How Did Steve Irwin Die? - [] CLT Livre

How Did Steve Irwin Die?

Why did the stingray attack Steve Irwin?

Mystery of Steve Irwin’s death tape that caught final words on camera Published: 03:39 BST, 6 September 2022 | Updated: 07:44 BST, 6 September 2022

  • The location of the tape showing the tragic death of Steve Irwin remains a mystery 16 years after a stingray killed the beloved Australian conservationist.
  • Irwin was barbed by a ray on September 4, 2006, at the Batt Reef near Port Douglas while he filmed a new television show.
  • Camera crews worked desperately to try to save the environmental icon before getting him to shore, where paramedics performed CPR – but he died before reaching the hospital.
  • The entire incident was caught on camera for the TV program, Ocean’s Deadliest, with tapes handed over to authorities to help their investigation.
  • The anniversary of Irwin’s death was on Monday, but the footage has still never been made public, largely thanks to the wishes of his close friends and family.

‘When that is finally released, it will never see the light of day. Ever. Ever,’ Irwin’s best mate and director John Stainton told Larry King in 2006. ‘I actually saw it, but I don’t want to see it again.’ The tape showing the tragic death of Steve Irwin remains a mystery 16 years after beloved Australian conservationist was killed by a stingray Irwin became one of the world’s most beloved and recognisable conversationists thanks to his larger than life personality

  1. Irwin was diving for his new show on the day of his death, with crews initially attempting to track a deadly tiger shark off the reef.
  2. After failing to find one, Irwin instead locked in on a large, eight-foot stingray for a separate project they were working on, believed to be his daughter’s Bindi the Jungle Girl show.
  3. Irwin swam above the usually docile and harmless stingray, before it projected one of its barbs into his chest – potentially mistaking him for a shark.
  4. Rays use the barbs, which are three venomous spinal blades in its tail, as a defence mechanism when threatened or stepped on.
  5. The stingray pierced Irwin’s chest as he swam over it and struck his heart, with crews rushing the icon to their boat.
  6. ‘It went through his chest like a hot knife through butter,’ Irwin’s cameraman Justin Lyons said, who filmed the tragic incident.
  7. Irwin told his team the ray ‘punctured me lung’ after being hit, not realising it had instead struck his heart.
  8. ‘It probably thought Steve’s shadow was a tiger shark, who feeds on them pretty regularly, so it started to attack him,’ Lyons said.
  9. ‘As we’re motoring back, I’m screaming at one of the other crew in the boat to put their hand over the wound, and we’re saying to him things like, “Think of your kids, Steve, hang on, hang on, hang on”.

‘He just sort of calmly looked up at me and said, “I’m dying.” And that was the last thing he said.’ Irwin’s best mate and director John Stainton said the footage of his death would ‘never see the light of day’ and admitted he wished he’d never watched it

  • The 44-year-old conservationist had ordered all his teams to film everything that happened regardless of the dire situation, with the horrific footage immediately handed over to authorities who were investigating his death.
  • Biographer Timmy Donovan said Irwin always told people ‘he would be sad if no one got on tape’.
  • Australia mourned the loss of one of its favourite sons with his funeral broadcast internationally from his beloved Australia Zoo in Queensland in the days following.
  • Irwin’s close friend Stainton, who worked alongside the icon with Discovery Communications, said he would ensure the video was never made public in an emotional interview with CNN host Larry King.
  • ‘I would never want that tape shown,’ the director said in the wake of his death.
  • Stainton accompanied Irwin’s body on a seaplane back from Cairns following his death before watching as his wife Terri and children Bindi and Robert arrived to see his casket for the first time.

‘I travelled on the plane with him for six hours, just him and I. For five hours, I couldn’t stop crying. It was devastating,’ he said in 2006. The footage was handed over to authorities who returned it after their investigation was complete. All copies were destroyed except for one which was given to wife Terri (centre) ‘The fact that we finally got him home and the family saw the casket last night, it was like a full stop.

  1. As for the footage, all copies of Irwin’s death were destroyed immediately after the investigation was complete, except for one.
  2. It has been reported Terri was handed the final copy of her husband’s last moments.
  3. Terri told You magazine in 2018: ‘After Steve died, 100 million viewers watched video of his death that was released on YouTube.’

‘That film was a complete fabrication exploiting people’s sadness. I have never watched the real footage. Why would I? I know how my husband died and I was relieved that the children weren’t on the boat as they usually would be; it would have been horrendous if they had witnessed it.’ According to Terri, there is still a copy sitting in a dusty police vault somewhere.

How could Steve Irwin have survived?

US doctor claims that animal lover could have been saved if he hadn’t pulled out Stingray barb from his chest. – Dr Gabe Mirkin, questioned the circumstances around the death of the 44-year-old presenter after viewing the footage of his final moments, Woman’s Day reported. (Photo: AP) Eleven years since the tragic death of Steve Irwin, a US doctor now makes an extraordinary claim that the crocodile hunter ‘didn’t have to die.” Steve Irwin had died after a stingray barb pierced his heart.

Dr Gabe Mirkin, questioned the circumstances around the death of the 44-year-old presenter after viewing the footage of his final moments, Woman’s Day reported. According to the doctor, the animal enthusiast could have been saved if he had not hastily pulled the stingray barb from his chest. Speaking to RadarOnline, he said that the stingray tray effectively acted as a plug and the moment he removed it, he bled to death.

His comments, have allegedly left Steve Irwin’s wife Terri, ‘going through hell’. Steve Irwin died while filming a documentary on the ocean’s deadliest creatures on the Gold Coast in 2006. According to Steve’s cameraman Justin Lyon, who witnessed the wildlife expert being fatally stabbed by a stingray hundreds of times in a few seconds, Irwin’s last words were “I’m dying”.

