How Many Presidents Are There? - CLT Livre

How Many Presidents Are There?

How Many Presidents Are There

How many presidents are from each state?

One: Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and South Carolina. Two: North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Vermont. Four: Massachusetts. Five: New York.

Was Abraham Lincoln the 46th President?

1860 presidential election – The Rail Candidate —Lincoln’s 1860 platform, portrayed as being held up by a slave and his party In 1860, northern and western electoral votes (shown in red) put Lincoln into the White House. On May 9–10, 1860, the Illinois Republican State Convention was held in Decatur. Lincoln’s followers organized a campaign team led by David Davis, Norman Judd, Leonard Swett, and Jesse DuBois, and Lincoln received his first endorsement.

Exploiting his embellished frontier legend (clearing land and splitting fence rails), Lincoln’s supporters adopted the label of “The Rail Candidate”. In 1860, Lincoln described himself: “I am in height, six feet, four inches, nearly; lean in flesh, weighing, on an average, one hundred and eighty pounds; dark complexion, with coarse black hair, and gray eyes.” Michael Martinez wrote about the effective imaging of Lincoln by his campaign.

At times he was presented as the plain-talking “Rail Splitter” and at other times he was “Honest Abe”, unpolished but trustworthy. On May 18, at the Republican National Convention in Chicago, Lincoln won the nomination on the third ballot, beating candidates such as Seward and Chase.

  • A former Democrat, Hannibal Hamlin of Maine, was nominated for vice president to balance the ticket,
  • Lincoln’s success depended on his campaign team, his reputation as a moderate on the slavery issue, and his strong support for internal improvements and the tariff.
  • Pennsylvania put him over the top, led by the state’s iron interests who were reassured by his tariff support.

Lincoln’s managers had focused on this delegation while honoring Lincoln’s dictate to “Make no contracts that will bind me”. As the Slave Power tightened its grip on the national government, most Republicans agreed with Lincoln that the North was the aggrieved party.

Throughout the 1850s, Lincoln had doubted the prospects of civil war, and his supporters rejected claims that his election would incite secession. When Douglas was selected as the candidate of the Northern Democrats, delegates from eleven slave states walked out of the Democratic convention ; they opposed Douglas’s position on popular sovereignty, and selected incumbent Vice President John C.

Breckinridge as their candidate. A group of former Whigs and Know Nothings formed the Constitutional Union Party and nominated John Bell of Tennessee. Lincoln and Douglas competed for votes in the North, while Bell and Breckinridge primarily found support in the South.

Prior to the Republican convention, the Lincoln campaign began cultivating a nationwide youth organization, the Wide Awakes, which it used to generate popular support throughout the country to spearhead voter registration drives, thinking that new voters and young voters tended to embrace new parties.

People of the Northern states knew the Southern states would vote against Lincoln and rallied supporters for Lincoln. As Douglas and the other candidates campaigned, Lincoln gave no speeches, relying on the enthusiasm of the Republican Party. The party did the leg work that produced majorities across the North and produced an abundance of campaign posters, leaflets, and newspaper editorials.

  1. Republican speakers focused first on the party platform, and second on Lincoln’s life story, emphasizing his childhood poverty.
  2. The goal was to demonstrate the power of “free labor”, which allowed a common farm boy to work his way to the top by his own efforts.
  3. The Republican Party’s production of campaign literature dwarfed the combined opposition; a Chicago Tribune writer produced a pamphlet that detailed Lincoln’s life and sold 100,000–200,000 copies.

Though he did not give public appearances, many sought to visit him and write him. In the runup to the election, he took an office in the Illinois state capitol to deal with the influx of attention. He also hired John George Nicolay as his personal secretary, who would remain in that role during the presidency.

On November 6, 1860, Lincoln was elected the 16th president. He was the first Republican president and his victory was entirely due to his support in the North and West. No ballots were cast for him in 10 of the 15 Southern slave states, and he won only two of 996 counties in all the Southern states, an omen of the impending Civil War.

Lincoln received 1,866,452 votes, or 39.8% of the total in a four-way race, carrying the free Northern states, as well as California and Oregon. His victory in the Electoral College was decisive: Lincoln had 180 votes to 123 for his opponents.

Are 46 presidents related to each other?

Ancestral background of presidents of the United States

The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia’s, Please help to demonstrate the notability of the topic by citing that are of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond a mere trivial mention. If notability cannot be shown, the article is likely to be,, or, Find sources: – · · · · ( June 2023 ) ( )

Map showing ancestry The ancestral background of presidents of the United States has been relatively consistent throughout American history. With the exception of and perhaps, every president has ancestors from the, which in turn makes many of them distantly related to one another.

Ennedy was of pure descent, Van Buren was of lineage; and Eisenhower was of and heritage. is the only president to have ancestry from outside ; his paternal family is of the of, He is also believed to be a direct descendant of, a colonial-era slave born in modern-day, Despite speculation, there is no evidence that any of the United States’ presidents have had any ancestry.

