How To Make Candles? - CLT Livre

How To Make Candles?

How To Make Candles

What wax is best for candles?

Paraffin Wax – Paraffin wax—a very inexpensive wax—is most widely used across candle brands, says Fitchl, because it can hold a high amount of fragrance and color. It also comes in various melt points, making it suitable for making many different types of candles, from containers to pillars.

Is candle making easy?

The Spruce / Caylin Harris While candles add warmth and light to every space, making your home feel cozier, they don’t last forever and can be a little pricey. It’s easy to learn how to make candles ; they contain three main components: wax, a wick, and a container.

There are many different types of candles, and you control what goes into them. So if you’re sensitive to fragrance, leave it out. Use soy wax if you’re concerned about keeping the air in your home as clean as possible. Before you start, read through the full instructions for making homemade candles. When you’re ready to begin, prep the area where you’ll make your candle.

Cover the surface with newspaper or a brown paper bag. After making your first candle, you can get more adventurous and try making different types of candles; be sure to choose the appropriate wax and wick for a more advanced project. Want a more personal touch? You can customize your candle even further by selecting a fragrance or essential oil to scent your candle—the variations of candles you can make are limited only by your imagination and your willingness to experiment.

What to avoid in candles?

Spotting a non-toxic candle is harder than you might think. Many candles may contain ingredients you haven’t heard of, like hexane, toluene, or 2-tert-Butylcyclohexyl acetate. Not only are these ingredients hard to pronounce, but they are also harmful.

What is safe to put in homemade candles?

Wickless Candles – One of the best ways to get the botanical candle aesthetic is to make wickless candles. A wickless candle is very much like a regular candle, except that it is melted using a warming plate or heat lamp instead of a wick. You can make wickless candles in glass containers or metal tins.

Wickless candles can be any size, but you will probably find that smaller containers give you the best results. Because wickless candles are melted with indirect heat rather than an open flame, you can use essentially any ingredients you want. Botanicals, gemstones, glitter, mica, and other ingredients are all fine to use.

Note : There are tons of different types of wickless candles, with wax melts, squeezable wax, and scoopable wax also falling into this category.

What is candle wax made of?

Wax – The hydrocarbon C 31 H 64 is a typical component of paraffin wax, from which most modern candles are produced. Unlit twisted beeswax candles For most of recorded history candles were made from tallow (rendered from beef or mutton-fat) or beeswax, From the mid-1800s, they were also made from spermaceti, a waxy substance derived from the Sperm whale, which in turn spurred demand for the substance.

  • Candles were also made from stearin (initially manufactured from animal fats but now produced almost exclusively from palm waxes).
  • Today, most candles are made from paraffin wax, a byproduct of petroleum refining.
  • Candles can also be made from microcrystalline wax, beeswax (a byproduct of honey collection ), gel (a mixture of polymer and mineral oil ), or some plant waxes (generally palm, carnauba, bayberry, or soybean wax ).

The size of the flame and corresponding rate of burning is controlled largely by the candle wick, The kind of wax also affects the burn rate, with beeswax and coconut wax burning longer than paraffin or soy wax. Production methods utilize extrusion moulding,

What is the formula for candle making?

The store will not work correctly in the case when cookies are disabled. I’ve never made candles before. Is it difficult? How do I get started? The easiest way to get started making your own candles is to purchase one of our candle making kits, We have four different kits to choose from.

Each comes with detailed step-by-step instructions, as well as ALL of the supplies you will need. If you still have questions, feel free to call or email. We are more than happy to answer the questions you might have. Shop Candle Kits How can I figure out how much wax and fragrance I will need to make my candles? Per pound of wax, you will get about 20 ounces of volume.

To find how much wax you will need, multiply the number of candles you are making by the amount of wax it will hold, and then divide that by 20. For example, if you want to make 30 – 8 ounce candles the math would be as follows: 30 (containers) x 8 (oz per container) = 240 total ounces / 20 = 12 lbs wax needed.

To calculate the amount of fragrance, the math would be as follows (assumes a fragrance load of 11%): 12 (lbs of wax) x 11% (or 0.11) = 1.32 lbs of fragrance You can also convert the total fragrance needed to ounces by multiplying by 16: 12 (lbs of wax) x 16 (oz per lb) = 192 oz x 11% (or 0.11) = 21.12 oz of fragrance Shop Candle Kits How do I determine the burn time of my finished candle? You will have to do a burn test on your candle if you want an accurate burn time.

To do this, you simply burn the candle and keep track of the time that it takes to burn completely. The time that it burns will depend on the wax, wick, fragrance, dye, and the amount of time it is burned in one sitting. The burn time will be longer if you light it and let the melt pool reach the sides of the jar; then extinguish it, let it re-harden and trim the wick before lighting it again.