Could Steve Irwin have survived stingray attack?

Steve Irwin could not have been saved, says witness to stingray attack The only person to witness the moment was pierced in the chest by a stingray barb said the injuries were so severe that the Australian TV naturalist could not possibly have been saved.

  • Justin Lyons, a regular underwater cameraman for Irwin and a close friend, said the jagged barb punctured Irwin’s chest dozens of times, causing a massive injury to his heart.
  • He obviously didn’t know it had punctured his heart but he knew it had punctured his lung,” Lyons,
  • He was having trouble breathing.

Even if we’d been able to get him into an emergency ward at that moment we probably wouldn’t have been able to save him, because the damage to his heart was massive. As we’re motoring back I’m screaming at one of the other crew in the boat to put their hand over the wound and we’re saying to him things like, ‘Think of your kids, Steve, hang on, hang on, hang on.’ He just sort of calmly looked up at me and said, ‘I’m dying.’ And that was the last thing he said.” Irwin and Lyons were just over a week into filming a series called Ocean’s Deadliest on the Great Barrier Reef in September 2006 when they took an inflatable boat a short distance from the main vessel carrying the rest of the crew in the hope of finding a tiger shark, Lyons said.

  1. Instead they came across a 2.4-metre-wide stingray, and entered chest-deep water to film it.
  2. Stingrays are usually calm and will just swim away if frightened, he said.
  3. The final shot was to be of Irwin swimming up to the stingray, with Lyons then filming it swim away.
  4. I had the camera on.
  5. I thought – this is going to be a great shot, fantastic.

All of a sudden it propped on its front and started stabbing wildly with its tail, hundreds of strikes in a few seconds,” said Lyons. He assumes the animal mistook Irwin’s shadow for a tiger shark, its main prey. Lyons said he initially did not realise his friend was hurt: “I panned with the camera as the stingray swam away.

  1. I didn’t even know it had caused any damage.
  2. It wasn’t until I panned the camera back and Steve was standing in a huge pool of blood that I realised something had gone wrong.” While Irwin was in “extraordinary pain” from the venom on the barb, Lyons said, the naturalist believed he had only punctured a lung.

It was only when Lyons helped put Irwin on the inflatable boat he realised the extent of the damage. “It’s a jagged, sharp barb and it went through his chest like a hot knife through butter.” Lyons added: “He had a two-inch wide injury over his heart, with blood and fluid coming out of it.” Irwin was returned to the main boat and Lyons tried to revive him: “We hoped for a miracle.

I did CPR on him for over an hour before the medics came, but pronounced him dead within 10 seconds of looking at him.” Another cameraman filmed attempts to save him, following Irwin’s strict orders that anything that happened to him during filming should be recorded. Lyons said he did not know what had happened to the footage, and did not think it should ever be shown in any form: “Never.

Out of respect for his family, I would say never.” : Steve Irwin could not have been saved, says witness to stingray attack

How many times did the Ray stab Steve Irwin?

Steve Irwin’s Dying Moments Revealed On Camera

  • The cameraman who filmed the death of Steve Irwin has revealed how the Australian “Crocodile Hunter” was stabbed “100 times” by a stingray within seconds.
  • Irwin, famous for his daring stunts with dangerous animals, was filming a documentary on the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland in 2006 when he died.
  • Justin Lyons was shooting the footage with the 44-year-old TV personality and conservationist when the pair came across an 8ft-wide stingray in chest-high waters.

Image: Irwin and his wife Terri with an alligator in 2002

  1. Speaking for the first time about Irwin’s death, Mr Lyons told of how the final shot was to be of the flat marine fish swimming away from Irwin when it all went tragically wrong.
  2. The pair had just left their main boat in an inflatable to find something to film when they spotted the stingray.
  3. “I had the camera on, I thought this is going to be a great shot, and all of sudden it propped on its front and started stabbing wildly, hundreds of strikes in a few seconds,” Mr Lyons told Australia’s Channel Ten.

Image: Irwin made a name for himself with his fearless animal stunts “I panned with the camera as the stingray swam away and I didn’t know it had caused any damage. It was only when I panned the camera back that I saw Steve standing in a huge pool of blood that I realised something had gone wrong.”

  • Stingrays have several sharp and venomous barbs on their tails that they use to defend themselves when they feel threatened.
  • Mr Lyons denied reports that a barb had stuck in Irwin’s chest and he pulled it out.
  • “It’s a jagged barb and it went through his chest like a hot knife through butter,” he said.
  • “He had a two-inch-wide injury over his heart with blood and fluid coming out of it and we had to get him back to the boat as fast as we can.
  • “I was saying to him things like ‘think of your kids Steve, hang on, hang on, hang on’, and he calmly looked up at me and said ‘I’m dying’ and that was the last thing he said.”
  • Footage of the tragic death was later handed to Irwin’s widow Terri and has never been aired.
  • :: Watch Sky News live on television, on Sky channel 501, Virgin Media channel 602, Freeview channel 82 and Freesat channel 202.
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: Steve Irwin’s Dying Moments Revealed On Camera

Did Steve Irwin pull the barb out himself?

‘Crocodile Hunter’ pulled out stingray’s barb in final moments BEERWAH, Australia – Steve Irwin pulled a poisonous stingray barb from his chest in his dying moments, his longtime manager said Tuesday, after watching videotape of the attack that killed the popular “Crocodile Hunter.” Irwin’s body was returned home to Beerwah, a hamlet in southeastern Queensland on the fringe of the Outback where he lived with his wife and two young children.