The most common ethnic groups in the were those hailing from either or, Those of other backgrounds (such as Irish, Dutch, German, or ) would see attempts to assimilate them into the dominant and predominately, Some political groups within the United States were adamantly opposed to identifying with a foreign nation and would coin those who did as,

Who was oldest President?

Age of presidents – Age of presidents when assuming office The age at inauguration of incoming U.S. presidents is 55 years. The specific years and days median is 55 years and 104.5 days, which falls midway between how old was in 1921 and was in 1963. The youngest person to become U.S.

  • President was, who, at age 42, after the,
  • The youngest at the time of his to the office was, at age 43.
  • The oldest person elected president was, the nation’s current president, at age 77.
  • Biden celebrated a birthday between Election Day and Inauguration Day making him 78 when sworn into office.
  • At age 46, John F.

Kennedy was the youngest president at the end of his tenure, and his lifespan was the shortest of any president. At age 50, Theodore Roosevelt was the youngest person to become a former president. The oldest president at the end of his tenure was at 77; this distinction will eventually fall upon Joe Biden, who is currently 80.

  1. Had the shortest retirement of any president, dying 3 months after leaving office at age 53 (the youngest president to die of natural causes).
  2. ‘s retirement, now 42 years, is the longest in American presidential history.
  3. At age 98, Carter is also the oldest living president and the nation’s longest-lived president.

The youngest living president is, age 62.

Which President did not marry?

James Buchanan The biography for President Buchanan and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. James Buchanan, the 15th President of the United States (1857-1861), served immediately prior to the American Civil War. He remains the only President to be elected from Pennsylvania and to remain a lifelong bachelor.

  • Tall, stately, stiffly formal in the high stock he wore around his jowls, James Buchanan was the only President who never married.
  • Presiding over a rapidly dividing Nation, Buchanan grasped inadequately the political realities of the time.
  • Relying on constitutional doctrines to close the widening rift over slavery, he failed to understand that the North would not accept constitutional arguments which favored the South.

Nor could he realize how sectionalism had realigned political parties: the Democrats split; the Whigs were destroyed, giving rise to the Republicans. Born into a well-to-do Pennsylvania family in 1791, Buchanan, a graduate of Dickinson College, was gifted as a debater and learned in the law.

  1. He was elected five times to the House of Representatives; then, after an interlude as Minister to Russia, served for a decade in the Senate.
  2. He became Polk’s Secretary of State and Pierce’s Minister to Great Britain.
  3. Service abroad helped to bring him the Democratic nomination in 1856 because it had exempted him from involvement in bitter domestic controversies.

As President-elect, Buchanan thought the crisis would disappear if he maintained a sectional balance in his appointments and could persuade the people to accept constitutional law as the Supreme Court interpreted it. The Court was considering the legality of restricting slavery in the territories, and two justices hinted to Buchanan what the decision would be.

  • Thus, in his Inaugural the President referred to the territorial question as “happily, a matter of but little practical importance” since the Supreme Court was about to settle it “speedily and finally.” Two days later Chief Justice Roger B.
  • Taney delivered the Dred Scott decision, asserting that Congress had no constitutional power to deprive persons of their property rights in slaves in the territories.

Southerners were delighted, but the decision created a furor in the North. Buchanan decided to end the troubles in Kansas by urging the admission of the territory as a slave state. Although he directed his Presidential authority to this goal, he further angered the Republicans and alienated members of his own party.

Ansas remained a territory. When Republicans won a plurality in the House in 1858, every significant bill they passed fell before southern votes in the Senate or a Presidential veto. The Federal Government reached a stalemate. Sectional strife rose to such a pitch in 1860 that the Democratic Party split into northern and southern wings, each nominating its own candidate for the Presidency.

Consequently, when the Republicans nominated Abraham Lincoln, it was a foregone conclusion that he would be elected even though his name appeared on no southern ballot. Rather than accept a Republican administration, the southern “fire-eaters” advocated secession.

  1. President Buchanan, dismayed and hesitant, denied the legal right of states to secede but held that the Federal Government legally could not prevent them.
  2. He hoped for compromise, but secessionist leaders did not want compromise.
  3. Then Buchanan took a more militant tack.
  4. As several Cabinet members resigned, he appointed northerners, and sent the Star of the West to carry reinforcements to Fort Sumter.

On January 9, 1861, the vessel was far away. Buchanan reverted to a policy of inactivity that continued until he left office. In March 1861 he retired to his Pennsylvania home Wheatland–where he died seven years later–leaving his successor to resolve the frightful issue facing the Nation.

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Does the President have to be 45?

The President – The President is both the head of state and head of government of the United States of America, and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. Under Article II of the Constitution, the President is responsible for the execution and enforcement of the laws created by Congress.