If the candle is left to burn for an extended period of time before being extinguished, the burn time will be slightly shortened. Shop Candle Kits What can I do to prevent my candles from fading if I have them outside? Fading can happen when candles are exposed to UV rays or fluorescent lighting. Adding UV stabilizer while you are making candles will help greatly reduce fading.

Shop Candle Kits Why do I need to test burn my candles? Test burning your candles before you start selling them will ensure they are burning to your satisfaction. This gives you the opportunity to find problems before they are distributed. You may find in test burning a candle that the wick may not be burning to the edge, or that the wick you chose is too large for the container you are using.

It is better for you to discover a problem than have your customers inform you of one. What will my final cost be in my finished candles? The final cost in a candle will depend on the type candle you are making and all the individual materials that were used. It is not necessary to include the cost of pouring pots, wick bars, molds, or any items that are reusable since they are not replaced each time you make them.

Any container or jar you use should be included in your cost. Shipping charges should also be factored in to your final cost. How do I know how much to charge for my candles? Once you have determined the final cost in your candle, a common practice is to double your cost for wholesale or triple your cost for retail.

  • It is helpful to visit places in your area that may have a comparable item to see what the pricing might be and make sure you are not over or under pricing your candles.
  • If you do not have a storefront, you may be able to charge a little less than the stores do since you don’t have that overhead.
  • I hear a lot of talk about phthalates and phthalate-free fragrance oils.

What does this mean? In the last few years the use of phthalates in fragrance oils and cosmetics has gained a lot of attention. There are some phthalates that are considered harmful and others that are not. For example, nobody would consider all berries or mushrooms unsafe, though specific types have a known toxicity at certain levels.

Phthalates” is a broad term that refers to a wide variety of compounds of differing chemical structure. Safety concerns have been raised about Dibutyl Phthalate (DBP) and Diethyl Hexyl Phthalate (DEHP). We can assure you none of our fragrance oils contain these phthalates. The fragrance oils we carry that are not considered phthalate-free contain Diethyl phthalate (DEP).

DEP as used in fragrances is safe for human health and the environment. The position on DEP from the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) is to make clear that consumers can use fragranced products containing DEP with confidence. In fact, the safety profile for DEP based on “Human Health Criteria” shows DEP to be safer for use on humans than any natural essential oil.

Is candle making profitable?

2. Do candles make a lot of money? – Yes, they do! If you know what you’re doing, selling candles can be a lucrative business, Some candlemakers are able to make a living solely from the sale of their candles, so it’s not just a hobby that can bring in extra cash.

How many candles can I make with 1kg of wax?

How many candles will 1kg of wax make? Orders are dispatched working days Monday – Friday. Dispatch time up to 48 hours from ordering. Free Shipping when you spend £60 on Fragrance Oils (UK mainland only) It is commonly asked, ‘how many candles will 1 kg of wax make?’, the answer to this varies depending on the size of your candle containers. The first thing to remember is that 1kg is the equivalent of 1000g of wax. When using 20cl, 1kg of wax will make a total of 6 candles.

  • Around 166.66g of will be used per candle.
  • It is important to remember to leave a centimeter gap between the wax and the rim of the container.1kg of wax will make a total of 4 candles when using 30cl candle glasses,
  • Therefore, you will be using around 250g of wax per candle.
  • Make sure to pour in the wax leaving a centimeter at the top between the wax and the rim.

If you don’t know the size of your container, there is still a way you can work out how much wax to use. Simply fill up your container with water and pour the water into a measuring jug. Write down the ml amount of the water. Now multiply the figure by 0.9.

Is soy wax candle safe?

Soy vs Paraffin vs Beeswax – The best candles to look out for are made using 100% GMO free (genetically modified organisms) soy wax. Soy wax burns clean and you won’t be filling your home, or your lungs, with potentially deadly smoke, dangerous pollutants or staining your walls and ceilings with black soot.

Is beeswax better than soy wax?

Soy Wax vs Beeswax When deciding which candle wax to buy for a container candle, one of the questions I often get asked is “Should i use Soy Wax or Beeswax”. Well you’re at the right place for the 411 on how to choose between the two. Let me start by saying that at Selfmade Candle we use Soy Wax.

Soy candles are vegan, long burning and all natural whereas beeswax candles are made by bees, smells sweeter and has a higher burning temperature. They both produce natural candles. Which you decide on can depend on cost, burn temperature, vegan friendly and eco friendly properties. I’ve found on average that Soy Wax is cheaper than Beeswax.

I wish beeswax’ inflated price was due to the manufacturing companies paying the bees a fair living wage. Alas, that’s not the case. The additional costs can be attributed to the feed for the bees. For every 1 pound of beeswax produced, bees need to have eaten 6-8 pounds of honey,

That is one expensive meal. Beeswax has a higher burn temperature than soy. What does this mean? If you’re out selling candles at a fair and have your candle lit to demonstrate, your beeswax candle will last longer than your soy wax candle. If it’s an extremely sunny day and hot out, beeswax is also more likely to stay lit with a higher temperature.