Irwin turned a modest reptile park opened by his parents into Australia Zoo, a wildlife reserve that has become an international tourist attraction. Hundreds placed bouquets and handwritten notes at an ad hoc shrine to the popular 44-year-old naturalist outside the park, and other tributes flowed in from Canberra to Hollywood.

The dramatic details of Irwin’s death Monday as he was shooting a program on the Great Barrier Reef were disclosed by John Stainton, his manager and close friend. He said he had viewed the videotape showing the TV star pulling the poisonous stingray barb from his chest.

  • “It shows that Steve came over the top of the ray and the tail came up, and spiked him here (in the chest), and he pulled it out, and the next minute he’s gone,” Stainton told reporters in Cairns, the nearest city to tiny Batt Reef off Australia’s far northeast coast where the accident happened.
  • Stainton said the video was “shocking.”
  • “It’s a very hard thing to watch, because you are actually witnessing somebody die, and it’s terrible,” he said.

The tape was not released to the public. Queensland state police took possession of a copy for a coroner’s investigation. Stainton estimated Irwin’s distance from the stingray when the attack happened at about three feet. State police Superintendent Michael Keating said Irwin was “interacting” with the stingray when it flicked its tail and speared his chest with the bone-hard serrated spine it bore the normally placid animal’s main defense mechanism.

  1. Irwin’s boundless energy and daredevil antics around deadly beasts made him a household name as the Discovery Channel’s “The Crocodile Hunter,” with a reported audience of more than 200 million.
  2. Australia’s leaders interrupted Parliament’s normal business to eulogize Irwin.
  3. “He was a genuine, one-off, remarkable Australian individual and I am distressed at his death,” Prime Minister John Howard said.
  4. His opposition counterpart, Kim Beazley, said: “He was not only a great Aussie bloke, he was determined to instill his passion for the environment and its inhabitants in everybody he met.”
  5. Friend and Oscar-winner Russell Crowe said from New York: “He was and remains the ultimate wildlife warrior.”

The U.S. Embassy issued a statement saying Irwin was an unofficial Australian ambassador to the United States. “With his humor and irrepressible sense of adventure, he represented those things our citizens find most appealing about Australia and its wonderful way of life,” it said.

Hundreds of people journeyed Tuesday to Australia Zoo to remember Irwin. Tia Koivisto drove her daughter Ella, 3, for more than an hour from the Queensland capital of Brisbane to lay a floral tribute. “I was quite moved by what happened, I felt I had to come up and pay my respects,” Koivisto said. People thronged around the entrance of the park, near a billboard featuring Irwin holding a crocodile in his arms and his catch phrase, “Crikey!” It reopened the day after Irwin’s death following a staff meeting to discuss its future.

“We’re all devastated,” said Gail Gipp, the park’s hospital wildlife manager. “It is very surreal at the moment. We’re determined to carry on what he would have wanted.” There was no condolence book, but mourners lined up to sign messages onto khaki work shirts another Irwin trademark that were draped outside the gate.

  1. Someone placed flowers in the mouth of a wooden crocodile nearby.
  2. Mate, you made the world a better place,” read one poster left at the gate.
  3. Steve, our hero, our legend, our wildlife warrior,” read another.
  4. I thought you were immortal.
  5. How I wish that was true,” said a third.
  6. Zoo spokesman Peter Lang said Irwin’s wife, Terri, of Eugene, Ore., daughter Bindi, 8, and son Bob, 2, arrived Monday night from the island state of Tasmania, where they had been vacationing when Irwin was killed.

The family hasn’t spoken about Irwin’s death or announced funeral plans, although Queensland Premier Peter Beattie offered a state funeral. “We’ll never replace Steve,” said Michael Hornby, head of the Wildlife Warriors, one of the Irwin family’s conservation charities.

Did Steve Irwin pull the barb?

“I’m dying.” Those were “Crocodile Hunter” Steve Irwin’s final words, according to a cameraman who said he urged the wildlife icon to “think of his kids” and “hang on” after being stabbed by a stingray in a fatal, freak attack. The cameraman, Justin Lyons, is said to be the sole witness to the Sept.4, 2006, attack and captured the incident with his lens.

But he does not believe the footage should ever be shared with the public. Lyons’ recollections were rocketing around the Internet on Monday morning. It underscored our enduring fascination with the Australian conservationist who sported a blond mullet and khakis as he traipsed the world in search of wild and dangerous animals.

Irwin allowed us to channel our inner explorer by following along, and introduced the masses to his oft-used exclamation of astonishment: “Crikey!” PHOTOS: Bindi Irwin: All grown up, and courting controversy In what is being billed as a world exclusive interview, the underwater cameraman told Australia’s Studio 10 that some of the details that were initially made public about Irwin’s death were incorrect.

  • According to Lyons’ account, he and the 44-year-old Irwin were about eight days into filming a series called “Ocean’s Deadliest” when they found themselves in chest-deep water near Queensland, Australia.
  • They came across a “massive” 8-foot-wide stingray.
  • Despite their impressive size, stingrays are normally docile creatures that do not pose a threat.

The cameraman and Irwin shot some footage that they hoped to use for a different project, and were conferring on what they’d gotten so far. The pair decided to go back under water for “one last shot” of Irwin behind the stingray before it swam off into the ocean.

I thought, ‘This is going to be a great shot,'” Lyons recalled. Then suddenly, and without warning, the creature attacked. “It started stabbing wildly with its tail,” Lyons recalled, “hundreds of strikes within a few seconds.” It all happened so quickly that Lyons did not immediately realize something had gone wrong.

“I panned with the camera as the stingray swam away. I didn’t even know it had caused any damage,” he said. “It wasn’t until I panned the camera back. Steve was standing in a huge pool of blood.” This account contradicts earlier claims that Irwin had died after removing the stingray’s barb after it had become lodged in the middle of his chest.