Fifteen executive departments — each led by an appointed member of the President’s Cabinet — carry out the day-to-day administration of the federal government. They are joined in this by other executive agencies such as the CIA and Environmental Protection Agency, the heads of which are not part of the Cabinet, but who are under the full authority of the President.

The President also appoints the heads of more than 50 independent federal commissions, such as the Federal Reserve Board or the Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as federal judges, ambassadors, and other federal offices. The Executive Office of the President (EOP) consists of the immediate staff to the President, along with entities such as the Office of Management and Budget and the Office of the United States Trade Representative.

The President has the power either to sign legislation into law or to veto bills enacted by Congress, although Congress may override a veto with a two-thirds vote of both houses. The Executive Branch conducts diplomacy with other nations and the President has the power to negotiate and sign treaties, which the Senate ratifies.

The President can issue executive orders, which direct executive officers or clarify and further existing laws. The President also has the power to extend pardons and clemencies for federal crimes. With these powers come several responsibilities, among them a constitutional requirement to “from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.” Although the President may fulfill this requirement in any way he or she chooses, Presidents have traditionally given a State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress each January (except in inaugural years) outlining their agenda for the coming year.

The Constitution lists only three qualifications for the Presidency — the President must be at least 35 years of age, be a natural born citizen, and must have lived in the United States for at least 14 years. And though millions of Americans vote in a presidential election every four years, the President is not, in fact, directly elected by the people.

Instead, on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of every fourth year, the people elect the members of the Electoral College. Apportioned by population to the 50 states — one for each member of their congressional delegation (with the District of Columbia receiving 3 votes) — these Electors then cast the votes for President.

  • There are currently 538 electors in the Electoral College.
  • President Joseph R.
  • Biden is the 46th President of the United States.
  • He is, however, only the 45th person ever to serve as President; President Grover Cleveland served two nonconsecutive terms, and thus is recognized as both the 22nd and the 24th President.

Today, the President is limited to two four-year terms, but until the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1951, a President could serve an unlimited number of terms. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected President four times, serving from 1932 until his death in 1945; he is the only President ever to have served more than two terms.

  • By tradition, the President and the First Family live in the White House in Washington, D.C., also the location of the President’s Oval Office and the offices of his or her senior staff.
  • When the President travels by plane, his or her aircraft is designated Air Force One; the President may also use a Marine Corps helicopter, known as Marine One while the President is on board.

For ground travel, the President uses an armored presidential limousine.

How many presidents of the 70 are there?

The Presidency of the Seventy is a group of seven General Authority Seventies called as presidents by the First Presidency to preside over all members of the Seventy.

Who was President in 1797?

John Adams The biography for President Adams and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. John Adams, a remarkable political philosopher, served as the second President of the United States (1797-1801), after serving as the first Vice President under President George Washington.

  • Learned and thoughtful, John Adams was more remarkable as a political philosopher than as a politician.
  • People and nations are forged in the fires of adversity,” he said, doubtless thinking of his own as well as the American experience.
  • Adams was born in the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1735.
  • A Harvard-educated lawyer, he early became identified with the patriot cause; a delegate to the First and Second Continental Congresses, he led in the movement for independence.

During the Revolutionary War he served in France and Holland in diplomatic roles, and helped negotiate the treaty of peace. From 1785 to 1788 he was minister to the Court of St. James’s, returning to be elected Vice President under George Washington. Adams’ two terms as Vice President were frustrating experiences for a man of his vigor, intellect, and vanity.

He complained to his wife Abigail, “My country has in its wisdom contrived for me the most insignificant office that ever the invention of man contrived or his imagination conceived.” When Adams became President, the war between the French and British was causing great difficulties for the United States on the high seas and intense partisanship among contending factions within the Nation.

His administration focused on France, where the Directory, the ruling group, had refused to receive the American envoy and had suspended commercial relations. Adams sent three commissioners to France, but in the spring of 1798 word arrived that the French Foreign Minister Talleyrand and the Directory had refused to negotiate with them unless they would first pay a substantial bribe.

Adams reported the insult to Congress, and the Senate printed the correspondence, in which the Frenchmen were referred to only as “X, Y, and Z.” The Nation broke out into what Jefferson called “the X.Y.Z. fever,” increased in intensity by Adams’s exhortations. The populace cheered itself hoarse wherever the President appeared.

Never had the Federalists been so popular. Congress appropriated money to complete three new frigates and to build additional ships, and authorized the raising of a provisional army. It also passed the Alien and Sedition Acts, intended to frighten foreign agents out of the country and to stifle the attacks of Republican editors.

  1. President Adams did not call for a declaration of war, but hostilities began at sea.
  2. At first, American shipping was almost defenseless against French privateers, but by 1800 armed merchantmen and U.S.
  3. Warships were clearing the sea-lanes.
  4. Despite several brilliant naval victories, war fever subsided.
  5. Word came to Adams that France also had no stomach for war and would receive an envoy with respect.