This ones pretty clear. Soy wax is a vegetable based wax made from soybeans. The beans are harvested, cleaned and rolled into flakes. Once that’s done, soybean oil is extracted and hydrogenated making the vegan friendly soy wax that we know and love. However, beeswax does what it says on the tin.

A product produced by bees. If you’re a vegan, soy is a clear prevailer for you. At Selfmade Candle this was the key reason why we picked soy. If you’re brand is vegan friendly, soy wax, coconut wax or rapeseed wax are your best choices. Soy wax is eco friendly due to the reduced amounts of soot it produces in the environment.

This means that not only will the rooms in your home have less soot damaged walls, but also that the environment will be a lot cleaner too (than let’s say, a paraffin candle). Worth noting that beeswax is just as eco-friendly. Like soy, It’s biodegradable, non-carcinogenic and non-hazardous.

If you’re looking for a wax for unscented candles, beeswax in it’s natural form will smell slightly sweeter than soy. If you like sugar hunny, beeswax is the one for you. Ok, so this one if purely down to the individual. Soy wax produces a creamy milk like colour when poured. Expect your soy candle to be soy milk colour as opposed to almond.

Whereas, Beeswax can be white-brown in colour. I’m a fan of soy for the flexibility of colour it brings. What starts as a creamy milk can be quite easily turned into anything else with a colour dye. Not that we use colour dyes in any Selfmade Candle products, but it’s nice to know the option exists.

  • When producing a scented candle you want optimum scent throw.
  • Both in terms of Cold Throw (how strong the scent is pre-burn) and Hot Throw (how strong the scent is during the burn).
  • Whilst burning paraffin candles has been said to provide great scent throw, Soy is a great natural alternative.
  • It mixes well with fragrance and essential oils and has both a great cold and hot throw.
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Beeswax can also be mixed well with fragrance or essential oil. However, from our community experience, we’ve found anecdotally that soy performs better than beeswax in this respect. There you have it, when comparing wax, soy wax is arguably better than beeswax due to cost, aesthetics, oil retention, vegan friendly and eco friendly properties.

What wax to avoid in candles?

Are some waxes better than others? – While concerns about candle burning are overblown, it’s true that some candles are better than others. Wax type and quality can change the amount and kind of emissions the candle generates. While there’s no definitive science proving it does any harm, Dr.

Farooq suggests avoiding paraffin wax. Paraffin is made from petroleum, and seems to generate greater emissions than other waxes. And candles made from paraffin tend to be cheaper. “In some cases,” she explains, “these cheaper products have more formaldehyde-generating materials and a lower melting point.

It’s been suggested — but not proven — that cheaper candles are more dangerous because they have more volatile organic carbons in them.” If listed, check the paraffin content of the candle you’re considering buying. Whenever you can, opt for beeswax, soy or other plant-based waxes instead.

Do homemade candles sell well?

Is candle making profitable? – A candle-making business can be highly profitable. It has a low startup cost, doesn’t require much equipment or technical knowledge, and you can make candles at home. Candles are also easy to promote online, lowering your marketing costs and increasing margins.

Is it cheaper to make or buy candles?

7 Reasons to Make Your Own Candles If you love candles, then you know they can be a bit of a splurge. For some high-end brands, a single candle can easily cost as much as $50! But candles don’t have to be expensive if you make them at home there are more benefits to making your candles at home than just being more affordable Here are seven reasons why you should start making your own candles instead of buying them:

  1. It’s a great way to save money.
  2. You can choose your scents.
  3. Customize your colors.
  4. You can pick your containers.
  5. You’re in control of the ingredients.
  6. Candlemaking is therapeutic.
  7. DIY candles make great gifts!

If you’re at the crossroads of whether you should invest in another overpriced candle or try making your own, then keep reading. You’ll find seven compelling reasons to take up candlemaking, and two ways to get started today. Let’s get started then, shall we? Although it might seem impossible to do, or you don’t know where to start, But one barrier is that people think candlemaking could be too expensive of a hobby to get into, or that the cost savings of making a candle vs. buying one at a store aren’t all that different. But as you may or may not know, scented candles are big business. That’s a lot of wax! If people are spending that much on candles in a year, surely it’s more cost-effective to do so than to make a candle yourself, right? It’s significantly less expensive to make scented candles versus buying them in-store.

For example, a 22oz candle from Yankee Candle costs roughly $30; if you spent $30 on supplies for a DIY Yankee Candle, you could make roughly 77oz of candle, meaning each 22oz candle would cost you $8.57. You can make a candle for just a few dollars too – I used premium ingredients in getting to my $8.57 number, like organic soy wax, hemp wicks, all-natural dyes, etc.