  • That information was incorrect, Lyons said: “It didn’t come out, Steve didn’t pull it out.” Lyons said he did not realize the extent of Irwin’s injuries.
  • His first thought was that the pair needed to get out of the water quickly, lest they start attracting sharks.
  • For his part, Irwin also seemed to think the damage was limited, telling Lyons: “It punctured me lung.” Within 30 seconds, the crew had Irwin on an inflatable boat heading back to the main vessel being used on the shoot.

There, it soon became clear that Irwin was dying. “He was in extraordinary pain. The damage to his heart was massive.” Lyons described the frantic effort to keep Irwin alive. A crew member put pressure on the wound while he tried to calm his friend. “I was saying to him things like, ‘Think of your kids, Steve, hang on, hang on, hang on,'” he said.

  1. He calmly looked up at me and said, ‘I’m dying.’ And that was the last thing he said.
  2. Those were his final words.” The cameraman said he would later perform CPR on Irwin for nearly an hour while the main vessel took them closer to emergency workers.
  3. But it took professionals only seconds to look at Irwin and declare him dead.

Lyons said that within Irwin’s circle, there was a sense that Irwin would meet his end in a “weird” way. But not by a dangerous creature such as a crocodile or shark, because Irwin was so adept at dealing with such wildlife. “It was shocking,” Lyons said of the way Irwin died.

What happened to the stingray that killed Steve?

Conclusion – The enigmatic question of what happened to the stingray that killed Steve still remains. However, what’s evident is the continuing public interest and debate around Steve Irwin’s legacy and the perception of stingrays. Steve’s untimely death continues to have a significant impact, whether it’s stirring controversies or inspiring discussions about wildlife conservation.

FAQs What is the ‘Death Tape’? It is the video capturing Steve Irwin’s final moments, released in 2023. Who is Sophia Begg? She is an Australian influencer who apologized for dressing as the stingray that killed Steve Irwin. How did Steve Irwin die? He was fatally injured by a short-tailed stingray while filming a documentary.

What happened to the stingray that killed Steve Irwin? The fate of the stingray remains unknown, but the topic continues to generate interest and debate. Disclaimer Statement: Guest Author Siddharth Reddy wrote and edited this Article based on their best knowledge and understanding.

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This information is not accountable for losses, injuries, or damages. : What Happened to the Stingray that Killed Steve Irwin? the Mystery and Controversy

Was Steve Irwin mad at the stingray?

I thought stingrays were harmless, so how did one manage to kill the “Crocodile Hunter?” For a man who made his living tangling with some of the most ferocious creatures on Earth, Steve Irwin met his end at the hands of an unlikely suspect. Irwin was filming a documentary off the coast of Queensland, Australia, on September 4th when a short-tail stingray swimming below him suddenly speared him through the chest with its dagger-like tail spine.

The poisonous stinger punctured Irwin’s heart, killing him almost instantly. The short-tail stingray,, is a huge and normally docile fish. The largest of all stingrays, the short-tail can grow up to 14 feet long and tip the scales at more than 750 pounds. Typically regarded as inquisitive but wary fish, all stingrays are armed with at least one serrated venomous spine at the base of their whip-like tails.

Short-tail stingrays possess two tail spines: a slender spike in front of a huge jagged bayonet. The ray that attacked Irwin plunged its rear tail barb, reportedly close to eight inches long, into his chest. Stingrays harbor these weapons for one purpose: protection.

Tail spines are an effective deterrent to predators, like sharks, that commonly target stingrays. Fatal stingray attacks on humans are exceedingly rare. Only two have been reported in Australian waters since 1945. Both victims were stung in the chest, like Irwin. Worldwide, death by stingray is similarly rare, with only one or two fatal attacks reported each year.

But non-fatal stingray attacks occur frequently in shallow waters worldwide. These usually involve unwitting waders who step on rays nestled into the sand, hiding from predators. These types of attacks—some 1,500 per year occur in U.S. waters alone—are rarely ever fatal, though the pain from stingray venom is said to be excruciating.

Little is known about the specific chemical properties of the short-tail stingray’s poison, but in general, stingray venom is a potent cocktail of neurotoxins, enzymes, and the neurotransmitter serotonin, which restricts smooth muscle contraction and slows blood circulation and subsequent dilution of the venom.

In Irwin’s case, the physical damage to his heart likely killed him before the toxin ever had a chance to take effect. Australian police representatives, reviewing footage of Irwin’s final wildlife encounter, have suggested that Irwin was not harassing the stingray that killed him and that the attack was unprovoked.

  1. Like most other stingrays, short-tail stingrays, also called smooth stingrays or bull rays, spend most of their time gliding over the ocean floor in search of the clams, fish, or crustaceans to eat.
  2. The wave-like of their flattened pectoral fins propel them gracefully over the seabed and draw the attention of divers and snorkellers in the waters of the Indian and West Pacific Oceans.

If and when the video footage of Steve Irwin’s death is released to the public (see this week’s Scienceline Poll), the circumstances surrounding the fatal stingray attack can be more fully scrutinized. Until then, the attack is being characterized as a freak accident and a tragic end to the life of a dedicated conservationist.

Can stingrays hurt you?

The Full Story – The stingray has a fierce reputation and is best known for its infamous tail – long, thin, and whip-like with one to three barbed venomous spinal blades. In Greek mythology, Odysseus was killed when his son Telegonus unintentionally stabbed him using a spear tipped with the spine of a stingray.