Long negotiations ended the quasi war. Sending a peace mission to France brought the full fury of the Hamiltonians against Adams. In the campaign of 1800 the Republicans were united and effective, the Federalists badly divided. Nevertheless, Adams polled only a few less electoral votes than Jefferson, who became President.

On November 1, 1800, just before the election, Adams arrived in the new Capital City to take up his residence in the White House. On his second evening in its damp, unfinished rooms, he wrote his wife, “Before I end my letter, I pray Heaven to bestow the best of Blessings on this House and all that shall hereafter inhabit it.

May none but honest and wise Men ever rule under this roof.” Adams retired to his farm in Quincy. Here he penned his elaborate letters to Thomas Jefferson. Here on July 4, 1826, he whispered his last words: “Thomas Jefferson survives.” But Jefferson had died at Monticello a few hours earlier.

How many first ladies are there?

List of first ladies of the United States First Lady of theUnited States of America Currently in role since January 20, 2021 Madam First LadyInaugural holderWebsite The is the hostess of the, The position is traditionally filled by the wife of the, but, on occasion, the title has been applied to women who were not presidents’ wives, such as when the president was a bachelor or widower, or when the wife of the president was unable to fulfill the duties of the first lady.

  1. The first lady is not an elected position; it carries no official duties and receives no salary.
  2. Nonetheless, she attends many official ceremonies and functions of state either along with or in place of the president.
  3. Traditionally, the first lady does not hold outside employment while occupying the office, although earned money writing and giving lectures, but gave most of it to charity, and has maintained her regular job as an educator during her time in the role.

The first lady has her own staff, including the, the, the, the, and the, The is also in charge of all social and ceremonial events of the White House, and is a branch of the, There have been total of 54 first ladies including 43 official and 11 acting, within 46 first ladyships.

This discrepancy exists because some presidents had multiple first ladies. Following ‘s on January 20, 2021, his wife,, became the 43rd official first lady. There are five living former first ladies:, married to ;, married to ;, married to ;, married to ; and, married to, The first first lady was, married to,

Presidents and had two official first ladies; both remarried during their presidential tenures. The wives of four presidents died before their husbands were sworn into office but are still considered first ladies by the White House and National First Ladies’ Library:, married to ;, married to ;, married to ; and, married to,

One woman who was not married to a president is still considered an official first lady:, niece of bachelor, The other non-spousal relatives who served as White House hostesses are not recognized by the First Ladies’ Library. In 2007, the began releasing a set of half-ounce $10 gold coins under the with engravings of portraits of the first ladies on the,

When a president served without a spouse, a gold coin was issued that bears an obverse image emblematic of as depicted on a circulating coin of that era and a reverse image emblematic of themes of that president’s life. This is true for the coins for Thomas Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and James Buchanan’s first ladies, but not the coin for Chester A.

Who was the president in the 80s?

Ronald Reagan The biography for President Reagan and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. Ronald Reagan, originally an American actor and politician, became the 40th President of the United States serving from 1981 to 1989.

  • His term saw a restoration of prosperity at home, with the goal of achieving “peace through strength” abroad.
  • At the end of his two terms in office, Ronald Reagan viewed with satisfaction the achievements of his innovative program known as the Reagan Revolution, which aimed to reinvigorate the American people and reduce their reliance upon Government.

He felt he had fulfilled his campaign pledge of 1980 to restore “the great, confident roar of American progress and growth and optimism.” On February 6, 1911, Ronald Wilson Reagan was born to Nelle and John Reagan in Tampico, Illinois. He attended high school in nearby Dixon and then worked his way through Eureka College.

  1. There, he studied economics and sociology, played on the football team, and acted in school plays.
  2. Upon graduation, he became a radio sports announcer.
  3. A screen test in 1937 won him a contract in Hollywood.
  4. During the next two decades he appeared in 53 films.
  5. From his first marriage to actress Jane Wyman, he had two children, Maureen and Michael.
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Maureen passed away in 2001. In 1952 he married Nancy Davis, who was also an actress, and they had two children, Patricia Ann and Ronald Prescott. As president of the Screen Actors Guild, Reagan became embroiled in disputes over the issue of Communism in the film industry; his political views shifted from liberal to conservative.

He toured the country as a television host, becoming a spokesman for conservatism. In 1966 he was elected Governor of California by a margin of a million votes; he was re-elected in 1970. Ronald Reagan won the Republican Presidential nomination in 1980 and chose as his running mate former Texas Congressman and United Nations Ambassador George Bush.

Voters troubled by inflation and by the year-long confinement of Americans in Iran swept the Republican ticket into office. Reagan won 489 electoral votes to 49 for President Jimmy Carter. On January 20, 1981, Reagan took office. Only 69 days later he was shot by a would-be assassin, but quickly recovered and returned to duty.