Like anything you buy in the store, you’re paying for a brand, transportation, markups for retailers, etc. Buying ingredients directly and making a candle yourself will always be a fraction of the price. And in the case of candlemaking, that price is less than a third of the store’s MSRP.

  1. It’s more than just selling a ton of candles that got the candle industry to nearly a billion and a half dollars in sales in 2021 though; the prices of candles can get ridiculous too.
  2. For instance, the And there are While those are extreme examples, candles are still expensive across major manufacturers.

Just look at It does last 110 hours, but in my house, that’s going to be less than two weeks of usage. Have a look at our to get a sense of how much you can get from a kit – the price comparison to buying candles is ridiculous. When you make candles, you’re in control of the fragrance. This means that you can make a candle that smells exactly like your favorite flower, fruit, or even dessert. You can also mix and match scents to create a unique fragrance that is all your own.

If you’ve ever bought a scented candle only to be disappointed by the scent, then you know how frustrating it can be. But when you make your own candles, you can be sure that the scent is exactly what you want it to be. When you’re buying candles, you’re limited to the scents that the company offers. And while some companies do have a wide selection of scents, others are much more limited.

How To Make Soy Candles DIY Candle Making Tutorial

This can be especially true for seasonal scents; if you want a pumpkin spice candle in July, good luck! Plus, if you purchase in a physical store, then you’re further limited by what candle inventory they have on the shelf. But when you make your own candles, the sky’s the limit.

You can make a pumpkin spice candle in July, or any other scent you want, whenever you want it. That’s not a riddle – have you ever tried to order a candle online? It’s nearly impossible to tell what a scent is going to be like based on a name and description. Even if the company has a sample of the fragrance oil for you to smell, it’s still not going to be the same as smelling the actual candle.

When you make your candles, you can be sure of the scent because you’re the one choosing and adding the fragrance oil. When you make candles, you also have control over the strength of the scent. If you want a candle that has a strong fragrance, you can add more essential oils to the wax.

  1. If you prefer a more subtle scent, you can add less.
  2. This way, you can customize the fragrance to suit your preferences.
  3. When you buy a candle, you’re at the mercy of the manufacturer when it comes to scent strength.
  4. In some cases, this is great – if you love a certain fragrance, you want it to be as strong as possible.

But in other cases, it can be overwhelming. Have you ever been in a store and had to leave because the candles were too strong? Or lighting a candle at home only to have to blow it out because the scent was giving you a headache? If you make candles yourself, you won’t have to worry about that anymore. When you make candles, you can customize the color to match your décor or personal style. Whether you want a bright and bold color or a more subdued and calming hue, it’s easy to achieve with some food coloring and a little bit of trial and error. When you buy candles, you’re stuck with the colors that the company offers.

Just walk down the candle aisle at your local Target or At-Home – all the colors look the same. And while some companies do offer a few different colors, they’re all variations of the same thing. But when you make candles yourself, the world is your oyster! You can choose any color you want, whether it’s bright and bold or subdued and calming.

Plus, you can even mix colors to create a unique shade that’s all your own. This can be especially true for seasonal colors; if you want an orange candle in December, you might have a difficult time finding one, or at least one that isn’t scented for fall.

But when you make your own candles, the sky’s the limit. You can make an orange candle in December, and have it smell like pine needles. With red, blue, and yellow, you can make any color with some elbow grease. But thankfully it’s a lot easier than that. You can find a ton of wax chip kits on Amazon that have tons of color options – for instance, the This stock would last you quite a while.

And you wouldn’t be limited to just using the fully saturated chips – no, you could mix certain flakes and create unique colors altogether. A huge gripe about store-bought candles is that 99% of them come in the same glass jar. How about some variety every once in a while? When you make candles, you can pick any type of container you want.

  • Glass, ceramic, metal – it’s all up to you.
  • You’re also not limited to just jars – there are tons of unique candle containers out there that can add some personality to your space, such as tin cans, coffee mugs, tea cups, bowls, antique vases, etc.
  • Not only can you pick the container, but you can also decorate it however you want.

If you’re using a Mason jar, for instance, you could paint it, wrap it in twine, or even add a label. The possibilities are endless! Throw out the rule book – when you make candles, there are no rules! You can make them in any shape or size you want. If you want a massive candle to last all season, go for it! If you want a tiny candle that will burn for an hour, that’s fine too. You’re also not limited to traditional candle shapes, such as pillars and votives.

  • This is a big deal but often overlooked by the average candle consumer.
  • When you buy a candle from a store, you’re trusting that the company is using quality ingredients – and unfortunately, that’s not always the case.

There have been many reports of candles being made with unhealthy chemicals, such as lead wicks and phthalates. Dyes are often made from synthetic chemicals as well, which can be harmful to your health. Not only are these dangerous for your health, but they can also affect the scent, appearance, and performance of the candle.