  • In 2006, television personality and animal activist Steve Irwin, best known as The Crocodile Hunter, died after being pierced in his chest by a stingray.
  • Stingrays pose a threat to fishermen and beachgoers.
  • Every year, about 1,500-2,000 stingray injuries are reported in the US.
  • Contrary to its reputation, the stingray is a shy and even gentle creature that would rather swim away than strike.
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It reserves its stinger for its predators – sharks and other large carnivorous fish. It attacks people only when it feels directly threatened, often when it’s unintentionally stepped on. Stingrays are flat and can vary in size from several inches to 6.5 ft.

  1. In length and weigh up to 800 lbs.
  2. Their wing-like fins create ripples in the water as they swim.
  3. There are 11 species of stingrays found in the coastal waters of the US.
  4. Their flat bodies and gray color allow them to be camouflaged on the sea floor, where they move slowly to forage for their prey (small fish and crustaceans like crabs and sea snails).

Interestingly, a stingray cannot see its prey because its eyes are on the upper side of its body, while its mouth and nostrils are on the underside. The dangerous part of a stingray is its infamous tail. The spinal blade is also known as the stinger or barb.

This stinger is covered with rows of sharp spines made of cartilage and is strong enough to pierce through the skin of an attacker. Not only does the puncture itself cause injury and pain, but the stinger also releases a complex venom, which leads to intense pain at the puncture site. Uncommon effects of the venom include headaches, nausea and vomiting, fainting, low blood pressure, arrhythmias of the heart, and even seizures.

The most common sites of human envenomation are the legs and feet, which makes sense because the most common reason for envenomation is a swimmer unintentionally stepping on a stingray. The envenomation is often limited to severe pain that is relieved when the area is submerged in hot water.

  1. However, complications such as infection, serious bleeding, or physical trauma can occur.
  2. Part of the spine can also remain embedded in the tissue and require medical intervention to remove it.
  3. Death is extremely rare and results not from the venom but from the puncture wound itself if it is in the chest, abdomen, or neck.

Death from serious infections like tetanus has also been reported. Treatment of stingray injuries starts with first aid. Because the puncture is often deep and considered dirty, there is high risk of infection. It’s important to wash and disinfect the area immediately and obtain a tetanus vaccine or booster if needed.

  1. The wound should be inspected for any retained spines.
  2. The standard treatment for the pain is hot water immersion.
  3. Medical evaluation and treatment in a hospital is necessary if there are any retained spines in the wound, if the puncture is deep, or if it involves the chest, abdomen, or neck.
  4. The best way to prevent being stung by a stingray is to avoid stepping on it when in the ocean by shuffling through the sand rather than lifting your feet and walking normally (commonly referred to as the “stingray shuffle”).

This will warn a stingray of your approach, and it will likely swim away. A pole or stick can also be used ahead of your feet. Divers should be cautious and avoid swimming close to the sea floor. It is also important to know where stingrays are and never provoke them.

Do stingrays shoot their barbs?

I recently unveiled a new tier of Patreon rewards: 3D printed shark and ray models! For $17 per month, you will get a monthly 3D printed educational model of different shark or ray parts in the mail, and you’ll be supporting my efforts to provide these models to schools for free. This month’s reward is the barb from a Pacific Cownose Ray, Rhinoptera steindachneri, This particular specimen is a part of the Texas A&M University Biodiversity Research and Teaching Collection, and was scanned as part of the #ScanAllFishes project! I reached out to Heather Prestidge and Kevin Conway, curators of the Texas A&M collection. Photo courtesy Christian Jones, NOAA Here’s a CT scan focusing on the barb, from the Virtual Natural History Museum, Learn more about the Pacific cownose ray and the science behind stingray barbs below!

Rays are cartilaginous fishes just like sharks, skates, and chimaeras. That means that their skeletons are made not out of bone, but out of cartilage (the bendy stuff that’s in our ears and noses). According to the latest guidebook, there are described 633 species of rays, which are in 26 families. Not all rays are stingrays- in fact, this group of fishes also includes manta rays and sawfish! And in case you’ve ever wondered what the difference between a skate and a ray is, here’s a great answer f rom the Florida Museum :

“The major difference between rays and skates is in their reproductive strategies. Rays are live bearing (viviparous) while skates are egg laying (oviparous), releasing their eggs in hard rectangular cases sometimes called “mermaid’s purses”. Also, skates typically have a prominent dorsal fin while the dorsal fin is absent or greatly reduced in rays.Most rays are kite-shaped with whip-like tails possessing one or two stinging spines while skates have fleshier tails and lack spines. Here’s a look at how the different rays are related to one another, from the Chondrichthyan tree of life project SharksRays.org 2. Stingrays can only use their barb defensively, which means there’s really no such thing as a “stingray attack.” According to the American Museum of Natural History, “When triggered by pressure on the back of the stingray, the tail is suddenly and powerfully thrusted upward and forward, into the victim, which makes the stingray dangerous only if stepped on.” Claims that Steve Irwin, perhaps the most famous victim of a stingray’s barb, was “stabbed hundreds of times” are just not biologically possible.3.

I asked Dr. Christine Bedore, an assistant professor of Biology at Georgia Southern University, about ray barbs. Here’s what she had to say: “The barb differs in morphology among species- some species have shorter barbs and some have serrations, similar to a kitchen knife. Although barbs, when present, are always located on the tail, they may be at the base of the tail where it meets the body or they may be halfway down the tail.

Stingers that are in the middle of the tail are easier to get stung by. Barbs typically have venom, in addition to the sharp stinger. The venom on the stinger is produced by a venom gland in the skin of the tail. Some species have fairly weak venom, so most of the pain associated with being stung is from the wound itself.

However, some species have stronger venom, and the pain associated with the venom may be felt throughout the appendage that was stung (e.g., throughout the entire arm or leg). Stingers are shed as they get old and a new one grows in its place. Sometimes when a stingray uses its stinger for defense, the stinger breaks off, but the stingray will grow a new stinger.