His grace and wit during the dangerous incident caused his popularity to soar. Dealing skillfully with Congress, Reagan obtained legislation to stimulate economic growth, curb inflation, increase employment, and strengthen national defense. He embarked upon a course of cutting taxes and Government expenditures, refusing to deviate from it when the strengthening of defense forces led to a large deficit.

A renewal of national self-confidence by 1984 helped Reagan and Bush win a second term with an unprecedented number of electoral votes. Their victory turned away Democratic challengers Walter F. Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro. In 1986 Reagan obtained an overhaul of the income tax code, which eliminated many deductions and exempted millions of people with low incomes.

  • At the end of his administration, the Nation was enjoying its longest recorded period of peacetime prosperity without recession or depression.
  • In foreign policy, Reagan sought to achieve “peace through strength.” During his two terms he increased defense spending 35 percent, but sought to improve relations with the Soviet Union.

In dramatic meetings with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, he negotiated a treaty that would eliminate intermediate-range nuclear missiles. Reagan declared war against international terrorism, sending American bombers against Libya after evidence came out that Libya was involved in an attack on American soldiers in a West Berlin nightclub.

  • By ordering naval escorts in the Persian Gulf, he maintained the free flow of oil during the Iran-Iraq war.
  • In keeping with the Reagan Doctrine, he gave support to anti-Communist insurgencies in Central America, Asia, and Africa.
  • Overall, the Reagan years saw a restoration of prosperity, and the goal of peace through strength seemed to be within grasp.

Learn more about Ronald Reagan’s spouse,, : Ronald Reagan

How many presidents have been assassinated?

Assassination attempts and plots on the president of the United States have been numerous, ranging from the early 19th century to the 2010s. Andrew Jackson was the first president to experience an assassination attempt, on January 30, 1835, when Richard Lawrence twice tried to shoot the seventh president in the East Portico of the Capitol after Jackson left a funeral held in the House of Representatives Chamber.

The attempt failed when both of Lawrence’s pistols allegedly misfired. Four sitting presidents have been killed: Abraham Lincoln ( 1865, by John Wilkes Booth ), James A. Garfield ( 1881, by Charles J. Guiteau ), William McKinley ( 1901, by Leon Czolgosz ), and John F. Kennedy ( 1963, by Lee Harvey Oswald ).

Additionally, two presidents have been injured in attempted assassinations: former president Theodore Roosevelt ( 1912, by John Flammang Schrank ) and Ronald Reagan ( 1981, by John Hinckley Jr.). In all of these cases, the attacker’s weapon was a firearm.

  • This article lists assassination attempts on former presidents and presidents-elect, but not on those who had not yet been elected president.
  • Many assassination attempts, both successful and unsuccessful, were motivated by a desire to change the policy of the American government.
  • Not all such attacks, however, had political reasons.

Many other attackers had questionable mental stability, and a few were judged legally insane, Historian James W. Clarke suggests that most assassination attempters have been sane and politically motivated, whereas the Department of Justice ‘s legal manual claims that a large majority has been insane.

  1. Some assassins, especially mentally ill ones, acted solely on their own, whereas those pursuing political agendas have more often found supporting conspirators.
  2. Most assassination plotters were arrested and punished by execution or lengthy detainment in a prison or insane asylum.
  3. Since the vice president, the successor of a removed president, usually shares the president’s political party affiliation, the death of the president is unlikely to result in major policy changes.

Possibly for that reason, political groups typically do not coordinate such attacks, even in times of partisan strife. Threats of violence against the president are often made for rhetorical or humorous effect without serious intent, while threatening the president of the United States has been a federal felony since 1917.

Who became President at 42?