But when you make candles at home, you know exactly what’s going into them. You can pick quality ingredients that won’t harm your health, such as beeswax, soy wax, and natural essential oils. This not only gives you peace of mind knowing that your candles are safe, but it also allows you to make a higher quality candle.

And when you use quality ingredients, it shows! Your candles will look and smell better, and they’ll perform better too. Candlemaking is a great way to relax and de-stress. The repetitive motions can be therapeutic, and working with your hands is quite satisfying. Similar to painting, or Not to mention, you can trigger a different body sense with this work – that is, torch the wick and smell your hard work. If you’re looking for a unique and personal gift, look no further than a homemade candle. You can make candles for anyone on your list – friends, family, teachers, neighbors, coworkers – and they’ll appreciate the thoughtfulness that went into making it.

You can even get creative with how you package the candle. For example, you could put it in a mason jar with a bow, or wrap it in burlap and tie it with twine. The possibilities are endless! Not only are DIY candles more personal than store-bought candles, but they’re also usually better quality. As mentioned, when you make your candles, you can control the ingredients and make sure they’re of the highest quality.

So not only will the recipient love the thoughtfulness of the gift, but they’ll also be getting a high-quality candle that they’ll enjoy using. It’s a win-win! If any of the seven reasons to make candles yourself resonated, then you’re probably chomping at the bit to get started.

  • What it comes down to is supplies now, and you have two options.
  • Buy individual ingredients or buy a kit.
  • Here’s the New Hobby Box recommendation for both.
  • You can find some killer kits out there, but also a ton of cheap ones with tons of parts that you won’t need.
  • Because of how the New Hobby Box tutorial is carried out, there’s only one kit that seems to check all the boxes, and that’s the New Hobby Box was built on the premise of sending full kits to people to learn something new; that meant every kit had all the items needed and the customer wouldn’t have to make a run to the store to get any missing pieces.
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For that reason, the SoftOwl Candlemaking Kit is amazing. Instead of listing every item in the kit (you can see all that yourself in our ), you’ll find a few standout features we love, and why they are so great.

  • Premium Soy Wax: This kit uses soy wax, that’s important for your health. Soy wax burns cleanly and is non-toxic, contains no carcinogens, and is better for anyone with allergies. It’s also a flaked wax, which will help it melt way quicker when you’re making your candle in the pot. The kit contains 3 lbs of wax too, which is more than enough as you get started in your candlemaking career. Referencing the 22oz Yankee Candle earlier in this article, the wax in this kit would make 2.5 of the 22oz Yankee Candles, and the whole kit would still be less expensive.
  • Real Tools: Making candles can sometimes be messy, and not in the, but more the “this wax won’t come off of my pots, pans, and utensils.” So instead of having to dedicate a pot, spoon, and anything else in your kitchen to candlemaking, the SoftOwl kit includes a 34oz melting pot for your wax, a thermometer, and a stirring spoon. The pot rocks too, but all are great in the sense that you don’t have to fork over any of your existing kitchenware.
  • Gift Ready: SoftOwl knows that homemade candles make the best gifts – just like the 7th reason in the list above to make your candles instead of buying them. So the SoftOwl kit includes different styles of jars and tins, a couple of tags that you can write a gift note on, and then a nice jar/tin label to add that extra polish to the candle. The New Hobby Box candlemaking kit used to contain similar items, and it’s because there’s an insight and truth around homemade candles, and how they make incredibly memorable gifts.

It wouldn’t be an honest recommendation without pointing out a flaw – one thing that could be improved in the SoftOwl kit is the type of candle wick used. It’s unclear based on the packaging, but it feels and looks like a cotton core wick. There’s nothing inherently wrong with cotton cores – cotton’s a natural fiber after all – and it gets the job done, and burns nicely.

  1. Unless the cotton is organic, it requires pesticides and fertilizer to grow, and not to get too high and mighty on the eco-friendly soapbox, but cotton requires a ton of water to grow.
  2. And in terms of processing, unless it goes through a mechanical process, it most likely requires chemicals to break down so the fibers can be spun into thread – and those chemicals can be toxic, which is the last thing you want to breathe in.
  3. So, we always try to use a more natural and sustainable fiber for everything we do – to candlemaking with hemp wicks.
  4. We recommend purchasing organic hemp candle wicks to use in place of the SoftOwl kit’s wicks. Hemp wicks are incredibly affordable; for instance,

But the real benefit isn’t related to cost, it’s innate to the properties of hemp. The and the processing of the fiber into a thread can be done mechanically, which means no harmful chemicals are needed. It’s not a deal-breaker if you skip the hemp wicks, but for fumes inhaled from a candle, having a wick as pure as possible is never a bad idea.

If you want to go the route of getting individual supplies and tools, then you’ll find the below list below incredibly helpful. – these items are the exact or similar ingredients used in the candlemaking kits that were sold on the New Hobby Box storefront. The list leans toward the most natural ways of making and burning a candle – paying close attention to what you inhale, and also the impact of the materials on the environment.