Some, like eagle rays, may have 5-6 stingers that are stacked on top of each other. The new one grows underneath the old ones.” – Dr. Christine Bedore Here’s what it looks like when a stingray stings, from this paper, From Hughes et al.2018, showing the path of a stingray barb marked with a * as a simulated foot steps on the back of the ray 4. Stingray stings are very rarely fatal. In fact, there have been fewer than 30 stingray-related fatalities that have ever been recorded! The few fatal stings are generally the result of the barb piercing someone’s heart, as happened with Steve Irwin, or as a result of the puncture wound getting infected.

However, stingrays do cause lots of injuries – hundreds each year in the United States alone! John Smith (of Pocahontas fame) was stung by a stingray, and there’s still a ” Stingray Point, Virginia ” named in honor of this. In Greek mythology, Odysseus was killed by a spear tipped with a stingray barb,

I was stung in the foot by an Atlantic cownose ray (the barb went right through my work boot), and I can confirm that it hurts a great deal! 5. Rays are actually more threatened as a group than sharks are! According to this open-access research paper led by my PostDoc advisor Dr.

  • Nick Dulvy, of the 7 most threatened families of chondrichthyan fishes, 6 are rays and only one is sharks! The Pacific Cownose Ray’s Atlantic ocean cousin is a focus of some interesting ongoing conservation efforts.
  • After a famous paper claimed that the loss of sharks led to cownose ray population explosions ( incorrectly, as it turns out ), fishermen began targeting cownose rays- and these rays just can’t support a fishery since they only have one pup a year! I asked Sonja Fordham, the President of Shark Advocates International, to describe this conservation issue, and here’s what she said: “Cownose rays are probably among fishermen’s least favorite elasmobranchs.

This schooling species is typically not valuable enough to keep, and a pain to release. Shellfish growers are bothered when rays feed on the spat they’re trying to cultivate; their anecdotes help to fuel misperceptions that they’re also scarfing up all the wild oysters, scallops, and clams.

  • Collective industry distain has led to culls, market development, and recreational killing contests — all despite cownose rays’ exceptional susceptibility to overfishing.
  • Unlike most other fish, however, cownose rays have a wildly different and positive public image, thanks to their starring roles in aquarium touch tanks and their tendency to appear kind of “smiley.” Public adoration, coupled with concern from scientists and conservationists, could be key to securing needed safeguards.

Pleas for protections need to get louder though, as these vulnerable rays continue to be killed, essentially without limit.” – Sonja Fordham Want to get your own model Pacific Cownose Ray barb? Support me on Patreon ! This reward is only available to US residents, but other rewards, including exclusive access to my shark science and conservation newsletter, are available to all.

What’s the difference between a stingray and a manta ray?

Manta ray versus Stingray – Manta rays are related to stingrays. Both have flattened body shapes and wide pectoral fins that are fused to the head. One of the biggest differences between manta rays and stingrays is that manta rays do NOT have a tail “stinger” or barb like stingrays.

Why couldn t Steve Irwin be saved?

A doctor viewing footage of Steve Irwin’s death in 2006 reportedly made the extraordinary claim

Published : 11:19, 11 Sep 2017 Updated : 12:27, 11 Sep 2017

IT’S been 11 years since Steve Irwin tragically died after a stingray barb pierced his heart, but now one US doctor has made an extraordinary claim the crocodile hunter “didn’t have to die”. Dr Gabe Mirkin has questioned the circumstances surrounding the death of the 44-year-old presenter after viewing footage of his final moments, Woman’s Day reported. 5 Crocodile hunter Steve Irwin died after a stingray attack in September 2006 The doctor, who never treated the conservationist, claimed the animal enthusiast could have been saved if he hadn’t hastily pulled the stingray barb from his chest. He reportedly told RadarOnline : “The stingray tail effectively acted as a plug, and the second he removed it he bled to death. 5 Steve feeds crocodile Murray, with a dead chicken while holding his one-month-old baby Bob Credit: Rex Features 5 Cameraman Justin Lyons, pictured, spoke about Steve Irwin’s final moments after the sharp barb went through his chest Credit: Network Ten The pair had finished filming except for a final shot, which was to be the stingray swimming away from dad-of-two Irwin in shallow water in far north Queensland, Australia.

But the 2.4 metre ray suddenly struck out; possibly thinking Irwin’s shadow was a predatory tiger shark. Recalling the tragedy, Lyons said: “I had the camera on. I thought this is going to be a great shot. “All of sudden it propped on its front and started stabbing wildly, hundreds of strikes in a few seconds.

“I panned with the camera as the stingray swam away and I didn’t know it had caused any damage. It was only when I panned the camera back that I saw Steve standing in a huge pool of blood. “The stingray barb didn’t come out. Steve didn’t pull it out. It’s a jagged barb and it went through his chest like hot butter.” The stingray attack and medical treatment were all captured on film, but have never been released. 5 Steve Irwin with his family at Australia Zoo weeks before his tragic death Credit: Getty Images The event at Australia Zoo – which was established in 1970 by Irwin’s parents – raises money for wildlife conservation work. Terri took to Twitter to remember her late husband, who she says “lives on in Robert”, on the momentous day. 5 Robert, pictured with mum Terri and sister Bindi, 18, says the family keep Steve’s memory alive by watching his old TV shows Credit: MEGA Steve’s teen daughter Bindi was filmed wrestling an enormous 15ft crocodile just like her famous father, last year.

Robert, who has also been following in his late father’s footsteps, previously said that the family keep his memory alive by watching home movies and documentaries of him. He was nominated for a kid’s Emmy for his work on TV series Wild But True. We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at [email protected] or call 0207 782 4368,

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Was Steve Irwin in pain?