Theodore Roosevelt
Portrait by the Pach Brothers, c.  1904
26th President of the United States
In office September 14, 1901 – March 4, 1909
Vice President
  • None (1901–1905)
  • Charles W. Fairbanks (1905–1909)
Preceded by William McKinley
Succeeded by William Howard Taft
25th Vice President of the United States
In office March 4, 1901 – September 14, 1901
President William McKinley
Preceded by Garret Hobart
Succeeded by Charles W. Fairbanks
33rd Governor of New York
In office January 1, 1899 – December 31, 1900
Lieutenant Timothy L. Woodruff
Preceded by Frank S. Black
Succeeded by Benjamin Barker Odell Jr.
5th Assistant Secretary of the Navy
In office April 19, 1897 – May 10, 1898
President William McKinley
Preceded by William McAdoo
Succeeded by Charles Herbert Allen
President of the New York City Board of Police Commissioners
In office May 6, 1895 – April 19, 1897
Appointed by William Lafayette Strong
Preceded by James J. Martin
Succeeded by Frank Moss
Commissioner of the United States Civil Service Commission
In office May 7, 1889 – May 6, 1895
Appointed by Benjamin Harrison
Preceded by John H. Oberly
Succeeded by John B. Harlow
Minority Leader of the New York State Assembly
In office January 1, 1883 – December 31, 1883
Preceded by Thomas G. Alvord
Succeeded by Frank Rice
Member of the New York State Assembly from the 21st district
In office January 1, 1882 – December 31, 1884
Preceded by William J. Trimble
Succeeded by Henry A. Barnum
Personal details
Born Theodore Roosevelt Jr. October 27, 1858 New York City, New York, U.S.
Died January 6, 1919 (aged 60) Oyster Bay, New York, U.S.
Resting place Youngs Memorial Cemetery, Oyster Bay
Political party Republican (1880–1912, 1916–1919)
Other political affiliations Progressive “Bull Moose” (1912–1916)
Spouses
  • Alice Lee ​ ​ ( m. ; died ) ​
  • Edith Carow ​ ​ ( m.) ​
Children
  • Alice
  • Theodore III
  • Kermit
  • Ethel
  • Archibald
  • Quentin
Parents
  • Theodore Roosevelt Sr.
  • Martha Bulloch Roosevelt
Relatives Roosevelt family
Alma mater Harvard University ( AB ) Columbia University
Occupation
  • Author
  • conservationist
  • explorer
  • historian
  • naturalist
  • police commissioner
  • politician
  • soldier
  • sportsman
Civilian awards Nobel Peace Prize (1906)
Signature
Military service
Branch/service United States Army
Years of service
  • 1882–1886 ( New York National Guard )
  • 1898
Rank Colonel
Commands 1st U.S. Volunteer Cavalry
Battles/wars
  • Spanish–American War
    • Battle of Las Guasimas
    • Battle of San Juan Hill
Military awards Medal of Honor ( posthumous, 2001)
3:41 Roosevelt giving a speech during his second presidential campaign Recorded 1912

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. ( ROH -zə-velt ; October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919), often referred to as Teddy or by his initials, T.R., was an American politician, statesman, soldier, conservationist, naturalist, historian, and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909.

He previously served as the 25th vice president under President William McKinley from March to September 1901 and as the 33rd governor of New York from 1899 to 1900. Assuming the presidency after McKinley’s assassination, Roosevelt emerged as a leader of the Republican Party and became a driving force for anti-trust and Progressive policies.

A sickly child with debilitating asthma, he overcame his health problems as he grew by embracing a strenuous lifestyle, Roosevelt integrated his exuberant personality and a vast range of interests and achievements into a “cowboy” persona defined by robust masculinity.

He was home-schooled and began a lifelong naturalist avocation before attending Harvard College, His book The Naval War of 1812 (1882) established his reputation as a learned historian and popular writer. Upon entering politics, Roosevelt became the leader of the reform faction of Republicans in New York’s state legislature,

His first wife and mother died on the same night, devastating him psychologically. He recuperated by buying and operating a cattle ranch in the Dakotas. Roosevelt served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President McKinley, and in 1898 helped plan the highly successful naval war against Spain,

  1. He resigned to help form and lead the Rough Riders, a unit that fought the Spanish Army in Cuba to great publicity.
  2. Returning a war hero, Roosevelt was elected governor of New York in 1898.
  3. The New York state party leadership disliked his ambitious agenda and convinced McKinley to choose him as his running mate in the 1900 election,

Roosevelt campaigned vigorously and the McKinley–Roosevelt ticket won a landslide victory based on a platform of victory, peace, and prosperity. Roosevelt assumed the presidency at age 42, and remains the youngest person to become president of the United States,

  • As a leader of the progressive movement he championed his ” Square Deal ” domestic policies.
  • It called for fairness for all citizens, breaking of bad trusts, regulation of railroads, and pure food and drugs.
  • Roosevelt prioritized conservation and established national parks, forests, and monuments to preserve the nation’s natural resources.

In foreign policy, he focused on Central America, where he began construction of the Panama Canal, Roosevelt expanded the Navy and sent the Great White Fleet on a world tour to project American naval power. His successful efforts to broker the end of the Russo-Japanese War won him the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, making him the first American to ever win a Nobel Prize,

Roosevelt was elected to a full term in 1904 and promoted policies more to the left, despite growing opposition from Republican leaders. During his presidency, he groomed his close ally William Howard Taft to succeed him in the 1908 presidential election, Roosevelt grew frustrated with Taft’s conservatism and belatedly tried to win the 1912 Republican nomination for president,

He failed, walked out, and founded the new Progressive Party, He ran in the 1912 presidential election and the split allowed the Democratic nominee Woodrow Wilson to win the election. Following the defeat, Roosevelt led a four-month expedition to the Amazon basin where he nearly died of tropical disease.

Does the President have to be 45?

The President – The President is both the head of state and head of government of the United States of America, and Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces. Under Article II of the Constitution, the President is responsible for the execution and enforcement of the laws created by Congress.