One of the biggest reasons New Hobby Box was founded, was to discover new things – to find new passions that do more than just distract. Everyone wants to feel fulfilled, have a purpose, and do things that bring joy. Candlemaking does all of those things and more.

It’s a calming activity; it doesn’t require a ton of time or space; the materials aren’t expensive; you can make them as simple or complex as you want; and when you’re done, you have something beautiful and special to show for it. Oh, and it smells great. While this list gave you seven compelling reasons to make candles yourself and pointed you in the right direction to get the supplies needed to start, there are certainly more than seven reasons to love candlemaking.

If you want to give the New Hobby Box candle making or even soap making tutorials a shot, The bottom line is that if you’re looking for a new hobby or even just something to do to relax and unwind, give candle making a try. It just might be the best decision you ever make.

Is a candle business hard?

Accessible to Start – Candle-making is easy to learn thanks to all the great resources on the Internet. Finding and purchasing materials is simple, and you only need a few basic pieces of equipment at the beginning. A low startup cost means your candle business could be profitable within the first few months of candle-making!

Is it cheaper to make your own candles?

7 Reasons to Make Your Own Candles If you love candles, then you know they can be a bit of a splurge. For some high-end brands, a single candle can easily cost as much as $50! But candles don’t have to be expensive if you make them at home there are more benefits to making your candles at home than just being more affordable Here are seven reasons why you should start making your own candles instead of buying them:

  1. It’s a great way to save money.
  2. You can choose your scents.
  3. Customize your colors.
  4. You can pick your containers.
  5. You’re in control of the ingredients.
  6. Candlemaking is therapeutic.
  7. DIY candles make great gifts!

If you’re at the crossroads of whether you should invest in another overpriced candle or try making your own, then keep reading. You’ll find seven compelling reasons to take up candlemaking, and two ways to get started today. Let’s get started then, shall we? Although it might seem impossible to do, or you don’t know where to start, But one barrier is that people think candlemaking could be too expensive of a hobby to get into, or that the cost savings of making a candle vs. buying one at a store aren’t all that different. But as you may or may not know, scented candles are big business. That’s a lot of wax! If people are spending that much on candles in a year, surely it’s more cost-effective to do so than to make a candle yourself, right? It’s significantly less expensive to make scented candles versus buying them in-store.

  • For example, a 22oz candle from Yankee Candle costs roughly $30; if you spent $30 on supplies for a DIY Yankee Candle, you could make roughly 77oz of candle, meaning each 22oz candle would cost you $8.57.
  • You can make a candle for just a few dollars too – I used premium ingredients in getting to my $8.57 number, like organic soy wax, hemp wicks, all-natural dyes, etc.

Like anything you buy in the store, you’re paying for a brand, transportation, markups for retailers, etc. Buying ingredients directly and making a candle yourself will always be a fraction of the price. And in the case of candlemaking, that price is less than a third of the store’s MSRP.

  1. It’s more than just selling a ton of candles that got the candle industry to nearly a billion and a half dollars in sales in 2021 though; the prices of candles can get ridiculous too.
  2. For instance, the And there are While those are extreme examples, candles are still expensive across major manufacturers.

Just look at It does last 110 hours, but in my house, that’s going to be less than two weeks of usage. Have a look at our to get a sense of how much you can get from a kit – the price comparison to buying candles is ridiculous. When you make candles, you’re in control of the fragrance. This means that you can make a candle that smells exactly like your favorite flower, fruit, or even dessert. You can also mix and match scents to create a unique fragrance that is all your own.

  • If you’ve ever bought a scented candle only to be disappointed by the scent, then you know how frustrating it can be.
  • But when you make your own candles, you can be sure that the scent is exactly what you want it to be.
  • When you’re buying candles, you’re limited to the scents that the company offers.
  • And while some companies do have a wide selection of scents, others are much more limited.

This can be especially true for seasonal scents; if you want a pumpkin spice candle in July, good luck! Plus, if you purchase in a physical store, then you’re further limited by what candle inventory they have on the shelf. But when you make your own candles, the sky’s the limit.

  • You can make a pumpkin spice candle in July, or any other scent you want, whenever you want it.
  • That’s not a riddle – have you ever tried to order a candle online? It’s nearly impossible to tell what a scent is going to be like based on a name and description.
  • Even if the company has a sample of the fragrance oil for you to smell, it’s still not going to be the same as smelling the actual candle.

When you make your candles, you can be sure of the scent because you’re the one choosing and adding the fragrance oil. When you make candles, you also have control over the strength of the scent. If you want a candle that has a strong fragrance, you can add more essential oils to the wax.

