7. . MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:1177.
  8. Park-Lee E, Ren C, Sawdey M, et al., Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2021; 70:1387–9.
  9. Park Lee E, Ren C, Cooper M, Cornelius M, Jamal A, Cullen KA., Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2022; 71:45.
  10. Cornelius ME, Loretan CG, Jamal A, et al., MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2023;72:475–483.
  11. Cornelius ME, Wang TW, Jamal A, Loretan C, Neff L. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2020. Volume 69(issue 46); pages 1736–1742.,
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  • : About Electronic Cigarettes (E-cigarettes)

    How many puffs of a vape is equal to a cigarette?

    How Many Cigarettes Are in a Vape? Calculating by Puff Count – Another way to compare how much nicotine is in a vape vs. a cigarette – at least in the case of disposable vapes – is by looking at the puff counts of the various devices. On the package of every disposable vape, you’ll see a number signifying the approximate number of puffs the device will deliver before it runs out of vape juice.

    For example, the Innokin Innobar F600 lasts up to 600 puffs, whereas the Innokin Innobar V3 lasts up to 6,000 puffs. The e-liquid content and nicotine strengths of the disposable vapes available to you may vary depending on the region in which you live. So, how many cigarettes are in a vape if you calculate by puff count? A smoker typically puffs on a cigarette around 10-15 times before putting it out, so let’s be conservative and estimate that puffing on a vape 15 times is approximately equal to smoking one cigarette.

    If that’s the case, then a disposable vape that delivers 600 puffs is equal to about two packs of cigarettes. A disposable vape with 6,000 puffs, on the other hand, is the equivalent of up to two cartons of cigarettes. Of course, it’s unlikely that you’ll get exactly the number of puffs out of a disposable vape as what’s stated on the box, because the number of times that you can puff on a disposable vape before it runs out of e-liquid will vary depending on how you vape.

    Is it too late to quit vape?

    Know the Risks of Smoking and Vaping: – Smoking and vaping, even in small amounts or only sometimes, can be harmful to your health while also increasing your chances of becoming addicted.

    Increased heart rate Increased blood pressure Slower recovery from injuries Fertility issues in both females and males Loss of vision, including cataracts Increased risk for respiratory tract infections Safety risk potential for e-cigarette lithium-ion batteries to explode

    Increased risk of cancer Increased risk of heart disease Increased risk of lung disease Increased risk of premature death Increased risk of heart attack

    Even if you’re only smoking or vaping sometimes, the effects can be just as risky to your health as a daily smoking habit. Quitting can reverse the damage that smoking has had on your health and lower your chance of dying from smoking-related disease. It’s never too late to quit.

    Is there a healthy vape?

    Understanding “Healthy Vapes” – A new fad has emerged in the vaping world and taken over social media: “healthy vapes.” Sometimes referred to as “nutritional supplement diffusers” or “vitamin vapes,” these new devices promise big health benefits to those looking to quit using traditional Nicotine vaping devices or add some type of “boost” to their lifestyles.

    1. These “healthy vapes” allow users to inhale ingredients like vitamin B12, caffeine, melatonin, and various essential oils rather than Nicotine and other harmful substances.
    2. However, regulators and other experts warn that these products simply do not live up to their claims of being “healthy” alternatives to vaping.

    As a result, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned consumers in 2021 against using vaping products with “unproven health claims.” Currently, no vaping products are approved by the FDA to prevent, treat, or improve any health condition or overall well-being.

    Does popcorn lung go away?

    The safety and long-term health effects of using e-cigarettes or other vaping products still aren’t well known. In September 2019, federal and state health authorities began investigating an outbreak of a severe lung disease associated with e-cigarettes and other vaping products,

    1. We’re closely monitoring the situation and will update our content as soon as more information is available,
    2. Popcorn lung is a rare condition that causes airway scarring due to inflammation and eventually lung damage.
    3. Although there is no cure for popcorn lung, treatments can help with managing symptoms.

    While treatments exist to limit and manage symptoms, popcorn lung is considered life-threatening. Image credit: Xie, B-Q, et al., PLOS, 2014 March “> Popcorn lung is characterized by the lung tissue scarring and becoming narrow. This can lead to breathing problems. Image credit: Xie, B-Q, et al., PLOS, 2014 March Popcorn lung is a rare medical condition that damages the bronchioles, the lung’s smallest airways. Over time, Share on Pinterest The chemicals found in e-cigarette liquid, known as “e-juice,” may be a potential cause of popcorn lung.

    What are the benefits of vaping?

    Benefits of vaping – • Vaping can help some people quit smoking. • Vaping is usually cheaper than smoking. • Vaping is not harmless, but it is much less harmful than smoking. • Vaping is less harmful to those around you than smoking, as there’s no current evidence that second-hand vapour is dangerous to others.