Fifteen executive departments — each led by an appointed member of the President’s Cabinet — carry out the day-to-day administration of the federal government. They are joined in this by other executive agencies such as the CIA and Environmental Protection Agency, the heads of which are not part of the Cabinet, but who are under the full authority of the President.

The President also appoints the heads of more than 50 independent federal commissions, such as the Federal Reserve Board or the Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as federal judges, ambassadors, and other federal offices. The Executive Office of the President (EOP) consists of the immediate staff to the President, along with entities such as the Office of Management and Budget and the Office of the United States Trade Representative.

  1. The President has the power either to sign legislation into law or to veto bills enacted by Congress, although Congress may override a veto with a two-thirds vote of both houses.
  2. The Executive Branch conducts diplomacy with other nations and the President has the power to negotiate and sign treaties, which the Senate ratifies.
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The President can issue executive orders, which direct executive officers or clarify and further existing laws. The President also has the power to extend pardons and clemencies for federal crimes. With these powers come several responsibilities, among them a constitutional requirement to “from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.” Although the President may fulfill this requirement in any way he or she chooses, Presidents have traditionally given a State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress each January (except in inaugural years) outlining their agenda for the coming year.

The Constitution lists only three qualifications for the Presidency — the President must be at least 35 years of age, be a natural born citizen, and must have lived in the United States for at least 14 years. And though millions of Americans vote in a presidential election every four years, the President is not, in fact, directly elected by the people.

Instead, on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of every fourth year, the people elect the members of the Electoral College. Apportioned by population to the 50 states — one for each member of their congressional delegation (with the District of Columbia receiving 3 votes) — these Electors then cast the votes for President.

  • There are currently 538 electors in the Electoral College.
  • President Joseph R.
  • Biden is the 46th President of the United States.
  • He is, however, only the 45th person ever to serve as President; President Grover Cleveland served two nonconsecutive terms, and thus is recognized as both the 22nd and the 24th President.

Today, the President is limited to two four-year terms, but until the 22nd Amendment to the Constitution, ratified in 1951, a President could serve an unlimited number of terms. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected President four times, serving from 1932 until his death in 1945; he is the only President ever to have served more than two terms.

  • By tradition, the President and the First Family live in the White House in Washington, D.C., also the location of the President’s Oval Office and the offices of his or her senior staff.
  • When the President travels by plane, his or her aircraft is designated Air Force One; the President may also use a Marine Corps helicopter, known as Marine One while the President is on board.

For ground travel, the President uses an armored presidential limousine.

Who was President 1933 to 45?

Franklin D. Roosevelt
Official campaign portrait, 1944
32nd President of the United States
In office March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945
Vice President
  • John Nance Garner (1933–1941)
  • Henry A. Wallace (1941–1945)
  • Harry S. Truman (Jan–Apr.1945)
Preceded by Herbert Hoover
Succeeded by Harry S. Truman
44th Governor of New York
In office January 1, 1929 – December 31, 1932
Lieutenant Herbert H. Lehman
Preceded by Al Smith
Succeeded by Herbert H. Lehman
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
In office March 17, 1913 – August 26, 1920
President Woodrow Wilson
Preceded by Beekman Winthrop
Succeeded by Gordon Woodbury
Member of the New York State Senate from the 26th district
In office January 1, 1911 – March 17, 1913
Preceded by John F. Schlosser
Succeeded by James E. Towner
Personal details
Born Franklin Delano Roosevelt January 30, 1882 Hyde Park, New York, U.S.
Died April 12, 1945 (aged 63) Warm Springs, Georgia, U.S.
Resting place Springwood Estate
Political party Democratic
Spouse Eleanor Roosevelt ​ ( m.) ​
Children 6, including Franklin Jr., Anna, Elliott, James II, and John II
Parents
  • James Roosevelt I
  • Sara Delano
Relatives
  • Roosevelt family
  • Delano family
Alma mater
  • Harvard University ( AB )
  • Columbia University
Profession
  • Lawyer
  • politician
Signature
4:19 On the attack on Pearl Harbor and declaring war on Japan Recorded December 8, 1941

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), commonly known by his initials FDR, was an American politician who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945. He directed the federal government during most of the Great Depression, implementing the New Deal in response to the most significant economic crisis in American history.

He also built the New Deal coalition, realigning American politics into the Fifth Party System and defining American liberalism throughout the middle third of the 20th century. He was a member of the Democratic Party and is the only U.S. president to have served more than eight years in office; his third and fourth terms were dominated by World War II,

After attending college, Roosevelt began to practice law in New York City. He was a member of the New York State Senate from 1911 to 1913 and then the assistant secretary of the Navy under president Woodrow Wilson during World War I, Roosevelt was James M.