  1. If you prefer a more subtle scent, you can add less.
  2. This way, you can customize the fragrance to suit your preferences.
  3. When you buy a candle, you’re at the mercy of the manufacturer when it comes to scent strength.
  4. In some cases, this is great – if you love a certain fragrance, you want it to be as strong as possible.
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But in other cases, it can be overwhelming. Have you ever been in a store and had to leave because the candles were too strong? Or lighting a candle at home only to have to blow it out because the scent was giving you a headache? If you make candles yourself, you won’t have to worry about that anymore. When you make candles, you can customize the color to match your décor or personal style. Whether you want a bright and bold color or a more subdued and calming hue, it’s easy to achieve with some food coloring and a little bit of trial and error. When you buy candles, you’re stuck with the colors that the company offers.

  • Just walk down the candle aisle at your local Target or At-Home – all the colors look the same.
  • And while some companies do offer a few different colors, they’re all variations of the same thing.
  • But when you make candles yourself, the world is your oyster! You can choose any color you want, whether it’s bright and bold or subdued and calming.

Plus, you can even mix colors to create a unique shade that’s all your own. This can be especially true for seasonal colors; if you want an orange candle in December, you might have a difficult time finding one, or at least one that isn’t scented for fall.

  • But when you make your own candles, the sky’s the limit.
  • You can make an orange candle in December, and have it smell like pine needles.
  • With red, blue, and yellow, you can make any color with some elbow grease.
  • But thankfully it’s a lot easier than that.
  • You can find a ton of wax chip kits on Amazon that have tons of color options – for instance, the This stock would last you quite a while.

And you wouldn’t be limited to just using the fully saturated chips – no, you could mix certain flakes and create unique colors altogether. A huge gripe about store-bought candles is that 99% of them come in the same glass jar. How about some variety every once in a while? When you make candles, you can pick any type of container you want.

Glass, ceramic, metal – it’s all up to you. You’re also not limited to just jars – there are tons of unique candle containers out there that can add some personality to your space, such as tin cans, coffee mugs, tea cups, bowls, antique vases, etc. Not only can you pick the container, but you can also decorate it however you want.

If you’re using a Mason jar, for instance, you could paint it, wrap it in twine, or even add a label. The possibilities are endless! Throw out the rule book – when you make candles, there are no rules! You can make them in any shape or size you want. If you want a massive candle to last all season, go for it! If you want a tiny candle that will burn for an hour, that’s fine too. You’re also not limited to traditional candle shapes, such as pillars and votives.

  • This is a big deal but often overlooked by the average candle consumer.
  • When you buy a candle from a store, you’re trusting that the company is using quality ingredients – and unfortunately, that’s not always the case.

There have been many reports of candles being made with unhealthy chemicals, such as lead wicks and phthalates. Dyes are often made from synthetic chemicals as well, which can be harmful to your health. Not only are these dangerous for your health, but they can also affect the scent, appearance, and performance of the candle.

  1. But when you make candles at home, you know exactly what’s going into them.
  2. You can pick quality ingredients that won’t harm your health, such as beeswax, soy wax, and natural essential oils.
  3. This not only gives you peace of mind knowing that your candles are safe, but it also allows you to make a higher quality candle.

And when you use quality ingredients, it shows! Your candles will look and smell better, and they’ll perform better too. Candlemaking is a great way to relax and de-stress. The repetitive motions can be therapeutic, and working with your hands is quite satisfying. Similar to painting, or Not to mention, you can trigger a different body sense with this work – that is, torch the wick and smell your hard work. If you’re looking for a unique and personal gift, look no further than a homemade candle. You can make candles for anyone on your list – friends, family, teachers, neighbors, coworkers – and they’ll appreciate the thoughtfulness that went into making it.

  • You can even get creative with how you package the candle.
  • For example, you could put it in a mason jar with a bow, or wrap it in burlap and tie it with twine.
  • The possibilities are endless! Not only are DIY candles more personal than store-bought candles, but they’re also usually better quality.
  • As mentioned, when you make your candles, you can control the ingredients and make sure they’re of the highest quality.

So not only will the recipient love the thoughtfulness of the gift, but they’ll also be getting a high-quality candle that they’ll enjoy using. It’s a win-win! If any of the seven reasons to make candles yourself resonated, then you’re probably chomping at the bit to get started.

  • What it comes down to is supplies now, and you have two options.
  • Buy individual ingredients or buy a kit.
  • Here’s the New Hobby Box recommendation for both.
  • You can find some killer kits out there, but also a ton of cheap ones with tons of parts that you won’t need.
  • Because of how the New Hobby Box tutorial is carried out, there’s only one kit that seems to check all the boxes, and that’s the New Hobby Box was built on the premise of sending full kits to people to learn something new; that meant every kit had all the items needed and the customer wouldn’t have to make a run to the store to get any missing pieces.

For that reason, the SoftOwl Candlemaking Kit is amazing. Instead of listing every item in the kit (you can see all that yourself in our ), you’ll find a few standout features we love, and why they are so great.