This was published 16 years ago January 23, 2007 — 8.48pm Steve Irwin secretly lived with chronic pain for the last three years of his life, his father Bob Irwin revealed on a documentary aired in the US last night. The Crocodile Hunter was recuperating from a broken neck while shooting his final documentary, Ocean’s Deadliest,

Years of broken bones from wrestling crocodiles and other creatures had taken its toll on other parts of his body. “Probably very few people knew this, but the last three or four years he was in pain 100 per cent of the time,” Bob Irwin said. “He was an amazing man. “I have never seen anybody be able to do what he did with the amount of pain he was suffering.

“Out of all the things that this accident has brought to me is the fact that Steve is no longer in any pain. “That is something I feel really, really good about.” Bob Irwin was speaking on a 30-minute tribute program called Crikey, What an Adventure!, which followed the 90 minute documentary, Ocean’s Deadliest,

The programs had their world premieres on America’s Discovery and Animal Planet TV channels tonight and will be shown in Australia on January 29 on the Nine Network. American viewers saw footage of Steve Irwin in northern Queensland emotionally addressing his crocodile catching team. The footage was taken four days before his death.

“Sorry for getting all emotional on you, but this has been the best month of my life,” the Crocodile Hunter tells them. “Fair dinkum. I came up here busted up. I came up here with a broken neck.”. you guys made sure I didn’t have to lift anything too heavy and you jumped on the crocs like absolute legends.” Crikey, What an Adventure! also showed light-hearted scenes of Steve Irwin, including quiet moments with his wife Terri, eight-year-old daughter Bindi and three-year-old son, Bob.

“Maybe the next croc you could help with the knots and do some good croc knots with the ropes?” he asks baby Bob on a crocodile hunting expedition. “I can,” Bob happily replies. The Crocodile Hunter’s friend and producer, John Stainton, told viewers the “the future for the Irwin family is bright and promising”.

“They have the strength and courage that comes from Steve’s passion and enthusiasm,” Stainton said. “His goals and dreams will be conquered by their sheer determination. “That is the legacy of being an Irwin.” Steve Irwin died on September 4 last year when a stingray’s barb pierced his heart on the Great Barrier Reef.

  • It occurred while he was scuba diving during a break in filming Ocean’s Deadliest,
  • One of the eeriest scenes in Ocean’s Deadliest occurs early in the documentary when Irwin takes conservationist Philippe Cousteau, who narrates the documentary, aboard Croc One.
  • Croc One is the vessel that days later a dying Irwin was rushed to after the stingray attack.

In the scene, Irwin introduces Cousteau to Dr Jamie Seymour, director of Tropical Australian Stinger Research Unit at Australia’s James Cook University. “Have you got some deadlies for us to play with mate?” Irwin, with a big smile on his face and rubbing his hands excitedly, asks.

How long do stingrays live?

Stingrays live for around 15 to 25 years in the wild. In captivity, this lifespan can drop down to as little as five years in freshwater tanks with proper care.

What was Steve Irwin buried in?

Funeral and memorial services – The Crocoseum at Australia Zoo, where Steve Irwin’s memorial service was held Family and friends of Irwin held a private funeral service in Caloundra on 9 September 2006. Irwin was buried in a private ceremony at Australia Zoo later that same day; the grave site is inaccessible to the zoo’s visitors.

  • Prime Minister Howard and Queensland Premier Beattie had offered to hold a state funeral, but Irwin’s family declined the offer; his father said that he would have preferred to be remembered as an “ordinary bloke “.
  • On 20 September, a public memorial service, introduced by Russell Crowe, was held in Australia Zoo’s 5,500-seat Crocoseum; this service was broadcast live throughout Australia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Asia, and it is estimated to have been seen by over 300 million viewers worldwide.

The memorial included remarks by Prime Minister Howard; Irwin’s father Bob and daughter Bindi; his associates Wes Mannion and John Stainton ; and celebrities from Australia and around the world (including Hugh Jackman, Cameron Diaz, Justin Timberlake, Kevin Costner, Russell Crowe, David Wenham, Kelly Ripa, Larry King and The Wiggles ).

Why couldn t Steve Irwin be saved?

A doctor viewing footage of Steve Irwin’s death in 2006 reportedly made the extraordinary claim

Published : 11:19, 11 Sep 2017 Updated : 12:27, 11 Sep 2017

IT’S been 11 years since Steve Irwin tragically died after a stingray barb pierced his heart, but now one US doctor has made an extraordinary claim the crocodile hunter “didn’t have to die”. Dr Gabe Mirkin has questioned the circumstances surrounding the death of the 44-year-old presenter after viewing footage of his final moments, Woman’s Day reported. 5 Crocodile hunter Steve Irwin died after a stingray attack in September 2006 The doctor, who never treated the conservationist, claimed the animal enthusiast could have been saved if he hadn’t hastily pulled the stingray barb from his chest. He reportedly told RadarOnline : “The stingray tail effectively acted as a plug, and the second he removed it he bled to death. 5 Steve feeds crocodile Murray, with a dead chicken while holding his one-month-old baby Bob Credit: Rex Features 5 Cameraman Justin Lyons, pictured, spoke about Steve Irwin’s final moments after the sharp barb went through his chest Credit: Network Ten The pair had finished filming except for a final shot, which was to be the stingray swimming away from dad-of-two Irwin in shallow water in far north Queensland, Australia.

  1. But the 2.4 metre ray suddenly struck out; possibly thinking Irwin’s shadow was a predatory tiger shark.
  2. Recalling the tragedy, Lyons said: “I had the camera on.
  3. I thought this is going to be a great shot.
  4. All of sudden it propped on its front and started stabbing wildly, hundreds of strikes in a few seconds.