    Can vaping help stress?

    Nicotine use and stress Using nicotine can be complicated. In the short-term, vaping nicotine may feel good by stimulating production of the “feel good” chemical in the brain called dopamine which can create feelings of pleasure and relaxation. Vaping nicotine also creates social opportunities to connect with other people and provides a distraction from stressful situations.

    • These are powerful drivers for continuing to vape.
    • However, because of the way nicotine works in the body, those feel-good chemicals don’t last long.
    • Within just a few hours, the effect of nicotine in the body wears off and can lead to a desire to vape again.
    • This is nicotine withdrawal, and it includes cravings or urges to vape, feeling irritated or upset, feeling jumpy and restless and having a hard time concentrating, changes in sleep and eating habits, and feeling anxious or depressed.

    Over time, it can take more and more nicotine used more and more frequently to create that same good feeling and deal with these symptoms of withdrawal. That’s called nicotine dependence. Eventually, what started out as a pleasurable experience of vaping nicotine turns into vaping to get rid of withdrawal symptoms.

    This cycle can make it feel like vaping nicotine relieves anxiety and depression. But the reality is that it only addresses withdrawal symptoms and makes the cycle continue. Because of this complex cycle, many tobacco users falsely believe tobacco products can relieve stress or anxiety. The idea that tobacco products curb the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal is often misinterpreted as a beneficial effect on mental health, according to research on the effects of quitting smoking on mental health.

    Nicotine — which is found in e-cigarettes, cigarettes, and other tobacco products — harms developing brains, and can make young people more susceptible to addiction, and has implications for mental health. These connections were highlighted in the Truth Initiative ® report “.” We explore one of those connections — nicotine and stress — in more detail here and dispel some of the myths about nicotine as a stress-reliever. Vaping nicotine can increase anxiety symptoms and stress levels. However, many tobacco users falsely believe tobacco products can relieve stress or anxiety. When a smoker puffs on a cigarette, nicotine is carried into the lungs via smoke particles where it is absorbed into blood and makes its way quickly to the brain. Nicotine’s release of pleasure-inducing chemicals makes tobacco users feel good in the short-term and can appear to have a positive effect on stress. However, it’s important to note that nicotine use does not alleviate stress in the long-term and instead can trap users in a cycle of nicotine addiction.

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    Smokers experience irritability, anxiety, and depression when they have not smoked for a while, feelings which are relieved by smoking. The cycle of symptoms followed by relief from smoking can create the perception that smoking has psychological benefits. The tobacco industry has promoted the illusion of nicotine as a stress-relieving tool for decades.

    It has invested significant resources in marketing that connects tobacco use with mental well-being, stress relief, relaxation, and pleasure. One prominent theme used in tobacco advertising is that “smoking can help solve some personal and emotional problems by relieving stress and promoting relaxation.” Many e-cigarette brands are now tapping into themes of stress relief and mental wellbeing as well.

    For example, the popular disposable e-cigarette brand Puff Bar marketed its product during the pandemic as a way to “stay sane,” advertising it as “the perfect escape from back-to-back zoom calls, parental texts, and WFH stress.” In addition to supporting research that positions cigarettes as a way to self-medicate and using stress relief themes in marketing,,

    Nicotine use – whether through smoking or vaping — can increase stress levels. Despite the tobacco industry’s promotion of its products as stress-relieving, studies among cigarette smokers have found that young people who smoke have higher levels of perceived stress.

    Adolescent cigarette smokers were significantly more likely to report greater stress levels than those who quit smoking, according to an article published in JAMA Pediatrics.

    Despite studies illustrating nicotine’s role in exacerbating stress levels and showing that tobacco users tend to have higher levels of stress, young people continue to mistakenly turn to tobacco as a source to relieve stress. Research by Truth Initiative shows that, during the pandemic, a large majority of young e-cigarette users started using them to lessen feelings of stress, anxiety, or depression, and many continue vaping to cope with these feelings.

    81% who had used e-cigarettes said they started vaping to decrease stress, anxiety, or depression, according to an August 2021 survey of 1,000 people between ages 15 and 24. More than half of vapers use e-cigarettes to cope: 50.3% of frequent vapers — those who vaped 20 or more days in the past month — reported that they need to vape to cope with stress or anxiety, according to Truth Initiative continuous tracking data from June 2021. In a separate study, when respondents were asked about the advantages of e-cigarette use, one of the most frequently listed advantages was “relaxation and stress relief,” More than twice as many frequent vapers (45%) agreed that it is OK to vape for stress relief compared to non-vapers (20%). Similar patterns exist for survey respondents with any past 30-day use of e-cigarettes.