  • Premium Soy Wax: This kit uses soy wax, that’s important for your health. Soy wax burns cleanly and is non-toxic, contains no carcinogens, and is better for anyone with allergies. It’s also a flaked wax, which will help it melt way quicker when you’re making your candle in the pot. The kit contains 3 lbs of wax too, which is more than enough as you get started in your candlemaking career. Referencing the 22oz Yankee Candle earlier in this article, the wax in this kit would make 2.5 of the 22oz Yankee Candles, and the whole kit would still be less expensive.
  • Real Tools: Making candles can sometimes be messy, and not in the, but more the “this wax won’t come off of my pots, pans, and utensils.” So instead of having to dedicate a pot, spoon, and anything else in your kitchen to candlemaking, the SoftOwl kit includes a 34oz melting pot for your wax, a thermometer, and a stirring spoon. The pot rocks too, but all are great in the sense that you don’t have to fork over any of your existing kitchenware.
  • Gift Ready: SoftOwl knows that homemade candles make the best gifts – just like the 7th reason in the list above to make your candles instead of buying them. So the SoftOwl kit includes different styles of jars and tins, a couple of tags that you can write a gift note on, and then a nice jar/tin label to add that extra polish to the candle. The New Hobby Box candlemaking kit used to contain similar items, and it’s because there’s an insight and truth around homemade candles, and how they make incredibly memorable gifts.

It wouldn’t be an honest recommendation without pointing out a flaw – one thing that could be improved in the SoftOwl kit is the type of candle wick used. It’s unclear based on the packaging, but it feels and looks like a cotton core wick. There’s nothing inherently wrong with cotton cores – cotton’s a natural fiber after all – and it gets the job done, and burns nicely.

  1. Unless the cotton is organic, it requires pesticides and fertilizer to grow, and not to get too high and mighty on the eco-friendly soapbox, but cotton requires a ton of water to grow.
  2. And in terms of processing, unless it goes through a mechanical process, it most likely requires chemicals to break down so the fibers can be spun into thread – and those chemicals can be toxic, which is the last thing you want to breathe in.
  3. So, we always try to use a more natural and sustainable fiber for everything we do – to candlemaking with hemp wicks.
  4. We recommend purchasing organic hemp candle wicks to use in place of the SoftOwl kit’s wicks. Hemp wicks are incredibly affordable; for instance,

But the real benefit isn’t related to cost, it’s innate to the properties of hemp. The and the processing of the fiber into a thread can be done mechanically, which means no harmful chemicals are needed. It’s not a deal-breaker if you skip the hemp wicks, but for fumes inhaled from a candle, having a wick as pure as possible is never a bad idea.

If you want to go the route of getting individual supplies and tools, then you’ll find the below list below incredibly helpful. – these items are the exact or similar ingredients used in the candlemaking kits that were sold on the New Hobby Box storefront. The list leans toward the most natural ways of making and burning a candle – paying close attention to what you inhale, and also the impact of the materials on the environment.

One of the biggest reasons New Hobby Box was founded, was to discover new things – to find new passions that do more than just distract. Everyone wants to feel fulfilled, have a purpose, and do things that bring joy. Candlemaking does all of those things and more.

  • It’s a calming activity; it doesn’t require a ton of time or space; the materials aren’t expensive; you can make them as simple or complex as you want; and when you’re done, you have something beautiful and special to show for it.
  • Oh, and it smells great.
  • While this list gave you seven compelling reasons to make candles yourself and pointed you in the right direction to get the supplies needed to start, there are certainly more than seven reasons to love candlemaking.

If you want to give the New Hobby Box candle making or even soap making tutorials a shot, The bottom line is that if you’re looking for a new hobby or even just something to do to relax and unwind, give candle making a try. It just might be the best decision you ever make.

What is candle wax made of?

Wax – The hydrocarbon C 31 H 64 is a typical component of paraffin wax, from which most modern candles are produced. Unlit twisted beeswax candles For most of recorded history candles were made from tallow (rendered from beef or mutton-fat) or beeswax, From the mid-1800s, they were also made from spermaceti, a waxy substance derived from the Sperm whale, which in turn spurred demand for the substance.

  • Candles were also made from stearin (initially manufactured from animal fats but now produced almost exclusively from palm waxes).
  • Today, most candles are made from paraffin wax, a byproduct of petroleum refining.
  • Candles can also be made from microcrystalline wax, beeswax (a byproduct of honey collection ), gel (a mixture of polymer and mineral oil ), or some plant waxes (generally palm, carnauba, bayberry, or soybean wax ).

The size of the flame and corresponding rate of burning is controlled largely by the candle wick, The kind of wax also affects the burn rate, with beeswax and coconut wax burning longer than paraffin or soy wax. Production methods utilize extrusion moulding,