Cox ‘s running mate on the Democratic Party ‘s ticket in the 1920 U.S. presidential election, but Cox lost to Republican nominee Warren G. Harding, In 1921, Roosevelt contracted a paralytic illness that permanently paralyzed his legs. He returned to public office as governor of New York from 1929 to 1933, during which he promoted programs to combat the Great Depression besetting the U.S.

In the 1932 presidential election, Roosevelt defeated Republican incumbent president Herbert Hoover in a landslide. During his first 100 days as president, Roosevelt spearheaded unprecedented federal legislation and issued a profusion of executive orders that instituted the New Deal.

  • He created numerous programs to provide relief to the unemployed and farmers while seeking economic recovery with the National Recovery Administration and other programs.
  • He also instituted major regulatory reforms related to finance, communications, and labor, and presided over the end of Prohibition,

In 1936, Roosevelt won a landslide reelection with the economy having improved from 1933, but the economy relapsed into a deep recession in 1937 and 1938. He was unable to expand the Supreme Court in 1937, the same year the conservative coalition was formed to block the implementation of further New Deal programs and reforms.

Major surviving programs and legislation implemented under Roosevelt include the Securities and Exchange Commission, the National Labor Relations Act, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and Social Security, In 1940, he ran successfully for reelection, becoming the only American president to serve for more than two terms.

With World War II looming after 1938 in addition to the Japanese invasion of China and the aggression of Nazi Germany, Roosevelt gave strong diplomatic and financial support to China as well as the United Kingdom and the Soviet Union while the U.S. remained officially neutral.

  • Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, he obtained a declaration of war on Japan the next day, and a few days later, on Germany and Italy,
  • He worked closely with other national leaders in leading the Allies against the Axis powers,
  • Roosevelt supervised the mobilization of the American economy to support the war effort and implemented a Europe first strategy.

He also initiated the development of the world’s first atomic bomb and worked with the other Allied leaders to lay the groundwork for the United Nations and other post-war institutions. Roosevelt won reelection in 1944 but died in 1945 after his physical health seriously and steadily declined during the war years.

What President died in 45?

The biography for President Roosevelt and past presidents is courtesy of the White House Historical Association. Assuming the Presidency at the depth of the Great Depression, Franklin D. Roosevelt helped the American people regain faith in themselves. He brought hope as he promised prompt, vigorous action, and asserted in his Inaugural Address, “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” Born in 1882 at Hyde Park, New York–now a national historic site–he attended Harvard University and Columbia Law School.

  1. On St. Patrick’s Day, 1905, he married Eleanor Roosevelt.
  2. Following the example of his fifth cousin, President Theodore Roosevelt, whom he greatly admired, Franklin D.
  3. Roosevelt entered public service through politics, but as a Democrat.
  4. He won election to the New York Senate in 1910.
  5. President Wilson appointed him Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and he was the Democratic nominee for Vice President in 1920.

In the summer of 1921, when he was 39, disaster hit-he was stricken with poliomyelitis. Demonstrating indomitable courage, he fought to regain the use of his legs, particularly through swimming. At the 1924 Democratic Convention he dramatically appeared on crutches to nominate Alfred E.

Smith as “the Happy Warrior.” In 1928 Roosevelt became Governor of New York. He was elected President in November 1932, to the first of four terms. By March there were 13,000,000 unemployed, and almost every bank was closed. In his first “hundred days,” he proposed, and Congress enacted, a sweeping program to bring recovery to business and agriculture, relief to the unemployed and to those in danger of losing farms and homes, and reform, especially through the establishment of the Tennessee Valley Authority.

By 1935 the Nation had achieved some measure of recovery, but businessmen and bankers were turning more and more against Roosevelt’s New Deal program. They feared his experiments, were appalled because he had taken the Nation off the gold standard and allowed deficits in the budget, and disliked the concessions to labor.

  • Roosevelt responded with a new program of reform: Social Security, heavier taxes on the wealthy, new controls over banks and public utilities, and an enormous work relief program for the unemployed.
  • In 1936 he was re-elected by a top-heavy margin.
  • Feeling he was armed with a popular mandate, he sought legislation to enlarge the Supreme Court, which had been invalidating key New Deal measures.

Roosevelt lost the Supreme Court battle, but a revolution in constitutional law took place. Thereafter the Government could legally regulate the economy. Roosevelt had pledged the United States to the “good neighbor” policy, transforming the Monroe Doctrine from a unilateral American manifesto into arrangements for mutual action against aggressors.

  • He also sought through neutrality legislation to keep the United States out of the war in Europe, yet at the same time to strengthen nations threatened or attacked.
  • When France fell and England came under siege in 1940, he began to send Great Britain all possible aid short of actual military involvement.

When the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, Roosevelt directed organization of the Nation’s manpower and resources for global war. Feeling that the future peace of the world would depend upon relations between the United States and Russia, he devoted much thought to the planning of a United Nations, in which, he hoped, international difficulties could be settled.