    “I used nicotine as a stress reliever because I lost sight of working out and my health. Think long term, think about your body and your mind.” – MAYA, 18-24 Quitting smoking has powerful benefits for mental health. According to a 2014 review of 26 studies, quitting smoking is linked with lower levels of stress, anxiety, and depression, as well as improved positive mood and quality of life compared with those who continue to smoke.

    seeks equitable access to mental health and substance abuse treatment for more than 10 million children, adults, and families and works to increase health providers’ abilities to diminish tobacco- and cancer-related disparities in individuals with mental health and substance use challenges. offers 24/7 support from trained crisis counselors from a secure online platform. Text “HOME” to 741741 from anywhere in the U.S. to connect with a volunteer crisis counselor connects callers to trained crisis counselors 24/7. They also provide a chat function on their website. Phone: 1-800-273-TALK (8255). offers an online mental health screening. The tests can help determine whether people are experiencing symptoms of a mental health condition.

    Nicotine withdrawal causes stress and anxiety. Breathing exercises can help — breathing is a proven method to reduce anxiety and can help curve cravings. Breathwrk and This is Quitting from truth have partnered to create quitting-specific breathing exercises to help young people cut nicotine cravings and reach their quitting goals.

    No Worries: Designed to be your stress relief breath. Strong Lungs: Designed to strengthen breathing muscles and increase lung capacity. Craving Curber: Designed to shift your state and attention when experiencing unwanted cravings.

    Users can download the Breathwrk app for free and subscribe to the truth routine for regular reminders and new exercises. As part of the partnership, Breathwrk is also proud to offer the truth community and This is Quitting users a free 6-month subscription to its premium product, Breathwrk Pro, where young people can access all available breaths.

    1. For more information, see,
    2. Policy makers and regulators must take steps to reduce the use of e-cigarettes, including removing all flavored tobacco products, restricting nicotine levels, ensuring a thorough and transparent pre-market review process, restricting e-cigarette marketing to adults only, restricting access to adult smokers, prohibiting internet sales of all tobacco products, and setting taxes on e-cigarettes at a level high enough to discourage youth use.

    See “” for more detail about how Truth Initiative advocates to protect young people from nicotine addiction. “Remember that stress can be dealt with in other ways! Try meditating or even writing down what the problem is and then figure out solutions.” – DALTON, 18-24 Around the country, young people are taking action by using self-care as a form of activism and calling upon decision makers to declare vaping nicotine a mental health issue.

    Why is giving up vaping so hard?

    Nicotine Addiction – Nicotine is in most vapes and is very addictive. The more you vape, the more your brain and body get used to having nicotine, and the harder it is to go without it. When you go without vaping, the nicotine level in your bloodstream drops, which may cause unpleasant feelings, physical symptoms, and strong urges to vape.

    Do you continue to vape even though you want to quit or think it’s hurting you in some way? Do you feel anxious or irritable when you want to use your vape but can’t? Do thoughts about vaping interrupt you when you are focused on other activities? Do you still vape after getting in trouble with your parents or school for vaping? Have you ever tried to quit vaping but couldn’t? Do you feel like you have lost control over your vaping?

    Knowing more about nicotine addiction—and recognizing that you may be addicted—will help you understand why your body feels like it does and why it sometimes feels like you can’t go a minute without thinking about vaping. Trying some of the different strategies described below will help you figure out what works best for you to manage these feelings.

    Why should I quit vaping?

    In some states, deaths have occurred. E-cigarette aerosol inhaled deep into your lungs can contain cancer-causing chemicals, heavy metals, and ultrafine particles that can harm not only your lungs but the rest of your body. substances which have their own set of health risks, such as opioids, cocaine, and meth.

    What is extreme withdrawal from vaping?

    Nicotine withdrawal is the physical and psychological symptoms you feel as nicotine leaves your body. Symptoms include the urge for nicotine, irritation, frustration, trouble sleeping and trouble concentrating. Treatment includes nicotine replacement therapy, other medications, non-drug remedies and coping strategies.

    What happens after you stop vaping for 3 days?

    What happens during nicotine detox? – After just 72 hours, nicotine is completely out of your system. During that time, you may experience headaches, chills and feel irritable as a result of nicotine withdrawal. Nicotine is shown to decrease blood flow around the heart, and some physicians believe vapes can have similar effects.

    How long does it take for nicotine withdrawal from vaping?

    Over time, the body and brain can become dependent on nicotine and crave it once you stop. Nicotine withdrawal is uncomfortable, but it’s not deadly. Withdrawal symptoms usually peak within 3 days of quitting. They can start to improve after 1 week.