“I panned with the camera as the stingray swam away and I didn’t know it had caused any damage. It was only when I panned the camera back that I saw Steve standing in a huge pool of blood. “The stingray barb didn’t come out. Steve didn’t pull it out. It’s a jagged barb and it went through his chest like hot butter.” The stingray attack and medical treatment were all captured on film, but have never been released. 5 Steve Irwin with his family at Australia Zoo weeks before his tragic death Credit: Getty Images The event at Australia Zoo – which was established in 1970 by Irwin’s parents – raises money for wildlife conservation work. Terri took to Twitter to remember her late husband, who she says “lives on in Robert”, on the momentous day. 5 Robert, pictured with mum Terri and sister Bindi, 18, says the family keep Steve’s memory alive by watching his old TV shows Credit: MEGA Steve’s teen daughter Bindi was filmed wrestling an enormous 15ft crocodile just like her famous father, last year.

  • Robert, who has also been following in his late father’s footsteps, previously said that the family keep his memory alive by watching home movies and documentaries of him.
  • He was nominated for a kid’s Emmy for his work on TV series Wild But True.
  • We pay for your stories! Do you have a story for The Sun Online news team? Email us at [email protected] or call 0207 782 4368,

We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours.’

Is it safe to Swim with stingrays?

It’s one of the most popular excursions for cruise travelers in the Caribbean: swimming with stingrays. The untimely death of Australian naturalist Steve Irwin, who was killed by a stingray barb last week, has many people asking questions, mainly, “Is it safe to go in the water with these ordinarily docile creatures?” Stings happen Over the years, I have taken many stingray tours and all of them have been enjoyable.

  1. While my own experiences have been terrific, I did recently see someone get injured during a stingray tour near Grand Turk (Turks and Caicos).
  2. It happened soon after a young man in our tour group began feeding a group of stingrays.
  3. In the ensuing excitement, the young man lost his balance and fell down.

As he got up, he accidentally stepped on a ray’s tail and a barb entered his foot. To see this strapping young man in excruciating pain was difficult. Our tour was immediately called off, and everyone quickly piled into the tour boat to rush the man back to the ship’s medical center.

  • Fortunately, the young man was OK; unfortunately, he had to get a lot of stitches and spent the rest of his vacation on crutches.
  • Stingrays are ordinarily docile creatures, but they are wild animals nonetheless, and certain precautions must be taken around them.
  • Stingrays 101 According to Alan Henningsen, a noted marine biologist who serves as the fishes research specialist for the National Aquarium in Baltimore, the most common stingray encountered in Caribbean waters is the “Southern Stingray.” These docile creatures can be found in shallow beach waters, on sandy bottoms, over sea grass beds, in lagoons and near reefs, where they feed mainly on crabs, clams, shrimp, marine worms and small fish.

Henningsen says female southern stingrays have a maximum disc width of 6½ feet (which is larger than their male counterparts); the largest recorded weight of this species is 300 pounds. Stingrays have few natural predators other than the occasional large shark and are not targeted by commercial fisheries.

  1. Henningsen says that with proper precautions, everyone can safely appreciate the graceful beauty of stingrays up close.
  2. People just need to remember that stingrays have long, whiplike tails with one or more razor-sharp, serrated barbs, which they use for defense.
  3. Stingrays only flick their barbs upwards in an involuntary reflex action if they feel threatened, as a defensive measure when it is caught, stepped on or otherwise disturbed,” Henningsen says.

The stingrays that most cruise passengers encounter have been artificially concentrated in some areas by resort owners and divers who have established regular feedings that attract them. These local populations are now major tourist attractions in some areas like Grand Cayman.

Henningsen says recent research has shown major differences in behavior between wild stingrays that are fed by humans and wild stingrays that feed on their own. Most notably, the human-fed rays come to behave more like captive rays. Most stingray injuries occur on the legs or feet after unwary people step on or disturb the animals in shallow water.

It is clearly dangerous to swim directly over a stingray (this is how Steve Irwin was fatally injured). In general, if you aren’t on a tour, it is advisable to avoid stingrays, and you should certainly leave them alone while diving or snorkeling. If a person is stung, it’s important to control any bleeding, get hot water on the area (this eases the pain by breaking down the venom protein) and seeking medical attention.

  • Cruise line and tour reaction When I spoke with Carnival Cruise Lines spokesman Vance Gullicksen, he lamented Steve Irwin’s death as a terrible tragedy and added that Carnival has informed guests that stingray injuries are extremely rare.
  • We have had tens of thousands of our guests participate in the stingray shore excursions offered by our tour-operator partners,” Gullicksen said, “and there has never been a fatality or serious injury.” Royal Caribbean International stated it had not changed any stingray excursions that the cruise line offers.

Royal Caribbean representative Lyan Sierra-Caro stated that the cruise line had not seen an increase in questions from passengers, either. “I think everyone understands that this was a rare circumstance,” she said. I also spoke with several Grand Cayman tour companies that operate tours to Stingray City, one of the most popular stingray gathering grounds in the Caribbean; none has experienced cancellations because of Steve Irwin’s death.

The Cayman Islands Tourism Association water sports directors had not heard of cancellations from members, either. According to statistics, there have been only 17 stingray deaths recorded worldwide. While what happened to Steve Irwin is a tragedy, Henningsen notes it’s extremely rare to have a vital organ punctured by a stingray barb.

According to the fishes expert, “You have a better chance of winning the Powerball lottery than dying from a stingray barb.” Have a cruising question or issue for Anita? Feel free to e-mail her. Tripso wants to take you on a cruise for a cause! See how far New Orleans and Cozumel have come since Katrina and Wilma.